Recent Articles

 
  •  The Fog of Peace: Finding the End-State of Hostilities

    The Fog of Peace: Finding the End-State of Hostilities

    The Fog of Peace: Finding the End-State of Hostilities Mr Manfred K Rotermund Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Modern hostilities feature military action as an adjunct to diplomacy or as an active tool of diplomacy. The task of achieving peace after such hostilities is perhaps more difficult than it was in the past. Diplomatic considerations often place many players at both the war and peace tables, or at least in the room. Then there is the very question of what the constituents of peace may be. Experience teaches us that the end of hostilities is not peace. At the end of this monograph, I suggest that the peace achieved in Europe after World War II still has many fragile elements to it. My contention is that peace can come only after the salience of pre-hostility ideologies, desires, and tendencies has been minimized. This applies to both conventional wars and military operations other than war that bring intervention from the United States, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), United Nations (U.N.), or other groups."
    • Published On: 11/1/1999
  •  Land Power and Dual Containment: Rethinking America's Policy in the Gulf

    Land Power and Dual Containment: Rethinking America's Policy in the Gulf

    Land Power and Dual Containment: Rethinking America's Policy in the Gulf Dr Stephen C Pelletiere Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author of this study contends that America’s Dual Containment policy has failed. He outlines in what way he thinks that it has, and suggests alternative polices, which he believes might prove successful, and which would not destablize the Gulf—the risk that (in the author’s view) we are now running."
    • Published On: 11/1/1999
  •  Security and Civil-Military Relations in the New World Disorder: The Use of Armed Forces in the Americas

    Security and Civil-Military Relations in the New World Disorder: The Use of Armed Forces in the Americas

    Security and Civil-Military Relations in the New World Disorder: The Use of Armed Forces in the Americas Dr Max G Manwaring Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In December 1998, the U.S. Army War College joined with the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army and the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University to cosponsor a conference entitled “The Use of Land Forces in the Americas.” It was held on December 15, 1998, at the Bush School and was hosted by the President of Texas A&M University—Kingsville, Lieutenant General Marc Cisneros, USA (Retired)."
    • Published On: 9/1/1999
  •  The Growing Imperative to Adopt "Flexibility" as an American Principle of War

    The Growing Imperative to Adopt "Flexibility" as an American Principle of War

    The Growing Imperative to Adopt "Flexibility" as an American Principle of War LTC Robert S Frost Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "While clearly a mark of service parochialism, Army officers are usually surprised when an Air Force Officer brings forward something in the realm of the theory of war that addresses anything other than strategic bombing or air superiority. Yet here is a truly thoughtful monograph that does just that. The author wrote this when a student at the U.S. Army War College in academic year 1998-99."
    • Published On: 9/1/1999
  •  America's Army in Transition: Preparing for War in the Precision Age

    America's Army in Transition: Preparing for War in the Precision Age

    America's Army in Transition: Preparing for War in the Precision Age Maj Gen Robert H Scales Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This Issue Paper has been developed to provide some insights into the possible course of future limited wars and to suggest how we should fight them. The ColdWar is over. Thankfully it will be some time before we will have to face the prospect of fighting a major military competitor who can threaten our vital national interests. But recent events such as Kosovo seem to be telling us that lesser conflicts fought for less than vital interests will continue to challenge us. We must develop an understanding of these conflicts. We must also develop a realistic doctrine for winning them based on our own practical experience."
    • Published On: 9/1/1999
  •  China's Strategic Modernization: Implications for the United States

    China's Strategic Modernization: Implications for the United States

    China's Strategic Modernization: Implications for the United States Major Mark A Stokes Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Over the course of the last decade, the Chinese defense-industrial complex has initiated a focused strategic modernization program to meet the requirements of 21st century warfare. Chinese leaders, faced with numerous perceived national security challenges, have called for a readjustment of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) doctrine requiring the modernization of its space, information, long-range precision strike, and other strategic dimensions of warfare."
    • Published On: 9/1/1999
  •  The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 2: August, 1999

    The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 2: August, 1999

    The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 2: August, 1999 Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 8/15/1999
  •  Mediterranean Security into the Coming Millennium

    Mediterranean Security into the Coming Millennium

    Mediterranean Security into the Coming Millennium Dr Stephen J Blank Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "As Kosovo demonstrates, the United States is and will continue to be deeply engaged in the security of the Mediterranean Basin. Moreover, we will participate in shaping benevolent outcomes there with our allies and partners. Indeed, the United States cannot do otherwise since the multiple challenges to regional security in that area are so diverse and numerous. For these reasons, we must engage our allies and partners in an ongoing dialogue over the nature of security challenges, their perceptions of them, and the most effective ways to address them."
    • Published On: 8/1/1999
  •  Caspian Sea Environmental Security Game

    Caspian Sea Environmental Security Game

    Caspian Sea Environmental Security Game Arthur L Bradshaw, Dr Kent H Butts Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Caspian Sea and International Environmental Security Game was the second annual international environmental security exercise conducted by the Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) of the U. S. Army War College. Held at the CSL’s Collins Center, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, on 16-17 November 1998, this year’s exercise focused on the energy resources, geopolitics, and environmental security of the Caspian Basin."
    • Published On: 7/1/1999
  •  Population Diversity and the U.S. Army

    Population Diversity and the U.S. Army

    Population Diversity and the U.S. Army COL Lloyd J Matthews, Dr Tinaz Pavri Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "At times, an institution needs to examine itself and take stock of its future. The “Army” writ large as an institution is, above all, an assembly of people—all with a common bond and task. This book deals with the vital question of how the United States armed forces in general, and the Army as an institution in particular, can best accommodate in their recruiting efforts the rapid changes in U.S. population patterns over the next half century."
    • Published On: 6/1/1999
  •  Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc?

    Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc?

    Transnational Threats from the Middle East: Crying Wolf or Crying Havoc? Prof Anthony H Cordesman Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "There is no doubt that the Middle East can present significant potential threats to the West. The author of this monograph examines these threats in order to put them into perspective—to distinguish between “crying wolf” and “crying havoc.” After thorough analysis, he contends that the problems caused by narcotics and organized crime, immigration, terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction do not as yet require draconian action by the Western nations. However, he asserts that if the threats of Middle Eastern terrorism and proliferation were to be combined into super-terrorism, the result would create a new form of asymmetric warfare for which the West is singularly ill-prepared."
    • Published On: 5/31/1999
  •  Future Warfare

    Future Warfare

    Future Warfare Maj Gen Robert H Scales Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "We stand at the brink of a new century as well as a new millennium. The pace of technological change is steadily accelerating, while the strategic environment remains opaque and uncertain. Once again the United States is between major wars. Yet, the current period is not the first time the American military have confronted an inter-war period. Between 1919 and 1941 the services developed a wide range of capabilities from carrier aviation and amphibious warfare to combined arms tactics that stood the country well in the terrible conflict that followed the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Similarly, in the inter-war periods between 1953 and 1965, and 1973 and 1991, the American military confronted a wide disparity of challenges. Again, the development of airmobile and then air-land battle underlined the importance of peacetime innovation to battlefield performance."
    • Published On: 5/1/1999
  •  The Future U.S. Military Presence in Asia: Landpower and the Geostrategy of American Commitment

    The Future U.S. Military Presence in Asia: Landpower and the Geostrategy of American Commitment

    The Future U.S. Military Presence in Asia: Landpower and the Geostrategy of American Commitment Maj Gen Robert H Scales, Dr Larry M Wortzel Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For more than 50 years, countries around the world have looked to the United States for international leadership. Most Asian governments welcome a U.S. presence in the region to help preserve security and stability. They know that an American presence does not mean an occupying force since, if asked, the United States leaves. These countries are reassured by a more or less continuous presence of U.S. forces in a way that the temporary passage or intervention of expeditionary forces will not accomplish."
    • Published On: 4/1/1999
  •  Pacific Security Today: Overcoming the Hurdles

    Pacific Security Today: Overcoming the Hurdles

    Pacific Security Today: Overcoming the Hurdles Mr Thomas M Molino Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Misperception and miscommunication adversely affect Asia-Pacific security, especially U.S.-Chinese relations. Long distances and cultural differences contribute to misperception and miscommunication between the United States and Asian countries. This problem has become particularly evident during the Asian economic crisis, reflecting both cultural and capital influences."
    • Published On: 3/24/1999
  •  The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 1: March, 1999

    The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 1: March, 1999

    The Collins Center Update Vol 1, Issue 1: March, 1999 Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 3/15/1999
Page 98 of 100