Strategy & Policy

 
  •  Defining and Achieving Decisive Victory

    Defining and Achieving Decisive Victory

    Defining and Achieving Decisive Victory Dr Colin S Gray Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Colin Gray, one of the world’s leading strategic thinkers, explores the concept of victory in the war in terrorism, but he does so by placing it within the larger currents of change that are sweeping the global security environment. He contends that the time-tested idea of decisive victory is still an important one, but must be designed very carefully in this dangerous new world. To do so correctly can provide the foundation for an effective strategy. To fail to do so could be the first step toward strategic defeat."
    • Published On: 4/1/2002
  •  U.S. Military Presence in the Persian Gulf: Challenges and Prospects

    U.S. Military Presence in the Persian Gulf: Challenges and Prospects

    U.S. Military Presence in the Persian Gulf: Challenges and Prospects Dr Sami G Hajjar Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author of this monograph, Dr. Sami Hajjar, considers the critical questions of U.S. military presence in the Gulf, the challenges it faces, and the prospects that lay ahead. He relies, in his presentation and analysis, on a variety of regional sources including newspaper reports and personal interviews conducted in the United States and the Gulf region, as well as on government and academic sources. The result is a comprehensive study, including policy recommendations for U.S. military and civilian decisionmakers, that makes intelligible the complex subject of U.S.-Gulf relations."
    • Published On: 3/1/2002
  •  The Intervention Debate: Towards a Posture of Principled Judgment

    The Intervention Debate: Towards a Posture of Principled Judgment

    The Intervention Debate: Towards a Posture of Principled Judgment Dr John Garofano Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Deciding when and how to use force is one of the central elements of strategy. Throughout American history, debate has raged over whether force is appropriate only in defense of the homeland and vital national interests or whether it should also be used to promote more expansive objectives like regional security and stopping humanitarian disasters in regions with few tangible U.S. interests."
    • Published On: 1/1/2002
  •  Budget Policy and Fiscal Risk: Implications for Defense

    Budget Policy and Fiscal Risk: Implications for Defense

    Budget Policy and Fiscal Risk: Implications for Defense Dr Dennis S Ippolito Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The fate of defense budgets is closely tied to the size, composition, and balance of the federal budget. Over the past decade, efforts to reduce the relative level of federal spending and to eliminate deficits yielded disproportionate cuts in defense. Now that the federal budget is in surplus, and expected to remain so for the next decade, the prospects for more adequate defense funding appear more positive."
    • Published On: 9/1/2001
  •  Toward a Strategy of Positive Ends

    Toward a Strategy of Positive Ends

    Toward a Strategy of Positive Ends Dr Antulio J Echevarria II, BG Huba Wass de Czege Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Defense planners and strategists have recently proposed a variety of alternatives for America’s role in what many see as a dramatically different international situation. Most of those proposals, though, continue with a Cold War paradigm of trying to foresee what the next threat might be and how the United States might best prepare itself to respond to it. Consequently, the possibility of taking advantage of the intrinsic dynamism of the new security environment in order to create conditions that might promote positive ends—long-term peace, stability, and prosperity—has remained largely overlooked."
    • Published On: 9/1/2001
  •  Jihadi Groups, Nuclear Pakistan, and the New Great Game

    Jihadi Groups, Nuclear Pakistan, and the New Great Game

    Jihadi Groups, Nuclear Pakistan, and the New Great Game Dr M Ehsan Ahrari Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Ehsan Ahrari, of the Armed Forces Staff College, assesses Jihadi groups from the framework of a new “Great Game” for influence in Central Asia involving an array of states. He argues that, if this competition leads to increased violence, outside states including the United States could be drawn in. On the other hand, if the region stabilizes, it could provide solid economic and political partners for the United States. A well-designed American strategy, Ahrari contends, might help avoid crises or catastrophe."
    • Published On: 8/1/2001
  •  Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm

    Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm

    Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm Dr Steven Metz Strategic Alternatives Report by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since the early 1990s, U.S. military strategy has called for a force able to fight and win two nearly-simultaneous major theater wars (MTWs). An MTW was something similar to Operation DESERT STORM—a large-scale conventional war in Eurasia against an aggressive regional power involving substantial American forces from all services and, most likely, allies or coalition partners. While policymakers and planners admitted that the outbreak of two nearly simultaneous MTWs was unlikely, they felt that a military able to deal with such a challenge would also be sufficient for other likely missions and tasks."
    • Published On: 4/1/2001
  •  The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective

    The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective

    The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective Dr Antulio J Echevarria II Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The topic of homeland security includes a broad array of missions and mission areas ranging from national missile defense to military assistance to civil authorities. Recently the topic has attracted a great deal of attention due to the public’s heightened awareness of the variety and nature of emerging threats and of the United States’ vulnerabilities to them."
    • Published On: 3/1/2001
  •  Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century

    Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century

    Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century Colonel Peter D. Menk Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Over the past half-century deterrence has been the bedrock of United States defense policy. As we move into the first quarter of the 21st century deterrence will remain fundamental to national security, however, a continually evolving multi-polar world may require different methodologies to achieve deterrence. Therefore a new set of dialogues on the nature of deterrence is required."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy Dr Joseph R Cerami, COL James F Holcomb Jr Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Advice to strategists comes in many forms. Kennedy and Gaddis’s thoughts expressed above are representative of most scholars, statesmen, and generals—strategy is a critical subject for senior leaders. George Marshall expressed concerns, late in his distinguished career, that as a statesman he had to learn a “whole new set of skills.” Theater strategists, like Field Marshall Slim, have written that senior leaders must learn how to “think big.” Important books on the subject stress an in depth knowledge of history, economics, politics, geography, culture, and so on. For a concept that remains hard to define, the study of strategy remains a complex subject of lifelong learning for scholars, statesmen, and soldiers alike."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts Dr Douglas V Johnson II, Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute: "In war, there are always differences between the opponents. At times these are insignificant, passing disparities with no bearing on the outcome. At other times, the differences between opponents are important, placing one in a position of advantage, the other at a disadvantage. This is a very simple observation, but from it flows one of the pressing issues faced by the United States today: strategic asymmetry."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop

    Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop

    Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop COL Peter D Menk Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "This Issue Paper summarizes the factual discussions and issues raised during the Center for Strategic Leadership, United States Army War College and the Foreign Service Institute, Department of State hosted Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop, conducted at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania November 28 to November 30, 2000. Participants included United States Ambassadors and United States military commanders experienced in affected regions, distinguished subject matter experts from the inter-agency arena, NGOs, allied nations, and the United Nations."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review

    American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review

    American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Because of the confluence of the congressionally mandated Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and a presidential election, the years 2000 and 2001 are likely to be important in the evolution of American military strategy. Basic strategic concepts and alternatives will be debated and analyzed. The results will shape U.S. strategy for several decades. This study provides a brief history of the evolution of American military strategy since the end of the Cold War, delineates the key issues which are likely to shape the upcoming QDR process, and assesses a range of strategic alternatives."
    • Published On: 9/1/2000
  •  Armed Conflict in the 21st Century: The Information Revolution and Post-Modern Warfare

    Armed Conflict in the 21st Century: The Information Revolution and Post-Modern Warfare

    Armed Conflict in the 21st Century: The Information Revolution and Post-Modern Warfare Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Steven Metz, who was one of the earliest analysts of the strategic dimension of the revolution in military affairs, suggests that official thinking within the U.S. military may be too narrow. The information revolution, he contends, will have far-reaching strategic effects. The transformation it brings will not only be technological, but political, social, ethical and strategic as well."
    • Published On: 4/1/2000
  •  Prevailing in a Well-Armed World: Devising Competitive Strategies Against Weapons Proliferation

    Prevailing in a Well-Armed World: Devising Competitive Strategies Against Weapons Proliferation

    Prevailing in a Well-Armed World: Devising Competitive Strategies Against Weapons Proliferation Mr Henry D Sokolski Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The United States has a long-standing commitment to efforts to limit, delay, or stop, and even reverse the proliferation of a variety of weapons and weapon systems. The several papers contained in this volume are drawn from a conference that explored the merits of, and various methods of applying, a competitive strategies approach to the pursuit of U.S. goals in nonproliferation. This approach requires thinking through how to improve one’s relative position in any long-term competition."
    • Published On: 3/1/2000
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