Strategy & Policy

 
  •  Refining American Strategy in Africa

    Refining American Strategy in Africa

    Refining American Strategy in Africa Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Traditionally, the United States has not been a major player in the security environment of Sub-Saharan Africa, relying instead on European nations to provide outside assistance to African states. Today, it is appropriate to rethink this neglect. Africa is undergoing vast political, social, and economic changes. A consistent and well-designed American strategy in the region could help tilt the scales in favor of security and stability."
    • Published On: 2/1/2000
  •  Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc?

    Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc?

    Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc? Prof Anthony H Cordesman Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "There is no doubt that the Middle East can present significant potential threats to the West. The author of this monograph examines these threats in order to put them into perspective—to distinguish between “crying wolf” and “crying havoc.” After thorough analysis, he contends that the problems caused by narcotics and organized crime, immigration, terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction do not as yet require draconian action by the Western nations. However, he asserts that if the threats of Middle Eastern terrorism and proliferation were to be combined into super-terrorism, the result would create a new form of asymmetric warfare for which the West is singularly ill-prepared."
    • Published On: 5/31/1999
  •  Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices

    Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices

    Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices Dr Thomas-Durell Young Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since the unification of Germany on October 3, 1990, the question of how Bonn will conduct its foreign and defense policies continues to be posited. Gone are the days when Paris "led" Western Europe and the Federal Republic of Germany tacitly accepted its supporting role. The Federal Republic now has all the composite elements to be a Great Power, with the exception of its own nuclear arsenal. Nonetheless, Bonn possesses the largest economy and population in Western and Central Europe, and plans to maintain the largest peacetime military establishment east of the Bug River. Even if Germany were to eschew any Great Power ambitions, it no longer has the luxury of denying either to itself or its allies that it does have important international responsibilities to which it must be prepared to contribute."
    • Published On: 12/1/1996
  •  The Strategist and the Web Revisited: An Updated Guide to Internet Resources

    The Strategist and the Web Revisited: An Updated Guide to Internet Resources

    The Strategist and the Web Revisited: An Updated Guide to Internet Resources LTC James Kievit, Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For analysts or planners attempting to craft appropriate, timely solutions to strategic problems, the ability to collect information rapidly and to evaluate its relevance and validity is a crucial skill. Computers linked via the Internet can offer timely access to millions of documents and files on a vast range of topics, and the number of documents available increases on a daily basis. But to make maximum use of the Internet as a research tool, researchers must understand it. And analysts trained in library, archive, and word-of-mouth research must learn where to look for salient electronic information."
    • Published On: 10/17/1996
  •  International Politics in Northeast Asia: The China-Japan-United States Strategic Triangle

    International Politics in Northeast Asia: The China-Japan-United States Strategic Triangle

    International Politics in Northeast Asia: The China-Japan-United States Strategic Triangle Dr Thomas L Wilborn Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The United States has vital security and economic interests in Northeast Asia, one of the most dynamic regions of the world. This monograph focuses on the three bilateral relationships, those connecting China, Japan, and the United States to each other, which will dominate the future of the region. Dr. Thomas Wilborn analyzes these relations, taking into account key issues involving Taiwan and North Korea, and offers insights regarding their future course. He also reviews U.S. engagement policy and assesses the value of U.S. military presence for regional stability."
    • Published On: 3/21/1996
  •  The Strategist and the Web: Guide to Internet Resources

    The Strategist and the Web: Guide to Internet Resources

    The Strategist and the Web: Guide to Internet Resources LTC James Kievit, Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The Strategist and the Web provides an Internet "Primer"--an introductory road map of the 'net explaining its most important features: the World-Wide Web, news groups, and electronic mail ("email"). Then it examines numerous Internet sources. From these it identifies both sites of current value to a strategic analyst, and those with the potential to become important resources after further development."
    • Published On: 2/1/1996
  •  Strategic Implications for the United States and Latin America of the 1995 Ecuador-Peru War

    Strategic Implications for the United States and Latin America of the 1995 Ecuador-Peru War

    Strategic Implications for the United States and Latin America of the 1995 Ecuador-Peru War Dr Gabriel Marcella, Department of National Security and Strategy Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "One of the more serious dangers to peace and security in Latin America is the territorial dispute between Ecuador and Peru, which broke out into warfare in February-March 1995. In this monograph, Dr. Gabriel Marcella explores the critical historical and strategic dimensions of the conflict. He argues that unless this age-old dispute is settled amicably and soon, it could very well generate a more disastrous war in the future. Dr. Marcella proposes a basis for settlement and provides specific policy recommendations for the United States and the inter-American community."
    • Published On: 11/24/1995
  •  Strategic Plans, Joint Doctrine and Antipodean Insights

    Strategic Plans, Joint Doctrine and Antipodean Insights

    Strategic Plans, Joint Doctrine and Antipodean Insights Prof Douglas C Lovelace Jr, Dr Thomas-Durell Young Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This is the second in an analytical series on joint issues. It follows the authors’ U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Planning: The Missing Nexus, in which they articulated the need for more formal joint strategic plans. This essay examines the effect such plans would have on joint doctrine development and illustrates the potential benefits evident in Australian defense planning."
    • Published On: 10/20/1995
  •  Strategic Art: The New Discipline for 21st Century Leaders

    Strategic Art: The New Discipline for 21st Century Leaders

    Strategic Art: The New Discipline for 21st Century Leaders LTG Richard A Chilcoat Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute
    • Published On: 10/10/1995
  •  U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Planning: The Missing Nexus

    U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Planning: The Missing Nexus

    U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Planning: The Missing Nexus Prof Douglas C Lovelace Jr, Dr Thomas-Durell Young Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This is the pilot in a series of reports on strategic planning conducted within the U.S. Department of Defense. It focuses on the strategic planning responsibilities of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff because planning at that level provides the critical nexus between the strategic direction provided by the National Command Authorities and its implementation by the unified combatant commands and military departments. The authors’ thorough understanding of the statutory requirements for strategic planning and the interactions between the Chairman’s complex strategic planning process and other key DOD planning systems enables them to explicate today’s strategic planning challenges and offer insightful recommendations."
    • Published On: 9/1/1995
  •  The Principles of War in the 21st Century: Strategic Considerations

    The Principles of War in the 21st Century: Strategic Considerations

    The Principles of War in the 21st Century: Strategic Considerations Dr William T Johnsen, Dr Douglas V Johnson II, LTC James Kievit, Prof Douglas C Lovelace Jr, Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Throughout history, military practitioners, philosophers, and historians have struggled to comprehend the complexities of warfare. Most of these efforts produced long, complicated treatises that did not lend themselves to rapid or easy understanding. This, in turn, spurred efforts to condense the "lessons" of war into a short list of aphorisms that practitioners of the military art could use to guide the conduct of warfare."
    • Published On: 8/1/1995
  •  Strategy and the Revolution in Military Affairs: From Theory to Policy

    Strategy and the Revolution in Military Affairs: From Theory to Policy

    Strategy and the Revolution in Military Affairs: From Theory to Policy LTC James Kievit, Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "A small band of “RMA” analysts has emerged in the military and Department of Defense, in the academic strategic studies community, and in defense-related think-tanks and consulting firms. To these analysts, the Gulf War provided a vision of a potential revolution in military affairs (RMA) in which “Information Age” technology would be combined with appropriate doctrine and training to allow a small but very advanced U.S. military to protect national interests with unprecedented efficiency."
    • Published On: 6/27/1995
  •  NATO Strategy in the 1990s: Reaping the Peace Dividend or the Whirlwind?

    NATO Strategy in the 1990s: Reaping the Peace Dividend or the Whirlwind?

    NATO Strategy in the 1990s: Reaping the Peace Dividend or the Whirlwind? Dr William T Johnsen Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In November 1991, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization released "The Alliance's New Strategic Concept" (hereafter Strategic Concept), the first significant revision of NATO strategy since the Alliance adopted the strategy of Flexible Response in 1967. In this new document, NATO acknowledged the dramatic improvements in the European security environment, and positioned the Alliance for the post-Cold War era. Since 1991, the Strategic Concept has guided NATO as it absorbed a unified Germany, massively reduced allied forces, partially overhauled its command and control structures, undertook peace operations in the former Yugoslavia under the aegis of the U.N., conducted combat operations for the first time in its history, and started to tackle the difficult question of enlarging the Alliance."
    • Published On: 5/25/1995
  •  Counterinsurgency: Strategy and the Phoenix of American Capability

    Counterinsurgency: Strategy and the Phoenix of American Capability

    Counterinsurgency: Strategy and the Phoenix of American Capability Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this study, Steven Metz argues that the way the Department of Defense and U.S. military spend the time when counterinsurgency support is not an important part of American national security strategy determines how quickly and easily they react when policymakers commit the nation to such activity. If analysis and debate continues, at least at a low level, the military is better prepared for the reconstitution of capabilities. If it ignores global developments in insurgency and counterinsurgency, the reconstitution of capabilities would be more difficult."
    • Published On: 2/1/1995
  •  Haiti Strategy: Control, Legitimacy, Sovereignty, Rule of Law, Handoffs, and Exit

    Haiti Strategy: Control, Legitimacy, Sovereignty, Rule of Law, Handoffs, and Exit

    Haiti Strategy: Control, Legitimacy, Sovereignty, Rule of Law, Handoffs, and Exit Dr Gabriel Marcella Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Now that the armed forces of the United States have entered Haiti, what is the exit strategy? As the United States, the government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and the United Nations coalition establish order, it is best to be mindful of the tasks ahead: building a new authority system based on the rule of law, instilling respect for human rights, and developing those values common to democratic communities around the world. The two keys to the success of this strategy will be how Haiti handles the amnesty question and what kind of judicial and police system is developed."
    • Published On: 10/20/1994
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