Recent Articles

 
  •  The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective

    The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective

    The Army and Homeland Security: A Strategic Perspective Dr Antulio J Echevarria II Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The topic of homeland security includes a broad array of missions and mission areas ranging from national missile defense to military assistance to civil authorities. Recently the topic has attracted a great deal of attention due to the public’s heightened awareness of the variety and nature of emerging threats and of the United States’ vulnerabilities to them."
    • Published On: 3/1/2001
  •  U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy Dr Joseph R Cerami, COL James F Holcomb Jr Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Advice to strategists comes in many forms. Kennedy and Gaddis’s thoughts expressed above are representative of most scholars, statesmen, and generals—strategy is a critical subject for senior leaders. George Marshall expressed concerns, late in his distinguished career, that as a statesman he had to learn a “whole new set of skills.” Theater strategists, like Field Marshall Slim, have written that senior leaders must learn how to “think big.” Important books on the subject stress an in depth knowledge of history, economics, politics, geography, culture, and so on. For a concept that remains hard to define, the study of strategy remains a complex subject of lifelong learning for scholars, statesmen, and soldiers alike."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Planning for a Peaceful Korea

    Planning for a Peaceful Korea

    Planning for a Peaceful Korea Mr Henry D Sokolski Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "As a new millennium dawns over the Korean peninsula, millenary hopes and expectations are very much in evidence among students of Korean affairs. Half a century after the surprise attack that launched the Korean War, almost 5 decades into the continuing high-tension military standoff that has followed the 1953 Korean War ceasefire, there is suddenly a pervasive and growing anticipation that this tormented and divided nation may now be on the threshold of a new and momentous era: an era of genuine peace, in which the “Cold War structure on the Korean peninsula” is at last dismantled, and a reconciliation between the antagonist governments based in Pyongyang (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or DPRK) and Seoul (the Republic of Korea, or ROK) commences in earnest."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century

    Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century

    Conventional Deterrence in the First Quarter of the New Century Colonel Peter D. Menk Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Over the past half-century deterrence has been the bedrock of United States defense policy. As we move into the first quarter of the 21st century deterrence will remain fundamental to national security, however, a continually evolving multi-polar world may require different methodologies to achieve deterrence. Therefore a new set of dialogues on the nature of deterrence is required."
    • Published On: 2/1/2001
  •  Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop

    Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop

    Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop COL Peter D Menk Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "This Issue Paper summarizes the factual discussions and issues raised during the Center for Strategic Leadership, United States Army War College and the Foreign Service Institute, Department of State hosted Post-Conflict Strategic Requirements Workshop, conducted at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania November 28 to November 30, 2000. Participants included United States Ambassadors and United States military commanders experienced in affected regions, distinguished subject matter experts from the inter-agency arena, NGOs, allied nations, and the United Nations."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts

    Asymmetry and U.S. Military Strategy: Definition, Background, and Strategic Concepts Dr Douglas V Johnson II, Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute: "In war, there are always differences between the opponents. At times these are insignificant, passing disparities with no bearing on the outcome. At other times, the differences between opponents are important, placing one in a position of advantage, the other at a disadvantage. This is a very simple observation, but from it flows one of the pressing issues faced by the United States today: strategic asymmetry."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications

    The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications

    The American Army in the Balkans: Strategic Alternatives and Implications Dr Steven Metz Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since 1995, peace operations in the Balkans have been an important part of the Army’s contribution to U.S. national security. When these operations began, the Army institutionally focused on conventional warfighting. Since then, it has made significant changes to become more effective at peace operations, but this evolution continues. The goals that led the United States into the Balkans have not yet been fully realized. To meet them requires both sustained involvement in the region and continued refinement of the Army’s peace operations capabilities."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  Landpower and Crises: Army Roles and Missions in Smaller-Scale Contingencies During the 1990s

    Landpower and Crises: Army Roles and Missions in Smaller-Scale Contingencies During the 1990s

    Landpower and Crises: Army Roles and Missions in Smaller-Scale Contingencies During the 1990s Dr Conrad C Crane Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this study, Dr. Conrad Crane analyzes the role of landpower in the 170 SSCs conducted during the last decade. He disaggregates such contingencies into engagement, enhanced deterrence, hostility, and stabilization phases, and discusses the military’s role in each one. Though cruise missiles and aircraft have been the primary policy tool for actual hostilities, the Army has been the predominant service in the other phases, especially for stabilization. He points out that no major foreign policy objectives have been achieved from major theater deployments during the last decade without some form of significant longterm Army involvement in the region after the crisis has been resolved."
    • Published On: 1/1/2001
  •  The Collins Center Update Vol 3, Issue 1: October-December, 2000

    The Collins Center Update Vol 3, Issue 1: October-December, 2000

    The Collins Center Update Vol 3, Issue 1: October-December, 2000 Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 12/15/2000
  •  The Russian Armed Forces at the Dawn of the Millennium

    The Russian Armed Forces at the Dawn of the Millennium

    The Russian Armed Forces at the Dawn of the Millennium Michael H Crutcher Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "This anthology is an outgrowth of a conference titled “The Russian Armed Forces at the Dawn of the Millennium,” held at the Collins Center of the Army War College’s Center for Strategic Leadership from 7 through 9 February 2000. The genesis for the conference was the realization by several members of the staff of the Collins Center and Army War College faculty that the U.S.-led NATO operation in Kosovo resulted in a significant shift of Russian views on the United States and NATO. The conference also complemented our general objective of examining the changing environment in which the United States—including its armed forces—finds itself. "
    • Published On: 12/1/2000
  •  Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States

    Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States

    Alternative National Military Strategies for the United States Dr Conrad C Crane Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army War College and the Georgetown University Center for Peace and Security Studies, along with its National Security Studies Program, cosponsored a conference in Washington, DC on September 21, 2000, to examine the issues that will shape future American defense policy. Discussion panels were structured to identify the questions, issues, and schisms likely to shape the upcoming Quadrennial Defense Review. Among the 160 attendees registered for the conference were representatives from the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) offices for all the Services and the Joint Staff, as well as defense experts from other government agencies, private industry, and academia."
    • Published On: 12/1/2000
  •  The Asia-Pacific in the U.S. National Security Calculus for a New Millennium

    The Asia-Pacific in the U.S. National Security Calculus for a New Millennium

    The Asia-Pacific in the U.S. National Security Calculus for a New Millennium Dr Andrew Scobell, Dr Larry M Wortzel Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The Asia-Pacific region has become increasingly central to U.S. national security concerns. The drawdown of U.S. forces that began in the mid-1970s has not translated into a decline in U.S. interest or engagement in the Asia-Pacific. The United States continues to have a significant forward presence, steadfast allies, and thriving trade and investment in countries throughout the region."
    • Published On: 12/1/2000
  •  Organizing for National Security

    Organizing for National Security

    Organizing for National Security Dr Douglas Stuart Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army War College chose the theme of “Organizing for National Security” for its Tenth Annual Strategy Conference in order to contribute to the upcoming debate about institutional reform. This volume provides a summary of the proceedings of that conference. It includes historical, analytical, and prescriptive articles relating to the national security bureaucracy. "
    • Published On: 11/1/2000
  •  Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies

    Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies

    Transnational Threats: Blending Law Enforcement and Military Strategies Dr Carolyn Pumphrey Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "On February 2-3, 2000, the U.S. Army War College, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, and the Duke University Center for Law, Ethics, and National Security co-sponsored a conference in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference examined transnational threats, including terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction, cyber threats to the national infrastructure, and international organized crime. The goal was to evaluate the seriousness of such threats and discuss strategies for dealing with them. In particular, the conference sought to address the question of how military and law enforcement could blend their strategies to better counter transnational threats. A secondary purpose was to clarify the role of the military in meeting challenges that transcend national borders and threaten our national interests."
    • Published On: 11/1/2000
  •  Generations Apart: Xers and Boomers in the Officer Corps

    Generations Apart: Xers and Boomers in the Officer Corps

    Generations Apart: Xers and Boomers in the Officer Corps Dr Leonard Wong Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph addresses the junior officer attrition problem by identifying and discussing the disparity between senior and junior officers in terms of generational differences. Officers from the Baby Boom Generation think and perceive things differently than officers from Generation X. Using empirical evidence to support the generational differences literature, the author points out that Generation X officers are more confident in their abilities, perceive loyalty differently, want more balance between work and family, and are not intimidated by rank. Additionally, while pay is important to Generation X officers, it alone will not keep junior officers from leaving. The solutions presented in the monograph range from strategic policies changing the Army as an organization to operational leadership actions affecting the face-to-face interaction between senior and junior officers."
    • Published On: 10/1/2000
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