Strategy & Policy

 
  •  Unlearning Counterinsurgency

    Unlearning Counterinsurgency

    Unlearning Counterinsurgency Dr Steven Metz Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Once again insurgency and counterinsurgency have become issues of great importance to the U.S. military, particularly the Army. This is not a new phenomenon, but the latest manifestation of an old cycle. Several times in the past the Army has mastered counterinsurgency, only to see attention wane when the strategic significance of insurgency subsided, thus forcing it to re-learn the skill when a new threat emerged. Now we must do this again."
    • Published On: 11/1/2004
  •  Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future

    Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future

    Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future Mr Nathan P Freier Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Next year's Quadrennial Defense Review (or QDR) will be the most important since the end of the Cold War. A frank appraisal of the nation’s strategic future in light of September 11, 2001 (9/11), experience in the war on terrorism, and on-going conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates a need for substantial adjustment to the strategy reflected in QDR ‘01. Such adjustments in defense strategy and policy, however, require that the future trajectory of the nation’s primary challenges be thoroughly reassessed."
    • Published On: 10/1/2004
  •  Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium

    Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium

    Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium Dr Kent H Butts, LTC Curtis W Turner Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Republic of the Philippines (RP) has undertaken a bold initiative to reform its national security architecture in order to more effectively address regional terrorist and other transnational threats. This strategic planning initiative has developed the Emerging Security Environment to 2022 document, a National Military Strategy, a National Internal Security Plan, and a Multi-Year Defense Capability Planning System (MYDCaPS). The initiative has its roots in a two-year long series of trilateral, Republic of the Philippines, Australia and United States (U.S.) Senior Leader Strategic Planning Symposia. The Australian Embassy-Manila hosted the latest event, the Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium, on 13-15 July 2004."
    • Published On: 9/15/2004
  •  A Nation at War in an Era of Strategic Change

    A Nation at War in an Era of Strategic Change

    A Nation at War in an Era of Strategic Change Dr Williamson Murray Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The President, Secretary of Defense, and the Army’s Chief of Staff have all stated that the United States is a “Nation at War.” This fundamental fact is key to what we do at the U.S. Army War College. Because of our continued emphasis on the Global War on Terrorism, we face significant strategic challenges as we continue to transform the force, improve interagency integration into joint operations, and, all the while, engage in active combat operations."
    • Published On: 9/1/2004
  •  Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization

    Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization

    Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization LTC John D Nelson Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Since the end of the first Gulf War in Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm the United States has fought in three decisive operations: Operation Allied Force in Kosovo, Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, and Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq. The principles of Rapid Decisive Operations influenced the pattern and conduct of operations in all three conflicts. The success in the major combat operations of Operation Iraqi Freedom, led Max Boot, to call this a New American Way of War."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism

    Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism

    Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism LTC Michael F Beech Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The defeat of al Qaeda and the global network of Islamic terrorist organizations often appear no more certain today than it did two years ago. Since 9/11 the world has witnessed terrorist attacks against US interests and its allies in seven different countries. Al Qaeda may have lost Afghanistan as a safe haven, but it has gained a new front by conducting operations against US and coalition forces in Iraq. Despite US military successes, al Qaeda retains a demonstrated ability to recruit and conduct operations globally as Osama bin Laden and many of his most experienced inner circle and associates are still at large. Although there has yet to be another devastating attack on the US homeland, it is important to remember that the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon took over three years of planning and preparation. The lack of a subsequent catastrophic attack in the US since 9/11 is not in itself proof of a successful strategy against terrorism. Despite the efforts of two years of military operations against al Qaeda, the CIA pronounced that al Qaeda still represents the single greatest risk to US national security. This paradox calls into question the very frameworks, models and tools that US strategic leaders use to develop counter terrorism policy and strategy."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy, 1st Edition

    U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy, 1st Edition

    U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy, 1st Edition Dr J Boone Bartholomees Jr Book by the US Army War College
    • Published On: 7/1/2004
  •  Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East LTC Raymond A Millen Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "At times, it is difficult to maintain focus on strategic ends while embroiled in a conflict. This is especially true as soldiers and marines battle Iraqi insurgents under close media scrutiny, while pundits question the Iraq war as a means to the Global War on Terror (GWOT) ends. As a topical issue of rectitude, the decision to invade Iraq needs to pass to the historians—continued debate on that issue is a distraction."
    • Published On: 7/1/2004
  •  Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed

    Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed

    Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed Dr Elizabeth Wishnick Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Elizabeth Wishnick builds on the analysis in her important 2002 SSI study, Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia. She contends that by highlighting antiterrorism, the United States addresses a symptom rather than the causes of instability in Central Asia; thus it is contributing to the radicalization of political opposition movements and discrediting both democratization and the U.S. commitment to it. Instead, she argues, the United States should do more to address the underlying human security problems in Central Asia, which increase its vulnerability to terrorist movements."
    • Published On: 5/1/2004
  •  Learning from the Stones: A Go Approach to Mastering China's Strategic Concept, Shi

    Learning from the Stones: A Go Approach to Mastering China's Strategic Concept, Shi

    Learning from the Stones: A Go Approach to Mastering China's Strategic Concept, Shi Dr David Lai Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author introduces a new approach to learning about the different ways of strategic thinking and interaction in Chinese culture. It is through learning the Chinese board game called go. This game is a living reflection of Chinese philosophy, culture, strategic thinking, warfare, military tactics, and diplomatic bargaining. The author also sheds light on the remarkable connection between go and the strategic concepts in Sun Tzu‟s Art of War."
    • Published On: 5/1/2004
  •  Touchstones for the Military Leadership Engaged in Asymmetric Warfare

    Touchstones for the Military Leadership Engaged in Asymmetric Warfare

    Touchstones for the Military Leadership Engaged in Asymmetric Warfare BRIGADIER GENERAL Bikram Singh Peacekeeping Institute Publication by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "While asymmetric warfare has undertaken a new and a broader dimension especially in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of 9/11, in the title of this paper it refers to counterinsurgency warfare, wherein terrorism is employed by the irregular adversary as a means to subvert the rule of law and effect change through violence and fear. This war is being waged in some form or the other in almost 71 countries of the world and the perceivable contours of the futuristic international security landscape portend a threat for its proliferation. Resultantly, the militaries around the world will have to gear up to counter this scourge, which offers different battle space dynamics and challenges for the military leadership. Such warfare underscores the need for different knowledge structures, wherein military’s mass and energy, in concert with other elements of national power, is applied for ‘control’ as against ‘destruction’."
    • Published On: 3/19/2004
  •  Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror

    Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror

    Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror Dr Stephen D Biddle Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The national security debate tends to focus on means. How much money should we spend? Where should we use force? How should our troops be equipped? Ends, however, ought to shape decisions about means. Yet the ends of American national security usually get less attention than the means. As the nation debates national security in this time of war, what critical questions about the ends of American strategy should we be considering?"
    • Published On: 3/1/2004
  •  Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia

    Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia

    Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Uzbekistan has announced that it will offer U.S. forces a base for operations in Afghanistan, and that it does not rule out the possibility of a permanent base if needed. The importance of this cannot be overestimated. Both Russia and China hoped America's incursion into Central Asia was temporary and would end when the terrorism threat abated. Instead, it appears the United States will remain a major player there, not only countering terrorism but also maintaining access to large energy deposits, preserving options for democratizing these states, and establishing a global power projection capability."
    • Published On: 2/1/2004
  •  From "Defending Forward" to a "Global Defense-In-Depth": Globalization and Homeland Security

    From "Defending Forward" to a "Global Defense-In-Depth": Globalization and Homeland Security

    From "Defending Forward" to a "Global Defense-In-Depth": Globalization and Homeland Security Dr Antulio J Echevarria II, Prof Bert B Tussing Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In July of last year, the Bush administration published the National Strategy for Homeland Security (NSHS) which, while commendable in many ways, failed to take into account the effects of globalization in planning for the nation’s security. Safeguarding America’s homeland in an era of globalization requires a more comprehensive approach based on a “global defense-in-depth.” The NSHS amounts to little more than a strategic directive for the newly formed Department of Homeland Security (DHS), rather than a national strategy..."
    • Published On: 10/1/2003
  •  Socio-Economic Roots of Radicalism?: Towards Explaining the Appeal of Islamic Radicals

    Socio-Economic Roots of Radicalism?: Towards Explaining the Appeal of Islamic Radicals

    Socio-Economic Roots of Radicalism?: Towards Explaining the Appeal of Islamic Radicals Prof Alan Richards Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph, by Dr. Alan Richards, addresses the critical questions involved in understanding and coping with the roots of Islamic radicalism. His work closely examines the links between radicalism and a series of crises associated with modernization in the Islamic World. The result is a thoughtful and probing study including policy recommendations for U.S. military and civilian decisionmakers that makes intelligible the complex subject of Islamic radicalism."
    • Published On: 7/1/2003
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