Op-Eds

 
  •  Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera?

    Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera?

    Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera? Dr W Andrew Terrill Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the rogues’ gallery of contemporary American politics, one of our chief villains is the Qatari satellite television station, al Jazeera. This station at various times has been charged with being a bin Laden mouthpiece, pro-Saddam Hussein, insensitive to U.S. casualties, and willing to find bad motives in just about everything that the United States does in the region. "
    • Published On: 2/1/2005
  •  It's Asia (Again)

    It's Asia (Again)

    It's Asia (Again) Dr Andrew Scobell Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "One of the persistent claims made as the 20th century came to a close was that Asia and the Pacific were increasingly significant to the United States and the world. Analysts and commentators proclaimed that we were entering a “Pacific Century” and pointed to the rising power of large states such as China and India. Japan has been a major economic power for decades but the growth rates experienced by China and more recently by India, and expanding trade flows suggest the world’s economic center of gravity is indeed shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific."
    • Published On: 1/1/2005
  •  The Paradox of Civil War

    The Paradox of Civil War

    The Paradox of Civil War Dr Stephen D Biddle Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The danger of civil war in Iraq has gotten much recent attention. Civil war would certainly be a disaster. Paradoxically, though, threatening overt civil war may be the only way out of our current predicament."
    • Published On: 12/1/2004
  •  Unlearning Counterinsurgency

    Unlearning Counterinsurgency

    Unlearning Counterinsurgency Dr Steven Metz Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Once again insurgency and counterinsurgency have become issues of great importance to the U.S. military, particularly the Army. This is not a new phenomenon, but the latest manifestation of an old cycle. Several times in the past the Army has mastered counterinsurgency, only to see attention wane when the strategic significance of insurgency subsided, thus forcing it to re-learn the skill when a new threat emerged. Now we must do this again."
    • Published On: 11/1/2004
  •  Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future

    Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future

    Confronting an Irregular and Catastrophic Future Mr Nathan P Freier Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Next year's Quadrennial Defense Review (or QDR) will be the most important since the end of the Cold War. A frank appraisal of the nation’s strategic future in light of September 11, 2001 (9/11), experience in the war on terrorism, and on-going conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates a need for substantial adjustment to the strategy reflected in QDR ‘01. Such adjustments in defense strategy and policy, however, require that the future trajectory of the nation’s primary challenges be thoroughly reassessed."
    • Published On: 10/1/2004
  •  Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba Dr Max G Manwaring Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Four uncomfortable questions arise, even in circumspect circles, regarding the possible succession of power in Cuba. First, assuming the nearly 80-year old Fidel Castro is mortal, 'Who will succeed him when he dies?' Second, 'What role will the Cuban armed forces play in the transition process?' Third, 'What could happen to disrupt that process?' And, finally, 'Will the United States respond to the event in an ad hoc manner, or will a plan be in place to help ensure U.S. interests?' "
    • Published On: 9/1/2004
  •  Is it all about Winning?

    Is it all about Winning?

    Is it all about Winning? Dr Dallas D Owens Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute " Only a few years ago the Army emphasized to itself, the rest of the U.S. defense establishment, and politicians that the Army's primary mission was to fight wars. The 2001 edition of The Army (FM-1) confirmed that, 'the Army's nonnegotiable contract with the American people is to fight and win our Nation's wars.' The Army's core competencies were, except for support to civil authorities, a list of war prevention, preparation, and fighting capabilities."
    • Published On: 8/1/2004
  •  Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East LTC Raymond A Millen Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "At times, it is difficult to maintain focus on strategic ends while embroiled in a conflict. This is especially true as soldiers and marines battle Iraqi insurgents under close media scrutiny, while pundits question the Iraq war as a means to the Global War on Terror (GWOT) ends. As a topical issue of rectitude, the decision to invade Iraq needs to pass to the historians—continued debate on that issue is a distraction."
    • Published On: 7/1/2004
  •  Fighting Insurgents--No Shortcuts to Success

    Fighting Insurgents--No Shortcuts to Success

    Fighting Insurgents--No Shortcuts to Success Dr James S Corum Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For the last 3 decades, the Army, the Defense Department, and the CIA have emphasized the high tech aspects of intelligence, sophisticated electronic collection equipment, and multibillion dollar space surveillance programs. Even at the tactical level, Army intelligence personnel are trained primarily to employ a variety of high tech collection means including UAVs, sensors and ground radars. This approach to intelligence collection was appropriate when the intelligence priorities were geared to counting Soviet missile systems or defending the Fulda Gap against a massive Soviet tank attack."
    • Published On: 5/1/2004
  •  This is Not Your Father's, or Mother's Army!

    This is Not Your Father's, or Mother's Army!

    This is Not Your Father's, or Mother's Army! Dr Douglas V Johnson II Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "It would probably strike the average observer as odd or even irrational for the Army to reorganize just as it engages in war, but that seems to be normal for the American Army. In at least three wars, that is exactly what has happened and it is happening again. Had you been an infantry company commander on April 1, 1917, you would have commanded a company of about 58 soldiers armed with 1903 Springfield rifles. By July of that year the company would be 250 strong and equipped with Springfield or possibly British Enfield rifles, heavy and light machineguns, mortars, hand and rifle grenades, and a host of other devices of war new or previously unknown to the U.S. Army."
    • Published On: 4/1/2004
  •  Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror

    Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror

    Debating Ends, not Just Means, in the War on Terror Dr Stephen D Biddle Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The national security debate tends to focus on means. How much money should we spend? Where should we use force? How should our troops be equipped? Ends, however, ought to shape decisions about means. Yet the ends of American national security usually get less attention than the means. As the nation debates national security in this time of war, what critical questions about the ends of American strategy should we be considering?"
    • Published On: 3/1/2004
  •  Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia

    Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia

    Toward a New U.S. Strategy in Asia Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Uzbekistan has announced that it will offer U.S. forces a base for operations in Afghanistan, and that it does not rule out the possibility of a permanent base if needed. The importance of this cannot be overestimated. Both Russia and China hoped America's incursion into Central Asia was temporary and would end when the terrorism threat abated. Instead, it appears the United States will remain a major player there, not only countering terrorism but also maintaining access to large energy deposits, preserving options for democratizing these states, and establishing a global power projection capability."
    • Published On: 2/1/2004
  •  An American Way of War or a Way of Battle?

    An American Way of War or a Way of Battle?

    An American Way of War or a Way of Battle? Dr Antulio J Echevarria II Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Serious study of the American approach to waging war began in the early 1970s with the publication of Russell Weigley’s The American Way of War: A History of U.S. Military Strategy and Policy. Examining how war was thought about and practiced by key U.S. military and political figures from George Washington to Robert McNamara, Weigley concluded that, except in the early days of the nation’s existence, the American way of war centered on the desire to achieve a “crushing” military victory—either through a strategy of attrition or one of annihilation—over an adversary."
    • Published On: 1/1/2004
  •  The Trajectory of Security Transformation

    The Trajectory of Security Transformation

    The Trajectory of Security Transformation Dr Steven Metz Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For a decade now, a historic revolution in military affairs has unfolded, driven largely by technological developments. Within the U. S. military, immense effort has been expended to understand this revolution and harness it into security transformation. A network of organizations, institutions, and individual experts emerged to shape and energize this process. The result has been the most rigorous and sustained security transformation in human history."
    • Published On: 12/1/2003
  •  Expanding the Use of State Defense Forces in Homeland Defense Missions

    Expanding the Use of State Defense Forces in Homeland Defense Missions

    Expanding the Use of State Defense Forces in Homeland Defense Missions LTC Brent C Bankus Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Current high operational tempo of the active force and the federalized reserves makes it difficult to find adequate numbers of forces to accomplish the many homeland defense missions. As planners attempt to apply the right forces to the proper mission, they need to consider State Defense Forces (SDFs). Planners may be unaware of these forces’ existence; however, they represent an important source of capable manpower to apply within the borders of the various states in the Global War on Terrorism."
    • Published On: 11/1/2003
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