Letort Papers

 
  •  Reforming the Police in Post-Soviet States: Georgia and Kyrgyzstan

    Reforming the Police in Post-Soviet States: Georgia and Kyrgyzstan

    Reforming the Police in Post-Soviet States: Georgia and Kyrgyzstan Dr Erica Marat Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In most Soviet successor states, the police (militia) are among the least trusted government agencies. The police are frequently seen as representatives of the state who are allowed to persecute ordinary citizens, extort bribes, and protect the real criminals. This leads to cycles of mutual antagonism in which society does not expect the police to perform their function properly, and the police are unable to enforce state regulation of society. In the examples of Georgia and Kyrgyzstan in this monograph, Dr. Erica Marat examines which domestic processes will likely fail and which have a chance to succeed in changing the post-Soviet police from a punitive institution into a more democratic entity. "
    • Published On: 11/1/2013
  •  The Real "Long War": The Illicit Drug Trade and the Role of the Military

    The Real "Long War": The Illicit Drug Trade and the Role of the Military

    The Real "Long War": The Illicit Drug Trade and the Role of the Military Prof Geoffrey Till Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Since the end of the Cold War, for the United States and everyone else, the concept of security has widened enormously. It has moved far beyond the confines of national defense against military threats from other nation states, incorporating threats ranging from transnational criminality, through cyber attack, international terrorism, and aggression from rogue and other hostile states. This poses increasing challenges to the world’s militaries, especially those also grappling with the consequences of reduced financial support. It raises the question of choice and priority. How should the United States allocate its priorities and resources, for example, between the worst kind of threat the nation faces and the most likely?"
    • Published On: 9/1/2013
  •  An Assessment of the DoD Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace

    An Assessment of the DoD Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace

    An Assessment of the DoD Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace Dr Thomas M Chen Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In some ways, the cyber domain is quite different from the traditional operational domains of air, land, sea, and space. Cyber threats are stealthy and difficult to attribute; critical infrastructures are difficult to defend against unseen and unpredictable adversaries. The 2011 Department of Defense (DoD) Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace was a significant policy statement for publicly embracing cyberspace as an operational domain and declaring a number of strategic initiatives to maintain U.S. security in the face of emerging cyber threats. In this monograph, Dr. Thomas Chen explains the strategies as they have evolved from previous national strategies and examines each strategy critically for clarity, comprehensiveness, and novelty. "
    • Published On: 9/1/2013
  •  The Security Concerns of the Baltic States as NATO Allies

    The Security Concerns of the Baltic States as NATO Allies

    The Security Concerns of the Baltic States as NATO Allies Dr James S Corum Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The end of the Cold War in the early-1990s signified a huge and very positive transformation in world politics. Nations that had been Warsaw Pact enemies for 5 decades became, almost overnight, allies of the West. Even nations that had been republics of the Soviet Union—the best examples being Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania—moved immediately to become staunch Western allies. The full post-Cold War transformation was consummated in 2004 when the three formerly Soviet Baltic republics, along with some former Warsaw Pact nations, became new members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)."
    • Published On: 8/1/2013
  •  Cartel Car Bombings in Mexico

    Cartel Car Bombings in Mexico

    Cartel Car Bombings in Mexico Dr Robert J Bunker, Mr John P Sullivan Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Improvised explosive devices and car bombs have long been identified as threats to U.S. Army personnel deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. They have gained considerable attention and notoriety, even infamy, among our troops, who have had to learn the appropriate responses and countermeasures to contend with the fielding of these systems against them. Far less recognized is the fact that a similar threat—embodied in car bombs—has emerged much closer to our homeland within Mexico. Since mid-2010, cartel car bombings have taken place in a country on our southern border and have been targeted against both the forces of opposing cartels and those belonging to Mexican military and law enforcement agencies. "
    • Published On: 8/1/2013
  •  AFRICOM at 5 Years: The Maturation of a New U.S. Combatant Command

    AFRICOM at 5 Years: The Maturation of a New U.S. Combatant Command

    AFRICOM at 5 Years: The Maturation of a New U.S. Combatant Command Mr David E Brown Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), the newest of the six U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) geographic combatant commands (CCMDs), was created in 2007 amid great controversy in both Africa and the United States over its location and mission. Over the last 5 years, AFRICOM has matured greatly, overcome much of the initial resistance from African stakeholders, and addressed most U.S. interagency concerns about the Command’s size and proper role within the U.S. national security/foreign policy community. AFRICOM is a CCMD Plus, because it also has: 1) a broader soft power mandate aimed at building a stable security environment; and, 2) a relatively larger personnel contingent from other U.S. Government agencies."
    • Published On: 8/1/2013
  •  Russian Interests in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Russian Interests in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Russian Interests in Sub-Saharan Africa Mr Keir Giles Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Competition for resources, political influence, and access to markets will continue to increase among global powers as finite resources continue to dwindle. Russia is fully aware of this and has begun to look outside established power centers such as Europe and the West toward Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa is a hub of undeveloped natural resources, a nest of conflict to fuel potential arms sales, and an area ripe for cultivation of political support for Russian interests on the world stage."
    • Published On: 7/1/2013
  •  The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Libya: Reviewing Operation Unified Protector

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Libya: Reviewing Operation Unified Protector

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Libya: Reviewing Operation Unified Protector Dr Florence Gaub Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) military action in Libya was a first in many ways—the Alliance’s first combat operation against an Arab country; the first time the United States “led from behind”; and the first time the concept of Responsibility to Protect was applied to support Libya’s civilian population against a murderous regime. The action is also considered, militarily speaking, a success, and has inspired confidence in those who were doubtful after the Alliance’s patchy Afghanistan experience."
    • Published On: 6/28/2013
  •  Joint Strategic Planning System Insights: Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff 1990 to 2012

    Joint Strategic Planning System Insights: Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff 1990 to 2012

    Joint Strategic Planning System Insights: Chairmen Joint Chiefs of Staff 1990 to 2012 Dr Richard M Meinhart Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Military leaders at many levels have used strategic planning in various ways to position their organizations to respond to the demands of the current situation, while simultaneously preparing to meet future challenges. This Letort Paper examines how the different Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1990 to 2012 used a strategic planning system to enable them to meet their formal leadership responsibilities as outlined in Title 10 U.S. Code. As such, it provides an historic perspective in assessing the different Chairmen’s leadership legacies in using and modifying their strategic planning system. It also has a contemporary focus as it describes the planning system’s current processes and products."
    • Published On: 6/1/2013
  •  Avoiding the Slippery Slope: Conducting Effective Interventions

    Avoiding the Slippery Slope: Conducting Effective Interventions

    Avoiding the Slippery Slope: Conducting Effective Interventions Dr Thomas R Mockaitis Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has intervened in the affairs of sovereign states on several occasions by using military force. A combination of humanitarian sentiments and practical policy considerations motivated both Democratic and Republican presidents to become involved in civil wars and humanitarian crises. These interventions met with mixed results, and even the most successful missions encountered serious problems. Improving the conduct of such interventions requires understanding these past operations as well as considering conflicts in which the United States chose not to intervene."
    • Published On: 6/1/2013
  •  Return of the Balkans: Challenges to European Integration and U.S. Disengagement

    Return of the Balkans: Challenges to European Integration and U.S. Disengagement

    Return of the Balkans: Challenges to European Integration and U.S. Disengagement Mr Janusz Bugajski Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This Letort Paper assesses the prospects for further turbulence and conflict in the Western Balkans and weighs the implications for U.S. policy and for potential future military engagement. Although the region has slipped off the American radar screen in recent years, several unresolved disputes have the potential of escalating. This Paper systematically describes numerous causes of domestic and regional tensions and outlines a number of conflict scenarios."
    • Published On: 5/1/2013
  •  The Challenge of Drug Trafficking to Democratic Governance and Human Security in West Africa

    The Challenge of Drug Trafficking to Democratic Governance and Human Security in West Africa

    The Challenge of Drug Trafficking to Democratic Governance and Human Security in West Africa Mr David E Brown Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "...Mr. Brown’s Letort Paper describes how West Africa is under attack from international criminal networks that are using the subregion as a key global hub for the distribution, wholesale, and increasing production of illicit drugs, most prominently cocaine, but also heroin and amphetamines and their precursors. While West African states have made remarkable progress in democratic and economic development over the past decade, the insidious effects of narcotics trafficking have the potential to reverse many of these gains..."
    • Published On: 5/1/2013
  •  From Chaos to Cohesion: A Regional Approach to Security, Stability, and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    From Chaos to Cohesion: A Regional Approach to Security, Stability, and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    From Chaos to Cohesion: A Regional Approach to Security, Stability, and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa Ms Diane E Chido Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Conflicts and extremism are almost certain to continue to rise in Africa, especially with instability resulting from the cascade of unrest across North Africa and the Middle East, the burgeoning youth bulge in Sub-Saharan Africa, African mercenaries, rising Islamic extremism, myriad wild, ungoverned spaces, and increasing resource shortages resulting from human activities and climate change across the Continent. In order to protect our troops while ensuring stability in the region, we must develop the capacity of a Pan-African force to deal effectively with these and other likely problems as they arise."
    • Published On: 4/1/2013
  •  Talking Past Each Other? How Views of U.S. Power Vary between U.S. and International Military Personnel

    Talking Past Each Other? How Views of U.S. Power Vary between U.S. and International Military Personnel

    Talking Past Each Other? How Views of U.S. Power Vary between U.S. and International Military Personnel COL Richard H M Outzen Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This Paper addresses the question of whether anecdotally observed friction between U.S. military personnel and their international partners stems from underlying bias or other factors that cannot be practically remedied. After providing a backdrop of the types of friction that have been observed, and that seem to be escalating, the Paper examines alternative theoretical explanations for such friction. The friction mirrors, in a sense, the broader sharpening of anti-U.S. sentiment observed throughout much of the globe over the past decade. There are two broad explanatory approaches: the friction and sentiment stem from who we are and are thus immutable; or they stem from discrete actions and policies, and thus may be ameliorated to some degree."
    • Published On: 2/1/2013
  •  Beyond the Battlefield: Institutional Army Transformation Following Victory in Iraq

    Beyond the Battlefield: Institutional Army Transformation Following Victory in Iraq

    Beyond the Battlefield: Institutional Army Transformation Following Victory in Iraq LTC G Scott Taylor Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army goes to great lengths to capture lessons learned and preserve these lessons for current practitioners and future generations. Though the Army is one of the most self-critical organizations found in American society, a well-deserved reputation has also been earned for failing to inculcate those lessons by transforming the institutional Army. Change is achieved through a continuous cycle of adaptive innovation, experimentation, and experience. In Iraq, out of necessity while in contact with a dynamic enemy, the Army transformed on the battlefield with radical changes in doctrine, organization, training, and materiel, which significantly enabled battlefield success."
    • Published On: 11/1/2012
Page 3 of 10