Books

 

  •  Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm

    Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm

    Revising the Two MTW Force Shaping Paradigm Dr Steven Metz Strategic Alternatives Report by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since the early 1990s, U.S. military strategy has called for a force able to fight and win two nearly-simultaneous major theater wars (MTWs). An MTW was something similar to Operation DESERT STORM—a large-scale conventional war in Eurasia against an aggressive regional power involving substantial American forces from all services and, most likely, allies or coalition partners. While policymakers and planners admitted that the outbreak of two nearly simultaneous MTWs was unlikely, they felt that a military able to deal with such a challenge would also be sufficient for other likely missions and tasks."
    • Published On: 4/1/2001
  •  U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy Dr Joseph R Cerami, COL James F Holcomb Jr Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Advice to strategists comes in many forms. Kennedy and Gaddis’s thoughts expressed above are representative of most scholars, statesmen, and generals—strategy is a critical subject for senior leaders. George Marshall expressed concerns, late in his distinguished career, that as a statesman he had to learn a “whole new set of skills.” Theater strategists, like Field Marshall Slim, have written that senior leaders must learn how to “think big.” Important books on the subject stress an in depth knowledge of history, economics, politics, geography, culture, and so on. For a concept that remains hard to define, the study of strategy remains a complex subject of lifelong learning for scholars, statesmen, and soldiers alike."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Planning for a Peaceful Korea

    Planning for a Peaceful Korea

    Planning for a Peaceful Korea Mr Henry D Sokolski Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "As a new millennium dawns over the Korean peninsula, millenary hopes and expectations are very much in evidence among students of Korean affairs. Half a century after the surprise attack that launched the Korean War, almost 5 decades into the continuing high-tension military standoff that has followed the 1953 Korean War ceasefire, there is suddenly a pervasive and growing anticipation that this tormented and divided nation may now be on the threshold of a new and momentous era: an era of genuine peace, in which the “Cold War structure on the Korean peninsula” is at last dismantled, and a reconciliation between the antagonist governments based in Pyongyang (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or DPRK) and Seoul (the Republic of Korea, or ROK) commences in earnest."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts Dr Douglas V Johnson II, Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute: "In war, there are always differences between the opponents. At times these are insignificant, passing disparities with no bearing on the outcome. At other times, the differences between opponents are important, placing one in a position of advantage, the other at a disadvantage. This is a very simple observation, but from it flows one of the pressing issues faced by the United States today: strategic asymmetry."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications

    The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications

    The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since 1995, peace operations in the Balkans have been an important part of the Army’s contribution to U.S. national security. When these operations began, the Army institutionally focused on conventional warfighting. Since then, it has made significant changes to become more effective at peace operations, but this evolution continues. The goals that led the United States into the Balkans have not yet been fully realized. To meet them requires both sustained involvement in the region and continued refinement of the Army’s peace operations capabilities."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States

    Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States

    Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States Dr Conrad C Crane Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army War College and the Georgetown University Center for Peace and Security Studies, along with its National Security Studies Program, cosponsored a conference in Washington, DC on September 21, 2000, to examine the issues that will shape future American defense policy. Discussion panels were structured to identify the questions, issues, and schisms likely to shape the upcoming Quadrennial Defense Review. Among the 160 attendees registered for the conference were representatives from the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) offices for all the Services and the Joint Staff, as well as defense experts from other government agencies, private industry, and academia."
    • Published On: 12/1/2000
  •  Organizing for National Security

    Organizing for National Security

    Organizing for National Security Dr Douglas Stuart Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army War College chose the theme of “Organizing for National Security” for its Tenth Annual Strategy Conference in order to contribute to the upcoming debate about institutional reform. This volume provides a summary of the proceedings of that conference. It includes historical, analytical, and prescriptive articles relating to the national security bureaucracy. "
    • Published On: 11/1/2000
  •  Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies

    Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies

    Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies Dr Carolyn Pumphrey Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "On February 2-3, 2000, the U.S. Army War College, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, and the Duke University Center for Law, Ethics, and National Security co-sponsored a conference in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference examined transnational threats, including terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction, cyber threats to the national infrastructure, and international organized crime. The goal was to evaluate the seriousness of such threats and discuss strategies for dealing with them. In particular, the conference sought to address the question of how military and law enforcement could blend their strategies to better counter transnational threats. A secondary purpose was to clarify the role of the military in meeting challenges that transcend national borders and threaten our national interests."
    • Published On: 11/1/2000
  •  American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review

    American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review

    American Strategy: Issues and Alternatives for the Quadrennial Defense Review Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Because of the confluence of the congressionally mandated Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and a presidential election, the years 2000 and 2001 are likely to be important in the evolution of American military strategy. Basic strategic concepts and alternatives will be debated and analyzed. The results will shape U.S. strategy for several decades. This study provides a brief history of the evolution of American military strategy since the end of the Cold War, delineates the key issues which are likely to shape the upcoming QDR process, and assesses a range of strategic alternatives."
    • Published On: 9/1/2000
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