Monographs

 
  •  Delegitimizing Al-Qaeda: A Jihad-Realist Approach

    Delegitimizing Al-Qaeda: A Jihad-Realist Approach

    Delegitimizing Al-Qaeda: A Jihad-Realist Approach Dr Paul Kamolnick Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "During the past 2 decades, America and the world have witnessed the ignoble rise and now-pending destruction of the al-Qaeda terrorist entity, one of the modern world’s most vicious and successful transnational organizations. Scholars and national security personnel have dedicated vast resources to dissecting and analyzing al-Qaeda’s ideological, strategic, organizational, and tactical strengths and weaknesses. Notable in this entire debate, however, has been the repeated refrain among scholars and U.S. policymakers that we have yet to design and execute a successful messaging campaign that effectively attacks and delegitimizes al-Qaeda in the eyes of potential recruits. Dr. Paul Kamolnick’s monograph is designed to address that present lacuna..."
    • Published On: 3/1/2012
  •  Categorical Confusion? The Strategic Implications of Recognizing Challenges Either as Irregular or Traditional

    Categorical Confusion? The Strategic Implications of Recognizing Challenges Either as Irregular or Traditional

    Categorical Confusion? The Strategic Implications of Recognizing Challenges Either as Irregular or Traditional Dr Colin S Gray Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Strategic concepts and the theories they encourage and enable are discretionary intellectual constructions. Strategic concepts are not dictated to us; rather, we choose them and decide how they can serve as building blocks for the edifice of theory we prefer. When strategic theory is confusing, misleading, and not fit for its practical purposes of education and even advice, then it is akin to bad medicine that we take in the mistaken belief that it will do us good. Unfortunately, it is necessary to alert Americans to the inadvertent self-harm they are causing themselves by the poor ways in which they choose to conceptualize strategic behavior."
    • Published On: 2/1/2012
  •  Once Again, the Challenge to the U.S. Army During a Defense Reduction: To Remain a Military Profession

    Once Again, the Challenge to the U.S. Army During a Defense Reduction: To Remain a Military Profession

    Once Again, the Challenge to the U.S. Army During a Defense Reduction: To Remain a Military Profession Dr Don M Snider Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The U.S. Army has been through three reductions-in-force since the inception of the All-Volunteer Force. The first one, roughly 1972-78, actually birthed the All-Volunteer Force. The second one occurred in the late 1990s after the end of the Cold War when the U.S. Army was reduced by approximately one-third in both force structure and budget (Total Obligational Authority). The third one is just now beginning in 2011-12 as the Army returns from a decade of war in the Middle East..."
    • Published On: 2/1/2012
  •  Organizational Change in the Russian Airborne Forces: The Lessons of the Georgian Conflict

    Organizational Change in the Russian Airborne Forces: The Lessons of the Georgian Conflict

    Organizational Change in the Russian Airborne Forces: The Lessons of the Georgian Conflict Dr Rod Thornton Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph considers the recent history of organizational change in the Russian airborne forces (VDV). In particular, it looks at how the VDV has changed since the end of Russia’s conflict with Georgia in 2008. The VDV, a force much admired in the Russian news media and society, has, in fact, escaped fairly unscathed during the comprehensive reform of the Russian army more generally over the last few years. In large part this has been because of the personality of the current head of the VDV, Lieutenant General Vladimir Shamanov."
    • Published On: 12/1/2011
  •  The Saudi-Iranian Rivalry and the Future of Middle East Security

    The Saudi-Iranian Rivalry and the Future of Middle East Security

    The Saudi-Iranian Rivalry and the Future of Middle East Security Dr W Andrew Terrill Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Saudi Arabia and Iran have often behaved as serious rivals for influence in the Middle East, especially the Gulf area, since at least Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution and the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq War. While both nations define themselves as Islamic, the differences between their foreign policies could hardly be more dramatic. In most respects, Saudi Arabia is a regional status quo power, while Iran often seeks revolutionary change throughout the Gulf area and the wider Middle East with varying degrees of intensity. Saudi Arabia also has strong ties with Western nations, while Iran views the United States as its most dangerous enemy. Perhaps the most important difference between the two nations is that Saudi Arabia is a conservative Sunni Muslim Arab state, while Iran is a Shi’ite state with senior politicians who often view their country as the defender and natural leader of Shi’ites throughout the region. The rivalry between Riyadh and Tehran has been reflected in the politics of a number of regional states where these two powers exercise influence."
    • Published On: 12/1/2011
  •  The Strategic Logic of the Contemporary Security Dilemma

    The Strategic Logic of the Contemporary Security Dilemma

    The Strategic Logic of the Contemporary Security Dilemma Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "From the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 to the end of World War II and beyond the Cold War period, the prevailing assumption was that interstate warfare would continue to be the dominant threat to global peace and prosperity. Today’s wars, by contrast, are intrastate conflicts that take place mainly within—not across—national borders. As a consequence, the disease of intrastate conflict has been allowed to rage relatively unchecked across large areas of the world, and has devastated the lives of millions of human beings. At the same time, indirect and implicit unmet needs (e.g., poverty) lead people into greater and greater personal and collective insecurity."
    • Published On: 12/1/2011
  •  Arms Control and Proliferation Challenges to the Reset Policy

    Arms Control and Proliferation Challenges to the Reset Policy

    Arms Control and Proliferation Challenges to the Reset Policy Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph was presented at the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI)-Carnegie Council conference connected with the Council’s U.S. Global Engagement Program. In this case, the engagement in question is with Russia, and this monograph specifically addressed the issues of how those aspects of the reset policy with Moscow that concern arms control and proliferation are proceeding. It duly addresses the question of whether further reductions in strategic offensive weapons are likely anytime soon, i.e., is it possible to go beyond the parameters in the recently signed and so-called New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) treaty with respect to reductions. Other critical issues involve the issues of missile defenses that Moscow vehemently opposes and the question of tactical or nonstrategic nuclear weapons, which the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) wishes to have Russia reduce. "
    • Published On: 11/1/2011
  •  Forecasting Zero: U.S. Nuclear History and the Low Probability of Disarmament

    Forecasting Zero: U.S. Nuclear History and the Low Probability of Disarmament

    Forecasting Zero: U.S. Nuclear History and the Low Probability of Disarmament Mr Jonathan Pearl Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Over the past few years, a vigorous debate about the wisdom and mechanics of nuclear disarmament has emerged around the world, particularly in the United States. Washington’s current wave of support for disarmament was ignited unexpectedly in 2007 by a bipartisan group of national security experts. Calls for the elimination of nuclear weapons have existed for almost as long as the weapons themselves. But these developments, coupled with President Barack Obama’s clear support for disarmament and the successful ratification of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, have left American supporters of abolition feeling as if the scales may finally be weighted in favor of their goal—even though they acknowledge that it will not be easily achieved."
    • Published On: 11/1/2011
  •  Presidential Succession Scenarios in Egypt and Their Impact on U.S.-Egyptian Strategic Relations

    Presidential Succession Scenarios in Egypt and Their Impact on U.S.-Egyptian Strategic Relations

    Presidential Succession Scenarios in Egypt and Their Impact on U.S.-Egyptian Strategic Relations Mr Gregory Aftandilian Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The momentous events in Egypt since January 25, 2011, have focused the world’s attention on that critical country. Mostly young, pro-democracy activists appear to have successfully challenged Egypt’s authoritarian government and its long-time leader. President Hosni Mubarak has been driven from office and is reportedly in poor health. Hence, regime change is virtually certain. The Egyptian military, long a major power broker, gained popular support for its restrained reaction to the uprisings of January-February 2011 and currently (July 2011) the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, headed by Field Marshall Hussein Tantawi, leads the nation pending promised elections in the autumn. However, recent events suggest that the military may be reluctant to relinquish power fully, and popular unrest against it is rising. Thus, most scenarios discussed in this paper, or variations thereof, are still very possible."
    • Published On: 10/1/2011
  •  Mexico's "Narco-Refugees": The Looming Challenge for U.S. National Security

    Mexico's "Narco-Refugees": The Looming Challenge for U.S. National Security

    Mexico's "Narco-Refugees": The Looming Challenge for U.S. National Security Dr Paul Rexton Kan Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since 2006, when Mexican president Felipe Calderon declared war on the drug cartels, there has been a rise in the number of Mexican nationals seeking political asylum in the United States to escape the ongoing drug cartel violence in their home country. Political asylum cases in general are claimed by those who are targeted for their political beliefs or ethnicity in countries that are repressive or failing. Mexico is neither. Nonetheless, if the health of the Mexican state declines because criminal violence continues, increases, or spreads, U.S. communities will feel an even greater burden on their systems of public safety and public health from “narco-refugees.” Given the ever-increasing brutality of the cartels, the question is whether and how the United States Government should begin to prepare for what could be a new wave of migrants coming from Mexico. "
    • Published On: 10/1/2011
  •  Threat Posed by Mounting Vigilantism in Mexico

    Threat Posed by Mounting Vigilantism in Mexico

    Threat Posed by Mounting Vigilantism in Mexico Dr George W Grayson Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Until the 1980s, Mexico enjoyed relative freedom from violence. Ruthless drug cartels existed, but they usually abided by informal rules of the game hammered out between several capos and representatives of the dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which ruled the country in Tammany Hallfashion from 1929 until the 1990s. Relying on bribes or mordidas, the desperados pursued their illicit activities with the connivance of authorities, frequently through ad hoc pacts that might last days, weeks, or months. "
    • Published On: 9/1/2011
  •  Puncturing the Counterinsurgency Myth: Britain and Irregular Warfare in the Past, Present, and Future

    Puncturing the Counterinsurgency Myth: Britain and Irregular Warfare in the Past, Present, and Future

    Puncturing the Counterinsurgency Myth: Britain and Irregular Warfare in the Past, Present, and Future Dr Andrew Mumford Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Britain’s numerous counterinsurgency campaigns in the post-World War II era have resulted in a generally accepted academic assessment that this volume of experience equates to competence in the realm of irregular warfare. However, the British response to the complexities of 21st century insurgencies, particularly in their decentralized and globally networked form, has threatened to expose this competency as a colonial-era myth. Quantity of counterinsurgency combat experience has not equated to outright quality."
    • Published On: 9/1/2011
  •  China-Latin America Military Engagement: Good Will, Good Business, and Strategic Position

    China-Latin America Military Engagement: Good Will, Good Business, and Strategic Position

    China-Latin America Military Engagement: Good Will, Good Business, and Strategic Position Dr R Evan Ellis Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Over the past several years, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has expanded its military ties with Latin America in multiple important ways. High-level trips by Latin American defense and security personnel to the PRC and visits by their Chinese counterparts have become commonplace. The volume and sophistication of Chinese arms sold to the region has increased. Officer exchange programs, institutional visits, and other lower-level ties have also expanded. Chinese military personnel have begun participating in operations in the region in a modest, yet symbolically important manner..."
    • Published On: 8/1/2011
  •  The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union's Common Security and Defense Policy: Intersecting Trajectories

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union's Common Security and Defense Policy: Intersecting Trajectories

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union's Common Security and Defense Policy: Intersecting Trajectories Mr Sarwar A Kashmeri Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this study, Mr. Kashmeri argues his thesis that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) has evolved from a confident, mission driven Alliance with a clear objective, to an organization that appears to be in disarray, still looking for a unifying mission 20 years after its reason for creation—the Soviet Union—ceased to exist. Mr. Kashmeri maintains that the action to enforce United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1073 against Libya is the latest in a series of demonstrations that highlight the disarray of the Alliance. He states that after weeks of preparation and increasingly optimistic statements about its readiness to enforce the UNSCR, Britain, France, and the United States chose to intervene in Libya alone."
    • Published On: 7/1/2011
  •  The New Aztecs: Ritual and Restraint in Contemporary Western Military Operations

    The New Aztecs: Ritual and Restraint in Contemporary Western Military Operations

    The New Aztecs: Ritual and Restraint in Contemporary Western Military Operations Dr Zhivan Alach Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The idea that the military environment is constantly evolving, becoming more and more dangerous and technologically sophisticated, is a common one. In the past century, we have seen the emergence of total war, nuclear weapons, and bloody unconventional and asymmetric campaigns. We have used many of the offshoots of this evolutionary idea to guide our own setting of defense policy, seeing in the evolution a constant escalation, albeit one perhaps marred by occasional yet small oscillations. "
    • Published On: 7/1/2011
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