Center for Strategic Leadership

 
  •  The Strategic Importance of Shale Gas

    The Strategic Importance of Shale Gas

    The Strategic Importance of Shale Gas Nathaniel Freeland Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Fuel powers the industrial production that strengthens the economy and provides the means to project national power. Reliable sources of energy are imperative to the security of the United States. Aside from coal, conventional natural gas deposits have been the most practical and easiest to recover. Approximately 24% of the United States energy is supplied by natural gas. Broken down by sector, it is a major fuel source for a wide range of industries to include paper, metals, chemicals and food processing. In addition to its industrial uses, natural gas is used to heat, cool, and cook in the residential and commercial sectors of the United States. Due to its cleaner-burning properties, economic availability, and equivalent power to quantity ratio, it has become a favored alternative. In terms of energy output natural gas provides one and one-third times as much energy as gasoline, which is very important in considering alternative fuel sources. However, natural gas supply has been overtaken by the demand of the U.S. economy. "
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  BRIC in the Backyard: Brazil's Economic Rise and What it Means for the United States

    BRIC in the Backyard: Brazil's Economic Rise and What it Means for the United States

    BRIC in the Backyard: Brazil's Economic Rise and What it Means for the United States COL James K Rose Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "In today’s increasing globalized world there are several rapidly emerging market success stories that many economic and financial analysts are watching with great anticipation. Brazil is one of these of these geo-political risers and it is perhaps the most underestimated of the so-called BRIC countries. The term BRIC was coined by Jim O’Neill from the Wall Street giant Goldman-Sachs in 2003 and refers to the up and coming economic powerhouse nations around the globe and includes Brazil, Russia, India and China. The story behind Brazil’s economic growth is a remarkable tale and has multiple strategic implications for the United States as the two countries struggle to define their future bilateral relationship. The question of what Brazil’s rise means for the United States and what are the security implications for the hemisphere are significant."
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  Is Brazil Actually Ready to be a World Economic Power?

    Is Brazil Actually Ready to be a World Economic Power?

    Is Brazil Actually Ready to be a World Economic Power? COL Vance F Stewart III Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Brazil, a large and populous country, is blessed with an abundance of natural resources and long-standing ties and traditions to Europe; it is seen as a leader among the nations of the South American continent. Brazil’s ascendancy into the world’s diplomatic and economic leadership circles has been fueled by an amazing ten-year span of economic growth, backed by sound government budgeting and responsible social programs to improve its citizens’ quality of life. It is worth examining though, to ensure that this success has laid a foundation for continued, sustained growth or will it represent a brief moment of glory; with Brazil destined to lapse back into the mediocrity of a developing nation, saddled by crushing poverty, unequal income distribution, crime, and corruption? The question remains, is Brazil actually ready to be a world economic leader? In order to answer the question, this paper will review Brazil’s growth over the past ten years, examine relevant economic indicators, and analyze problem areas that may inhibit or derail future, sustainable progress."
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  Economics of National Security: "Unfunding" Terror

    Economics of National Security: "Unfunding" Terror

    Economics of National Security: "Unfunding" Terror LTC Mark W Holzer Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The discussion of how best to deprive terrorist organizations of funding is necessarily broad because of the numerous means people have devised to acquire and move funds for whatever purpose they intend. How seriously the United States takes this issue can be seen just in the number of statutory provisions that have been adopted and the diligence with which we update terror-associated lists that are aimed at depriving terrorists of funds. While it is clearly a matter of concern, the National Security Strategy’s treatment of this topic is very broad and is discussed only within fairly limited contexts. The muted language of the National Security Strategy (NSS) may simply be a realistic assessment of the difficulties we face in trying to dry up terrorist funding streams and the challenges of evaluating our efforts in spite of the fairly broad approach that has been undertaken in the past decade."
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  Chinese Five Year Plans: An Economic Catalyst?

    Chinese Five Year Plans: An Economic Catalyst?

    Chinese Five Year Plans: An Economic Catalyst? LTC Troy D Galloway Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "China’s embrace of globalization in a measured manner is a direct result of the communist nation’s reliance on five-year national development plans to guide its growth and economic reform. This gradualist approach has worked well in moving the economy towards reform while avoiding significant risk. This short essay will discuss the linkages that exist between the significant Chinese economic success of the last 30 years and the communist five-year plans that have outlined many of the nation’s economic reforms."
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  The Causes and Implications of the 2008 Financial Crisis

    The Causes and Implications of the 2008 Financial Crisis

    The Causes and Implications of the 2008 Financial Crisis COL Robert D Bradford III Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The financial crisis of 2008 shocked markets and led to a global recession. Failure of the financial markets caused economies to shrink resulting in hardship and loss around the world. In our modern connected world, few nations escaped the consequences of the crisis. This huge financial crisis diminished the economic strength of our nation, with significant implications for our national defense. This paper will address competing views of the causes of the crisis, and will discuss some of its potential impacts, including its impact on U.S. national security."
    • Published On: 10/21/2011
  •  Collins Center Update, Volume 13, Issue 4 (Fall 2011)

    Collins Center Update, Volume 13, Issue 4 (Fall 2011)

    Collins Center Update, Volume 13, Issue 4 (Fall 2011) Professor (COL, Ret.) George E. Teague, Professor (COL, Ret.) Alan G. Bourque, Professor (COL, Ret.) Eugene L. Thompson, Professor Bernard F. Griffard, Professor John Patch, Colonel Steven P. Carney, Prof Bert B. Tussing, Mr. Brent Bankus, Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 10/16/2011
  •  Environmental Security in Botswana

    Environmental Security in Botswana

    Environmental Security in Botswana Mr Brent C Bankus Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The continent of Africa is important to U.S. national security interests. Long known for its influence over critical choke points and sea lines of communication, Africa is increasingly known as a land of vast stretches of under-governed spaces, burgeoning terrorist groups, world-class deposits of strategic minerals and petroleum, and the continent most affected by climate change. It is also known for high population growth rates and troubled governments struggling to maintain legitimacy. Many of the challenges to these governments originate with environmental change and a resource base eroded by high population growth rates, bad governmental policy, and environmental degradation. To maintain legitimacy, and preserve political stability, governments must satisfy demands placed on the political system by the population. In Africa, state security increasingly depends upon human security. One country in southern Africa that has succeeded in addressing this paradigm with a whole of government concept is dry and landlocked Botswana."
    • Published On: 10/15/2011
  •  U.S. Pacific Command Pacific Environmental Security Conference

    U.S. Pacific Command Pacific Environmental Security Conference

    U.S. Pacific Command Pacific Environmental Security Conference COL Douglas Charney, COL Philip D Jones, COL Cheryl A Ludwa, Mr Todd M Wheeler Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Environmental issues are widely recognized as contributing factors to instability and conflict. The Center for Strategic Leadership of the US Army War College has been known for its subject matter expertise in the area of environmental security for nearly two decades and in particular has had the opportunity to work with the Geographic Combatant Commands to embed environmental security in their engagement and security cooperation programs."
    • Published On: 10/10/2011
  •  Assessing the Strategic Environment: Developing Critical Thinking Skills at the Ethiopian Defense Command and Staff College

    Assessing the Strategic Environment: Developing Critical Thinking Skills at the Ethiopian Defense Command and Staff College

    Assessing the Strategic Environment: Developing Critical Thinking Skills at the Ethiopian Defense Command and Staff College Prof Bernard F Griffard Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "A government’s failure to understand the impact of global variables on the domestic environment can result in major destabilizing events. Emperor Tewodros II of Abyssinia (Ethiopia) learned this lesson the hard way. In 1862, after a snub by the British Government, the Emperor took the British Consul and other Europeans hostage to pressure the Crown to meet his request for equipment and training support. Being a somewhat impatient ruler, he also detained the British delegation sent to negotiate the initial hostages’ release. Because Britain’s ruling Liberal Party was reluctant to engage in “imperial adventures,” the hostages were still in loco Abyssinia into 1867."
    • Published On: 7/18/2011
  •  Strategic Minerals: Is China's Consumption a Threat to United States Security?

    Strategic Minerals: Is China's Consumption a Threat to United States Security?

    Strategic Minerals: Is China's Consumption a Threat to United States Security? Mr Brent C Bankus, Dr Kent H Butts, LT Adam Norris Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The vitality of a powerful nation depends upon its ability to secure access to the strategic resources necessary to sustain its economy and produce effective weapons for defense. This is especially true for the world’s two largest economies, those of the United States and China, which are similarly import dependent for around half of their petroleum imports and large quantities of their strategic minerals. Because China’s economy and resource import dependence continue to grow at a high rate it has adopted a geopolitical strategy to secure strategic resources. China’s resulting role in the mineral trade has increased Western security community concern over strategic minerals to its highest point since the end of the Cold War. "
    • Published On: 7/18/2011
  •  Collins Center Update Volume 13 Issue 3

    Collins Center Update Volume 13 Issue 3

    Collins Center Update Volume 13 Issue 3 Professor Bernard F. Griffard, Colonel Sam White, Jr, LTC Vince Lindenmeyer, Professor Dennis Murphy, Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 7/18/2011
  •  Examining Military Governance as a Part of Professional Military Education

    Examining Military Governance as a Part of Professional Military Education

    Examining Military Governance as a Part of Professional Military Education Mr Brent C Bankus, Ms Lorelei E W Coplen, Prof James O Kievit Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "After the capture of Baghdad in 2003, the expectation was that an Iraqi entity would quickly step forward to begin to fill the role of government in the territory formerly ruled by Saddam Hussein. Instead, there was a power vacuum which the United States – and in particular the United States military – had to fill. Similarly, in Afghanistan, despite the relatively quick identification of Hamid Karzai as the “designated” national leader, it also became clear that the new national government lacked many of the essential capabilities required to actually implement good governance. Again, despite the clear preference of many of today’s military officers to have some other entity (whether of the U.S. government, the United Nations, or even non-government private contractors) be responsible for doing so, that responsibility initially fell largely, if not exclusively, on U.S. military commanders. Even though the U.S. military, especially the U.S. Army, has had a long history of military governance activities, many of those commanders felt unprepared and/or that it was 'not really my job.'"
    • Published On: 6/15/2011
  •  Developing a Diplomatic Corps that is Second-to-None

    Developing a Diplomatic Corps that is Second-to-None

    Developing a Diplomatic Corps that is Second-to-None Mr Samuel R White Jr Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The 2010 National Security Strategy (NSS) marked a change in emphasis in United States foreign policy direction after more than a decade of continuous military engagement in Afghanistan and Iraq. Global operations against violent extremist groups and entrenched and pervasive terror networks moved policy emphasis toward traditional” hard power” levers – primarily military and economic coercion. Though these elements have dominated U.S. efforts since 9/11, the current NSS implements foreign policy across a wider range of engagement options, balanced between appropriate measures of hard and soft power – coined “smart power” by Joseph Nye."
    • Published On: 6/7/2011
  •  In the Dark; Military Planning for a Catastrophic Critical Infrastructure Event

    In the Dark; Military Planning for a Catastrophic Critical Infrastructure Event

    In the Dark; Military Planning for a Catastrophic Critical Infrastructure Event Mr Kevin J Cogan Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The earth is situated in a strategic location just 93 million miles from its sun. Since its creation it has survived the cataclysms of temperature extremes, meteor bombardments, and solar storm events. It has survived these events so well that life, including humans, has flourished and prospered in increasing numbers and progressively higher standards of living. For all but the last 150 years, the infrastructure constructed for better human living standards has been relatively unaffected by localized geological disasters or the broader effects of solar storms. But the harnessing of electrical power, begun in the mid-nineteenth century and its distribution via an interconnected grid to which 86% of the U.S. population is now connected, has created the potential for a near certain catastrophe of unprecedented proportion if it fails..."
    • Published On: 5/18/2011
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