Middle East & North Africa

 
  •  Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 1

    Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 1

    Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 1 Colonel Joel D. Rayburn, Colonel Frank K. Sobchak with Lieutenant Colonel Jeanne F. Godfroy, Colonel Matthew D. Morton, Colonel James S. Powell, Lieutenant Colonel Matthew M. Zai Document by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The U.S. Army in the Iraq War was commissioned by Chief of Staff of the Army General Raymond Odierno in 2013 to serve as the initial Army’s operational level history of the conflict. While he instructed that the review should be held to the same academic and evidentiary requirements of previous historical studies, other aspects would be fundamentally different. Believing that a classified review of the war would not be circulated sufficiently to engender organizational learning and change, General Odierno directed that the final product should be a readable, unclassified narrative."
    • Published On: 1/17/2019
  •  Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 2

    Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 2

    Executive Summary: The U.S. Army in the Iraq War, Vol. 2 Colonel Joel D. Rayburn, Colonel Frank K. Sobchak, with Lieutenant Colonel Jeanne F. Godfroy, Colonel Matthew D. Morton, Colonel James S. Powell, Lieutenant Colonel Matthew M. Zais Document by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The U.S. Army in the Iraq War was commissioned by Chief of Staff of the Army General Raymond Odierno in 2013 to serve as the initial Army’s operational level history of the conflict. While he instructed that the review should be held to the same academic and evidentiary requirements of previous historical studies, other aspects would be fundamentally different. Believing that a classified review of the war would not be circulated sufficiently to engender organizational learning and change, General Odierno directed that the final product should be a readable, unclassified narrative."
    • Published On: 1/17/2019
  •  Peace & Stability Journal, Special 25th Anniversary Edition

    Peace & Stability Journal, Special 25th Anniversary Edition

    Peace & Stability Journal, Special 25th Anniversary Edition Peace and Stability Journal by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute
    • Published On: 11/27/2018
  •  Maneuvering the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry in the Middle East: How the United States Can Preserve and Protect Its Long-Term Interests in the Region

    Maneuvering the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry in the Middle East: How the United States Can Preserve and Protect Its Long-Term Interests in the Region

    Maneuvering the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry in the Middle East: How the United States Can Preserve and Protect Its Long-Term Interests in the Region Mr Gregory Aftandilian Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This monograph examines how the United States should preserve and protect its long-term interests in the Middle East region by maneuvering carefully and strategically in the Saudi-Iranian conflict. The monograph first analyzes the history of the conflict between these two countries and shows that, while these two regional powers were rivals, they were not necessarily enemies and cooperated at times. It then traces their recent conflict back to the Iranian revolution and brings it up-to-date with their support for opposing sides in proxy wars in the region, taking part in sectarian diatribes, and the breaking of diplomatic relations."
    • Published On: 11/15/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: Better Late Than Never

    Strategic Insights: Better Late Than Never

    Strategic Insights: Better Late Than Never Dr M. Chris Mason Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 10/23/2018
  •  Assessing the Collective Security Treaty Organization: Capabilities and Vulnerabilities

    Assessing the Collective Security Treaty Organization: Capabilities and Vulnerabilities

    Assessing the Collective Security Treaty Organization: Capabilities and Vulnerabilities Dr Richard Weitz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) consists of Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, and Tajikistan. The CSTO’s membership has been stable, with the exception that Uzbekistan, which joined the organization in 2006, withdrew in 2012. The CSTO operates on the basis of the Collective Security Treaty (CST), a mutual defense pact signed in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, on May 15, 1992. The CSTO’s initial declared purpose was to counter external aggression against members and to harmonize their foreign policy stances."
    • Published On: 10/18/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End?

    Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End?

    Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End? Azeem Ibrahim Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Prior to 1912, Libya was a province within the Ottoman Empire and subdivided into two regions (Tripolitania in the west and Cyrenaica in the east) reflecting a long-standing ethnic and geographic division in the country. Although not administered separately, the large region reaching south into the Sahara had a different ethnic make-up compared to the rest of the country and was more connected to sub-Saharan Africa than to the Mediterranean. Ottoman control in the south was limited to a few towns, which gave them some oversight of the trade routes; but by the start of the 20th century, Ottoman authority was notional rather than effective in this region."
    • Published On: 9/26/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End?

    Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End?

    Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End? Dr Azeem Ibrahim Article by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Prior to 1912, Libya was a province within the Ottoman Empire and subdivided into two regions (Tripolitania in the west and Cyrenaica in the east) reflecting a long-standing ethnic and geographic division in the country. Although not administered separately, the large region reaching south into the Sahara had a different ethnic make-up compared to the rest of the country and was more connected to sub-Saharan Africa than to the Mediterranean. Ottoman control in the south was limited to a few towns, which gave them some oversight of the trade routes; but by the start of the 20th century, Ottoman authority was notional rather than effective in this region."
    • Published On: 9/26/2018
  •  A Security Role for the United States in a Post-ISIS Syria?

    A Security Role for the United States in a Post-ISIS Syria?

    A Security Role for the United States in a Post-ISIS Syria? Mr Gregory Aftandilian Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "SYRIA has become one of the most vexing and complex problems for U.S. strategic planners in recent times. Currently, the United States has about 2,000 troops in the northeastern part of the country whose primary mission has been to aid the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), made up primarily of Kurds and some Arab tribesmen, to fight ISIS..."
    • Published On: 9/14/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: The Assad Regime and Chemical Weapons

    Strategic Insights: The Assad Regime and Chemical Weapons

    Strategic Insights: The Assad Regime and Chemical Weapons Dr Robert J Bunker Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 5/18/2018
  •  Strategic Insights: After the Smoke Clears in Syria: Dilemmas for U.S. Strategy Remain

    Strategic Insights: After the Smoke Clears in Syria: Dilemmas for U.S. Strategy Remain

    Strategic Insights: After the Smoke Clears in Syria: Dilemmas for U.S. Strategy Remain Dr Christopher J Bolan Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 5/18/2018
  •  PKSOI SOLLIMS Samplers	SOLLIMS Sampler - Volume 8, Issue 2

    PKSOI SOLLIMS Samplers SOLLIMS Sampler - Volume 8, Issue 2

    PKSOI SOLLIMS Samplers SOLLIMS Sampler - Volume 8, Issue 2 PKSOI SOLLIMS Sampler by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "This lessons-learned compendium contains just a sample – thus the title ‘Sampler’ – of the observations, insights, and lessons related to Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) available in the SOLLIMS data repository. These lessons are worth sharing with military commanders and their staffs, as well as with civilian practitioners having a peacekeeping or stability operations related mission or function, such as those currently deployed on stability operations, those planning to deploy, the institutional Army, the Joint community, policymakers, and other international civilian and military leaders at the national and theater level."
    • Published On: 1/25/2018
  •  21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field Dr Anna Simons Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Among lessons said to have been learned over the past decade and a half is that the United States should never again use force absent a coherent strategy. Yet, no matter how necessary a coherent strategy is, it will prove insufficient unless the problem of too many competing hierarchies is likewise addressed. A second complicating challenge for those in 21st-century command is churn: churn of personnel, of units, and of responsibility. Without there being a commanding general, a supreme commander, or some “one” individual placed in charge for the duration, decisive results will remain elusive."
    • Published On: 5/31/2017
  •  Can Egypt Lead the Arab World Again? Assessing Opportunities and Challenges for U.S. Policy

    Can Egypt Lead the Arab World Again? Assessing Opportunities and Challenges for U.S. Policy

    Can Egypt Lead the Arab World Again? Assessing Opportunities and Challenges for U.S. Policy Mr Gregory Aftandilian Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This monograph’s research, completed in August 2016, analyzes the potential for Egypt to resume an Arab leadership role that has been in abeyance for several years because of its turbulent domestic scene. The monograph also assesses whether or not such a role would be beneficial for U.S. policy. Although there has been a change in U.S. leadership since then, the situation in Egypt has remained the same."
    • Published On: 5/26/2017
  •  The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy

    The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy

    The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy Mr Keir Giles Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This Letort Paper examines the background to Russia’s use of military force in Ukraine in 2014 and Syria in 2015, and investigates the roots of Russia’s new assertiveness and willingness to resort to direct military action to resolve foreign policy challenges. This Letort Paper identifies two long-standing trends that led to this increased willingness: first, a greater and more urgent perception of threat, whether real or imagined, to Russia’s own security; and second, a recognition that Russia itself had regained sufficient strength, military and otherwise, to assert itself and counter this threat."
    • Published On: 5/25/2017
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