Strategy & Policy

 
  •  Key Strategic Issues List 2018-2020

    Key Strategic Issues List 2018-2020

    Key Strategic Issues List 2018-2020 Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "As our National Security Strategy and National Defense Strategy acknowledge, Russia, China, North Korea, Iran, and radical violent extremist organizations pose extant and potential challenges to U.S. national security. Those challenges exist within an extraordinarily complex global security environment characterized by dynamic changes in technology and its application, profound demographic shifts, economic redistribution and distortion, and geostrategic power realignments of historic proportions. These ever-intensifying conditions produce increasing uncertainty concerning the prospects for world peace, stability, and prosperity. Some strategists opine that the potential for great power interstate conflict is higher now than at any time since the end of the Cold War."
    • Published On: 8/14/2018
  •  Campaign Planning Handbook AY18

    Campaign Planning Handbook AY18

    Campaign Planning Handbook AY18 DMSPO Publication from the US Army War College, Department of Military Strategy, Planning, and Operations, School of Strategic Landpower "The purpose of this document is to assist United States Army War College students during the Theater Strategy and Campaigning (TSC) course. It also serves to assist commanders, planners, and other staff officers in combatant commands (CCMD), joint task forces (JTF), and service component commands. It supplements joint doctrine and contains elements of emerging doctrine as practiced globally by joint force commanders (JFCs). It portrays a way to apply doctrine and emerging doctrine at the higher levels of joint command, with a primary emphasis at the combatant command level."
    • Published On: 2/27/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: Challenges in Using Scenario Planning for Defense Strategy

    Strategic Insights: Challenges in Using Scenario Planning for Defense Strategy

    Strategic Insights: Challenges in Using Scenario Planning for Defense Strategy Dr Michael Fitzsimmons Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 1/30/2018
  •  What Should the U.S. Army Learn From History? Recovery From a Strategy Deficit

    What Should the U.S. Army Learn From History? Recovery From a Strategy Deficit

    What Should the U.S. Army Learn From History? Recovery From a Strategy Deficit Dr Colin S Gray Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This monograph examines the potential utility of history as a source of education and possible guidance for the U.S. Army. The author considers the worth in the claim that since history (more accurately termed the past) is all done and gone, it can have no value for today as we try to look forward. This point of view did not find much favor here. The monograph argues that although history does not repeat itself in detail, it certainly does so roughly in parallel circumstances. Of course, much detail differs from one historical case to another, but nonetheless, there are commonly broad and possibly instructive parallels that can be drawn from virtually every period of history, concerning most circumstances."
    • Published On: 7/26/2017
  •  Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat Dr Jeffrey Record Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Why did the Axis Powers lose World War II, and what can we learn from its defeat? The Axis seemed on top of the world until 1941, when it added to its list of enemies the United States and the Soviet Union. The entry of Russia and America into the war decisively tipped the balance against Germany, Italy, and Japan. Resource-rich Russia and the United States were prepared for protracted conflict, whereas the Axis was not. From Pearl Harbor onward, it is difficult to imagine how the Axis could have avoided the fate that befell it, short of Stalin’s defection from the Allied side."
    • Published On: 7/13/2017
  •  Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace

    Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace

    Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace: The Cyber Sovereignty Workshop Series Cynthia E. Ayers "Recent successful "hacks," allegedly carried out by professionals acting on behalf of, or in concert with nation-states have heightened concerns about cyber warfare and sovereignty in the context of cyberspace. To maintain the integrity of U.S. and allied sovereign borders, it is imperative that security measures and defenses are coordinated and choreographed at the policy, strategy, and operational levels in the cyber domain, as well as in the physical world..."
    • Published On: 7/10/2017
  •  Project 1721: A U.S. Army War College Assessment on Russian Strategy in Eastern Europe and Recommendations on How to Leverage Landpower to Maintain the Peace

    Project 1721: A U.S. Army War College Assessment on Russian Strategy in Eastern Europe and Recommendations on How to Leverage Landpower to Maintain the Peace

    Project 1721: A U.S. Army War College Assessment on Russian Strategy in Eastern Europe and Recommendations on How to Leverage Landpower to Maintain the Peace COL Douglas Mastriano Publication by the US Army War College, Department of Command, Leadership, and Management, School of Strategic Landpower, US Army War College Press, Strategic Studies Institute "In early 2015, the U.S. Army War College (USAWC), at the request of the former Army Chief of Staff, General Raymond Odierno, published Project 1704, a study that discussed the changing strategic environment in Europe spawned by Russian aggression against Ukraine. The chief questions addressed by Project 1704 included: (1) What is the Russian strategy in the region? (2) What is the appropriate North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and U.S. response? (3) What are the implications for NATO and U.S. Landpower?"
    • Published On: 3/22/2017
  •  Campaign Planning Handbook AY17

    Campaign Planning Handbook AY17

    Campaign Planning Handbook AY17 COL Douglas W Bennett, COL Tarn D Warren Publication from the US Army War College, Department of Military Strategy, Planning, and Operations, School of Strategic Landpower "The purpose of this document is to assist United States Army War College students during the Theater Strategy and Campaigning (TSC) course. It also serves to assist commanders, planners, and other staff officers in combatant commands (CCMD), joint task forces (JTF), and service component commands. It supplements joint doctrine and contains elements of emerging doctrine as practiced globally by joint force commanders (JFCs). It portrays a way to apply doctrine and emerging doctrine at the higher levels of joint command, with a primary emphasis at the combatant command level."
    • Published On: 11/21/2016
  •  AY17 National Security Policy and Strategy Course Directive

    AY17 National Security Policy and Strategy Course Directive

    AY17 National Security Policy and Strategy Course Directive COL Robert E Hamilton, Dr Richard A Lacquement Jr Course Directive by the US Army War College "The National Security Policy and Strategy (NSPS) course focuses on national security policies and the strategies that put them into operation. It examines the elements that underpin national security policy and strategy, including the international and domestic environments, the American political system, national security policy and strategy formulation, the instruments of national power, and the processes employed by the United States Government for integrating and synchronizing those instruments to formulate national security policies and strategies in the pursuit of national security objectives..."
    • Published On: 10/21/2016
  •  Strategic Insights: Cyber (In)Security, the Americas, and U.S. National Security

    Strategic Insights: Cyber (In)Security, the Americas, and U.S. National Security

    Dr. Jose de Arimateia da Cruz Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press According to the Organization of American States (OAS) in its report on “Latin American and Caribbean Cyber Security Trends” released in June 2014, Latin America and the Caribbean have the fastest growing Internet population in the world with 147 million users in 2013 and growing each year. While having more users and more network connections are great advancements for traditional developing nations, they also represent a potential threat. Audrey Kurth Cronin points out that “insurgents and terrorist groups have effectively used the Internet to support their operations for at least a decade. The tools of the global information age have helped them with administrative tasks, coordination of operations, recruitment of potential members, and communications among adherents.” While much of the discussion regarding potential enemy attacks on U.S. cyber critical infrastructure mainly focuses on China, Russia, and Iran, the Americas have been largely ignored in the literature. Why are the Americas important? Why should we be discussing its place within the U.S. national security strategic goals?
    • Published On: 9/12/2016
  •  AY17 Theory of War and Strategy Course Directive

    AY17 Theory of War and Strategy Course Directive

    AY17 Theory of War and Strategy Course Directive Dr William T Johnsen, Dr Richard A Lacquement Jr Course Directive by the US Army War College "This course, which is the bedrock of the U.S. Army War College curriculum, introduces students to the theory of war and strategy. Theory, defined as a body of ideas and principles, provides a basis for the study of a particular subject and offers a framework within which professional discussions can occur. Theory generates and defines the common language that facilitates communication. It provides ways to think about issues. Theory also may provide advice on solving problems..."
    • Published On: 8/24/2016
  •  Strategic Insights: The Post-Conflict and the Transformation of Colombia’s Armed Forces

    Strategic Insights: The Post-Conflict and the Transformation of Colombia’s Armed Forces

    Strategic Insights: The Post-Conflict and the Transformation of Colombia’s Armed Forces Dr R Evan Ellis Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 8/17/2016
  •  The Pivot to Asia: Can it Serve as the Foundation for American Grand Strategy in the 21st Century

    The Pivot to Asia: Can it Serve as the Foundation for American Grand Strategy in the 21st Century

    The Pivot to Asia: Can it Serve as the Foundation for American Grand Strategy in the 21st Century Dr Douglas Stuart Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Establishing priorities is the indispensable core of strategy formulation. The Obama Administration’s decision to accord top priority to the Indo-Asia-Pacific (IAP) region made good strategic sense both in terms of the opportunities presented by the region’s unprecedented economic growth and the risks associated with the rapidly changing security environment in the IAP."
    • Published On: 8/1/2016
  •  2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List

    2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List

    2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List Professor John F. Troxell Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Russia, China, North Korea, Iran, and radical violent extremist organizations that currently challenge the U.S will likely continue to do so for some time. These security challenges exist within a wider global context of rapid technological change, significant demographic shifts, an uncertain economy, and geostrategic power dynamics of historic proportions. These conditions intensify the level of uncertainty and the pace of change, and raise the potential for significant interstate conflict to higher levels than at any time since the end of the Cold War."
    • Published On: 7/1/2016
  •  Outplayed: Regaining Strategic Initiative in the Gray Zone, A Report Sponsored by the Army Capabilities Integration Center in Coordination with Joint Staff J-39/Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment Branch

    Outplayed: Regaining Strategic Initiative in the Gray Zone, A Report Sponsored by the Army Capabilities Integration Center in Coordination with Joint Staff J-39/Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment Branch

    Outplayed: Regaining Strategic Initiative in the Gray Zone, A Report Sponsored by the Army Capabilities Integration Center in Coordination with Joint Staff J-39/Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment Branch LTC Charles R Burnett, COL William J Cain Jr, LTC Christopher D Compton, Mr Nathan P Freier, LTC Sean M Hankard, Prof Robert S Hume, LTC Gary R Kramlich II, COL J Matthew Lissner, LTC Tobin A Magsig, COL Daniel E Mouton, Mr Michael S Muztafago, COL James M Schultze, Prof John F Troxell, LTC Dennis G Wille Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "U.S. competitors pursuing meaningful revision or rejection of the current U.S.-led status quo are employing a host of hybrid methods to advance and secure interests that are in many cases contrary to those of the United States. These challengers employ unique combinations of influence, intimidation, coercion, and aggression to incrementally crowd out effective resistance, establish local or regional advantages, and manipulate risk perceptions in their favor."
    • Published On: 6/1/2016
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