Recent Articles

 
  •  Halt Phase Strategy: New Wine in Old Skins . . . with Powerpoint

    Halt Phase Strategy: New Wine in Old Skins . . . with Powerpoint

    Halt Phase Strategy: New Wine in Old Skins . . . with Powerpoint Dr Earl H Tilford Jr Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Earl H. Tilford, Jr., analyzes the Halt Phase Strategy/Doctrine currently advocated by the Air Force. As a part of his analysis, the author traces the immediate origins of the “Halt” strategy to the aftermath of the 1997 Report of the Quadrennial Defense Review. Dr. Tilford contends, however, that Halt’s real origins are more closely identified with intrinsic Air Force strategic bombing doctrine, and are to be found in strategies associated with atomic and nuclear deterrence and warfighting. Thus, he concludes that Halt is really “new wine in old skins” being presented today more aggressively because of rapid technological advances."
    • Published On: 7/1/1998
  •  The Political-Military Rivalry for Operational Control in U.S. Military Actions: A Soldier's Perspective

    The Political-Military Rivalry for Operational Control in U.S. Military Actions: A Soldier's Perspective

    The Political-Military Rivalry for Operational Control in U.S. Military Actions: A Soldier's Perspective COL Lloyd J Matthews Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The following monograph by retired Colonel Lloyd J. Matthews, U.S. Army, presents a soldier’s perspective of the operational implications of instant access to the battlefield by civilian leaders in Washington. It also suggests steps that might be taken to assure constructive collaboration between military and civil authorities, leaving each group to make its own essential contribution to success in the nation’s military undertakings around the world."
    • Published On: 6/22/1998
  •  Nonlethality and American Land Power: Strategic Context and Operational Concepts

    Nonlethality and American Land Power: Strategic Context and Operational Concepts

    Nonlethality and American Land Power: Strategic Context and Operational Concepts Prof Douglas C Lovelace Jr, Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Within the U.S. Army, this is a time of both excitement and challenge. As immense change takes place in the global security environment, American land power must be adapted to assure it can continue to protect and promote national interests into the 21st century. This requires the development and integration of a range of new technologies, concepts, and organizations. Among these, nonlethality—using armed force in a way that minimizes casualties—shows promise for specialized applications."
    • Published On: 6/15/1998
  •  On Diversity

    On Diversity

    On Diversity LTC Andre H Sayles Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Colonel Sayles’ thesis, “the same, but different,” gives us honest and heartfelt insights into the feelings of soldiers from a minority perspective. Part of the challenge of leading a culturally, racially and ethnically diverse Army is to forge a cohesive, fully integrated military organization while keeping sight of the basic human desire to spend some time with folks who “are the same.” Colonel Sayles’ essay is imbued in the basic values of our country and our Army, which is why it delivers such a powerful message. By developing the Army’s Consideration of Others Program, he has also touched on not only physical, but social and gender related differences in people."
    • Published On: 6/1/1998
  •  The Case for Army XXI

    The Case for Army XXI

    The Case for Army XXI Mr John Gordon IV, Mr Peter A Wilson Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The authors contend that today’s Army is essentially a “barbell” shaped organization: very light or very heavy forces with little in the form of “middleweight” units. One of the fundamental decisions that the Army must make in the coming decade is whether it intends to continue this organizational structure or modify it modestly or radically. If major modification is appropriate, what are the options? Fortunately, the Army has several years to consider such issues."
    • Published On: 5/27/1998
  •  The Creeping Irrelevance of U.S. Force Planning

    The Creeping Irrelevance of U.S. Force Planning

    The Creeping Irrelevance of U.S. Force Planning Dr Jeffrey Record Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Jeffrey Record examines what he believes is a half-century-old and continuing recession of large-interstate warfare and, since the World War’s demise, the unexpected and often violent disintegration of established states. He then addresses the Department of Defense’s persistent planning focus on multiple conventional war scenarios, concluding that this focus on the familiar and comfortable is becoming increasingly irrelevant to a world of small wars and MOOTW. The author’s critical analysis leads him to propose significant and controversial changes in planning standards, force structure, and defense spending. His thought-provoking analyses, conclusions, and recommendations should fuel further discussion of how America’s military can best tackle the strategic uncertainties of the post-Cold War world."
    • Published On: 5/19/1998
  •  Reforming NATO's Military Structures: The Long-Term Study and Its Implications for Land Forces

    Reforming NATO's Military Structures: The Long-Term Study and Its Implications for Land Forces

    Reforming NATO's Military Structures: The Long-Term Study and Its Implications for Land Forces Dr Thomas-Durell Young Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The contemporary debate over the expansion of NATO to include Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary has largely overshadowed an important effort on the part of the Alliance to achieve “internal adaptation” through the work of the Long-Term Study. Part of this process has been a tortuous attempt to reform and reorganize the Alliance’s integrated command structure. Often taken for granted, this structure provides the basis for NATO’s collective defense, and increasingly, as seen in Bosnia, its ability to undertake peace support operations. However, the very value by which nations hold the structure has resulted in a difficult and time-consuming reorganization process which has produced only limited reforms."
    • Published On: 5/15/1998
  •  Redefining Land Power for the 21st Century

    Redefining Land Power for the 21st Century

    Redefining Land Power for the 21st Century Dr William T Johnsen Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Whether the United States is entering an era marked by a “revolution in military affairs” or continues in the strategic interregnum of “the post-Cold War,” a new theory of war will have to be developed to fit “the limiting conditions” and “peculiar preconceptions” that are emerging. To develop this new theory will first require defining land power and understanding its context within military power in the 21st century. That a definition of land power might be needed at this point in the evolution of warfare may seem odd. Readers outside the military, for example, may be surprised to learn that such a definition does not exist.2 To many military practitioners, especially soldiers, the concept of land power is so ingrained that it is largely transparent. It has existed since our first ancestors used their fists, rocks, and sticks to defend themselves from attacks by predatory neighbors."
    • Published On: 5/7/1998
  •  Regional Asia-Pacific Defense Environmental Workshop

    Regional Asia-Pacific Defense Environmental Workshop

    Regional Asia-Pacific Defense Environmental Workshop Dr Kent H Butts, Ms Catherine A J Phinney Studies Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Environmental Security Trilateral Partners of the Australian, Canadian, and United States Departments of Defence hosted a regional Asia-Pacific Defence Environmental Workshop in Darwin, Australia, from 11 to 14 May 1998. The theme of this workshop was “Defence Dimensions of Contemporary Environmental Issues” and was a follow-up to the September 1996 “Asia-Pacific Defence Environmental Conference” held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum where defence and environmental officials from Asia-Pacific Nations could examine the importance of defence related environmental issues to regional stability. Participants of the Hawaii Conference requested future regional workshops, suggested topics and asked to participate in panels and presentations. This workshop was structured in response to those requests. "
    • Published On: 5/1/1998
  •  Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Sahel: The Tuareg Insurgency in Mali

    Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Sahel: The Tuareg Insurgency in Mali

    Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Sahel: The Tuareg Insurgency in Mali LTC Kalifa Keita Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Extreme ethnic violence has been a sordid feature of the post-Cold War world. The discontent underlying the violence sometimes flares into insurgency, threatening the cohesion of the state. Typically, primordial hatreds embedded in ethnic history erode a society’s commitment to democracy and human rights. However, recent history offers examples of some states which resolved severe ethnic conflict without a bloodbath and without a halt to ongoing processes of political reform. The West African nation of Mali is one such state."
    • Published On: 5/1/1998
  •  European Security and NATO Enlargement: A View from Central Europe

    European Security and NATO Enlargement: A View from Central Europe

    European Security and NATO Enlargement: A View from Central Europe Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "NATO’s enlargement represents a watershed event in European security. It closes the so-called “post-Cold War” epoch that began with the fall of the Soviet empire and opens the way to a new stage in European and American history. The tendencies that are now pushing Europe towards greater integration have received a new injection of energy. NATO has not only proven itself the only truly effective security provider among European institutions, it has also shown itself to be the moving force behind Europe’s other security agencies, particularly the European Union (EU)..."
    • Published On: 4/1/1998
  •  The Role of the Armed Forces in the Americas: Civil-Military Relations for the 21st Century

    The Role of the Armed Forces in the Americas: Civil-Military Relations for the 21st Century

    The Role of the Armed Forces in the Americas: Civil-Military Relations for the 21st Century Dr Donald E Schulz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In November 1997, the United States Army War College joined with the U.S. Southern Command, the Inter-American Defense Board, the National Guard Bureau, and the Latin American Consortium of the University of New Mexico and New Mexico State University to cosponsor a conference entitled “The Role of the Armed Forces in the Americas: Civil-Military Relations for the 21st Century.” The meeting was held from 3 to 6 November in Santa Fé, New Mexico, and was hosted by the New Mexico National Guard."
    • Published On: 4/1/1998
  •  New Century, Old Thinking: The Dangers of the Perceptual Gap in U.S.-China Relations

    New Century, Old Thinking: The Dangers of the Perceptual Gap in U.S.-China Relations

    New Century, Old Thinking: The Dangers of the Perceptual Gap in U.S.-China Relations COL Susan M Puska Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "American angst over “China” and how to deal with it has spurred a seemingly endless cycle of U.S. policy debates. Each disagreement or new revelation, such as the recent allegation that the Chinese tried to buy influence through illegal funding to U.S. elections,1 feeds another round of charges that U.S. leaders are either too “soft” or too “hard” on China. These charges are usually punctuated by warnings that these actions could lead to dire consequences for the United States in the future."
    • Published On: 4/1/1998
  •  AY 97 Compendium Army After Next Project

    AY 97 Compendium Army After Next Project

    AY 97 Compendium Army After Next Project Dr Douglas V Johnson II, Yves J. Fontaine, Paul T. Hengst, Barbara A. Jezior, William T. Lasher, Gary J. Motsek, Arthur J. Sosa, Billy E. Wells, Jr Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "These student papers are largely focused on present problems which must be solved before movement toward the future can make much progress. If they are not dramatically futuristic in approach, they are nevertheless set against a future backdrop which is still in the process of being defined. The broader Army After Next program, led by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, is an experiment, an examination of what could be. The Army War College seeks to play its part through this contribution and by educating those officers who will field, staff, and command our future Army."
    • Published On: 4/1/1998
  •  Russia's Armed Forces on the Brink of Reform

    Russia's Armed Forces on the Brink of Reform

    Russia's Armed Forces on the Brink of Reform Dr Stephen J Blank Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The Russian armed forces, by all accounts, are fast approaching a point of no return. The crisis in the armed forces is directly traceable to the policies of the Yeltsin government which have alternated among politicization, fragmentation of those forces into multiple, contending militaries, and the creation of a quasi-authoritarian political process where military policy is decided by irregular institutions that account to and answer to nobody other than President Yeltsin. Similar problems plague the defense economy which is probably still too large and at the same time misdirected, while being unable to support the forces presently under arms. In any case, nobody knows how many men are under arms or the cost of maintaining them, or where defense allocations go."
    • Published On: 3/16/1998
Page 100 of 100