Recent Articles

 
  •  The Future of Transcaspian Security

    The Future of Transcaspian Security

    The Future of Transcaspian Security Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph explores the unprecedented opportunities that are now before the United States and recommends actions that the Government and armed forces, especially, but not only the U.S. Army, should undertake to consolidate and extend the newly emerging military partnership and cooperative security regime that are now developing. Because the opportunities being presented to the United States and NATO were never possible before to this degree, the proper way to exploit them will become a subject of debate."
    • Published On: 8/1/2002
  •  A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power

    A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power

    A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power COL Joseph R Nunez Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph by Colonel Joseph R. Núñez is a constructive response to the question of “How can the United States best develop security cooperation within the Americas?” In it, he develops the necessary background to make the persuasive argument that it is time for the United States to employ strategic restraint and reassurance of allies to develop a new security architecture that is effective and efficient, not to mention reflecting of our values and interests."
    • Published On: 8/1/2002
  •  Pax NATO: The Opportunities of Enlargement

    Pax NATO: The Opportunities of Enlargement

    Pax NATO: The Opportunities of Enlargement LTC Raymond A Millen Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Considering its long string of successes, it is curious that NATO has so many critics chanting the mantra of irrelevancy or decrying its post-Cold War initiatives. Paradoxically, pan-Europeanists seem quite willing to accept an ineffective security organization as long as it has a European label on it. Applying parochial protectionist practices on regional security may be irrevocable and certainly ruinous."
    • Published On: 8/1/2002
  •  Fourth Anton Myrer Strategic Leadership Conference: A 'Leadership During Crisis' Workshop

    Fourth Anton Myrer Strategic Leadership Conference: A 'Leadership During Crisis' Workshop

    Fourth Anton Myrer Strategic Leadership Conference: A 'Leadership During Crisis' Workshop COL Gregory A Adams, Michael H Crutcher, Prof James O Kievit, Thomas W Sweeney Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The September 2001 at tacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon vividly demonstrated that responding to a major crisis is not solely the concern of the military or the national security community or even of fire and police protection agencies. Indeed, there are many types of crises that can threaten not only the well-being of governmental, civil, and business organizations and population at various levels, but also their very existence."
    • Published On: 7/15/2002
  •  Business and Security in a Wired World

    Business and Security in a Wired World

    Business and Security in a Wired World Dennis M Murphy Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The U.S. Army War College (USAWC) Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) con ducted a “Business Security in a Wired World” seminar in Rye, New York on 24-25 April 2002. Participants in the event included business executives representing critical infrastructure segments, government officials, and executives of two industry associations. The College’s objective in the session was to obtain a better understanding of private sector concerns for information assurance and homeland security."
    • Published On: 7/15/2002
  •  Central African Security: Conflict in the Congo

    Central African Security: Conflict in the Congo

    Central African Security: Conflict in the Congo Arthur L Bradshaw, Dr Kent H Butts Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "On September 18 and 19, 2001, the National Intelligence Council, the Defense Intelligence Agency, and the Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) of the United States Army War College conducted a two-day workshop on African security issues focusing on the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The conference began at 1200 hours on September 18th and concluded at noon on September 19th at the Collins Center U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania."
    • Published On: 7/1/2002
  •  The Collins Center Update Vol 4, Issue 3: April-June, 2002

    The Collins Center Update Vol 4, Issue 3: April-June, 2002

    The Collins Center Update Vol 4, Issue 3: April-June, 2002 Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 6/15/2002
  •  Strengthening the Bonds of Environmental Cooperation Between Security Forces and Environmental Institutions

    Strengthening the Bonds of Environmental Cooperation Between Security Forces and Environmental Institutions

    Strengthening the Bonds of Environmental Cooperation Between Security Forces and Environmental Institutions Prof Bernard F Griffard Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Building trust and cooperation between the military and civilian sectors in the nations of South America’s southern cone is an essential step in their continuing maturation as democracies. During most of the 20th Century, a state of tension existed between these two sectors because of the role played by the military as either the primary enforcement instrument of the ruling oligarchy, or as the actual government in being. Today, in order to set the conditions for continued growth and stability, these two sectors must cooperate both nationally and multilaterally in order to build confidence in the government and to promote regional stability. The vehicle chosen to encourage this necessary dialogue is environmental security and its adjunct of disaster response planning."
    • Published On: 6/15/2002
  •  Central American Environmental Defense Program in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor

    Central American Environmental Defense Program in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor

    Central American Environmental Defense Program in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor Arthur L Bradshaw, Dr Kent H Butts, Prof Bernard F Griffard Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "One of the greatest conservation efforts ever undertaken on a worldwide level is the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. Crossing eight national borders this program aims to protect existing ecosystems, while at the same time promoting sustainable development projects that help to alleviate poverty in the region."
    • Published On: 6/15/2002
  •  Tweaking NATO: The Case for Integrated Multinational Divisions

    Tweaking NATO: The Case for Integrated Multinational Divisions

    Tweaking NATO: The Case for Integrated Multinational Divisions LTC Raymond A Millen Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In 1931, General of the Army Douglas MacArthur penned the following thoughts on innovation: “We must hold our minds alert and receptive to the application of unglimpsed methods and weapons. The next war will be won in the future, not in the past. We must go on, or we will go under.” As the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) adapts to the emerging strategic environment, it must consider innovative organizational structures that will allow it to harness the potential of its European partners."
    • Published On: 6/1/2002
  •  Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin

    Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin

    Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin Dr Kent H Butts, COL Jeffrey C Reynolds Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Central Asian region encompasses Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. These newly independent republics, as well as the Transcaucasus states of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, have become increasingly important to the United States’ national security interests. Decades of mineral exploitation, inefficient water use, and environmental neglect have left the region scarred—this environmental damage continues to threaten the stability of these new nations. Environmental Security has the potential to become a catalyst for multilateral cooperation and a powerful enabler for U.S. regional policy and security interests."
    • Published On: 5/15/2002
  •  Responding to Terror: A Report on the U.S. Army War College Consequence Management Symposium

    Responding to Terror: A Report on the U.S. Army War College Consequence Management Symposium

    Responding to Terror: A Report on the U.S. Army War College Consequence Management Symposium COL Jeffrey C Reynolds, Prof Bert B Tussing Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Consequence Management Symposium was conducted by the Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL), at the Collins Center, United States Army War College on August 21-23, 2001. It was co-sponsored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). The purpose of the conference was to contribute to the ongoing debate over domestic defense, and to identify opportunities and approaches to solutions in this area of vital national interest."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
  •  China and Strategic Culture

    China and Strategic Culture

    China and Strategic Culture Dr Andrew Scobell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author of this monograph, Dr. Andrew Scobell, examines the impact of strategic culture on 21st century China. He contends that the People’s Republic of China’s security policies and its tendency to use military force are influenced not only by elite understandings of China’s own strategic tradition, but also by their understandings of the strategic cultures of other states."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
  •  Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response

    Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response

    Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Global political violence is clashing with global economic integration. More often than not, the causes and consequences of the resultant instabilities tend to be exploited by such destabilizers as rogue states, substate and transnational political actors, insurgents, illegal drug traffickers, organized criminals, warlords, ethnic cleansers, militant fundamentalists, and 1,000 other “snakes with a cause” and the will to conduct terrorist and other asymmetric warfare. The intent is to impose self-determined desires for “change” on a society, nation-state, and/or other perceived symbols of power in the global community—and, perhaps, revert to the questionable glories of the 12th century."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
  •  Facing the Hydra: Maintaining Strategic Balance while Pursuing a Global War against Terrorism

    Facing the Hydra: Maintaining Strategic Balance while Pursuing a Global War against Terrorism

    Facing the Hydra: Maintaining Strategic Balance while Pursuing a Global War against Terrorism Dr Conrad C Crane Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Dr. Conrad Crane analyzes the impact of the war on terrorism and the requirements of the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review on the many essential missions conducted by the U.S. Armed Forces. Focusing primarily on the Army, he highlights the requirements associated with combat operations against terrorists, accelerating transformation and the new emphasis on homeland security and force protection. At the same time, he points out that the Army and the other Services must remain involved worldwide in day-to-day assurance, dissuasion, and deterrence activities; execution of peace operations and other smaller-scale contingencies; and remaining ready for other major combat operations."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
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