Collections

  •  Strategic Insights: Bridging the Civil-Military Gap

    Strategic Insights: Bridging the Civil-Military Gap

    Strategic Insights: Bridging the Civil-Military Gap Dr Tami Davis Biddle Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 11/10/2016
  •  Alternative Governance Structures in Megacities: Threats or Opportunities?

    Alternative Governance Structures in Megacities: Threats or Opportunities?

    Alternative Governance Structures in Megacities: Threats or Opportunities? Ms Diane E Chido Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Many cities are growing into “mega” land areas filled with complex terrain and populations where the U.S. military will undoubtedly have to engage. States often fail to provide basic services to some territories, leaving inhabitants disenfranchised. These gaps are then filled by social entrepreneurs, often ethnic or religious-based civil society groups—or even organized crime syndicates—who effectively identify niche needs in the marketplace and fill them more effectively than other competitors, including traditional state authorities. Leaders of these groups maintain control through various means, including: violence, coercion, and service provision; or through tribal, religious, or other cultural ties and structures."
    • Published On: 11/1/2016
  •  U.S.-China Competition: Asia-Pacific Land Force Implications – A U.S. Army War College Integrated Research Project in Support of U.S. Army Pacific Command and Headquarters, Department of the Army, Directorate of Strategy and Policy (HQDA G-35)

    U.S.-China Competition: Asia-Pacific Land Force Implications – A U.S. Army War College Integrated Research Project in Support of U.S. Army Pacific Command and Headquarters, Department of the Army, Directorate of Strategy and Policy (HQDA G-35)

    U.S.-China Competition: Asia-Pacific Land Force Implications – A U.S. Army War College Integrated Research Project in Support of U.S. Army Pacific Command and Headquarters, Department of the Army, Directorate of Strategy and Policy (HQDA G-35) Prof William G Braun III, Dr David Lai Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This research project is a Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA)-directed study, conducted by the Army War College and co-sponsored by the Commander, U.S. Army Pacific Command (USARPAC) and the Headquarters, Department of the Army, Directorate of Strategy and Policy (HQDA G-35). The report presents findings and recommendations derived from an 8-month, quick-turn, student-led research and analysis effort. The central theme of the research effort is U.S.-China competition and the development of relevant land force recommendations to compete effectively in the gray zone between peace and war."
    • Published On: 11/1/2016
  •  Should We Let the Bomb Spread?

    Should We Let the Bomb Spread?

    Should We Let the Bomb Spread? Mr Henry D Sokolski Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In 1966, Leonard Beaton, a journalist and strategic scholar, published a short book that asked: Must the bomb spread? Mr. Beaton’s query reflected the profoundly alarm with which proliferation was viewed shortly after the Cuban Missile Crisis. Today that alarm is all but absent; now, not only is proliferation increasingly viewed as a given (more of a fact than a problem), but some security experts actually see advantages in nuclear weapons spreading or, at least, little harm."
    • Published On: 11/1/2016
  •  Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems

    Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems

    Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems Dr David Lai Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 10/25/2016
  •  Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems

    Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems

    Strategic Insights: The "U.S. Factor" in China's Problems David Lai Article by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "There is a widely-shared view in China that the United States has ill will toward China and is always looking for opportunities to make trouble for China. The Chinese believe that this was the case when China was a poor developing nation; and they particularly believe it to be the case today as China is rapidly becoming a great power. The Chinese claim that U.S. influence on every aspect of Chinese foreign and domestic relations is so ubiquitous that they have a name for it: 'U.S. factor/shadow/specter' "
    • Published On: 10/25/2016
  •  The Quest for Military Cooperation in North Africa: Prospects and Challenges

    The Quest for Military Cooperation in North Africa: Prospects and Challenges

    The Quest for Military Cooperation in North Africa: Prospects and Challenges Dr Mohammed El-Katiri Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In the aftermath of the ousting of dictatorial regimes in 2011, the fragile political and security situations in Tunisia and Libya have contributed to the emergence of new threats that menace the stability of both countries and of their neighbors. Severe terrorist incidents have become frequent throughout the region. To name but one incident, the borders that Algeria shares with those two countries exposed it to a major terrorist attack on the Tiguentourine gas facility in January 2013."
    • Published On: 10/1/2016
  •  Strategic Insights: Cyber (In)Security, the Americas, and U.S. National Security

    Strategic Insights: Cyber (In)Security, the Americas, and U.S. National Security

    Dr. Jose de Arimateia da Cruz Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press According to the Organization of American States (OAS) in its report on “Latin American and Caribbean Cyber Security Trends” released in June 2014, Latin America and the Caribbean have the fastest growing Internet population in the world with 147 million users in 2013 and growing each year. While having more users and more network connections are great advancements for traditional developing nations, they also represent a potential threat. Audrey Kurth Cronin points out that “insurgents and terrorist groups have effectively used the Internet to support their operations for at least a decade. The tools of the global information age have helped them with administrative tasks, coordination of operations, recruitment of potential members, and communications among adherents.” While much of the discussion regarding potential enemy attacks on U.S. cyber critical infrastructure mainly focuses on China, Russia, and Iran, the Americas have been largely ignored in the literature. Why are the Americas important? Why should we be discussing its place within the U.S. national security strategic goals?
    • Published On: 9/12/2016
  •  An Arab NATO in the Making? Middle Eastern Military Cooperation Since 2011

    An Arab NATO in the Making? Middle Eastern Military Cooperation Since 2011

    An Arab NATO in the Making? Middle Eastern Military Cooperation Since 2011 Dr Florence Gaub Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Two features have been consistent in the Middle East and North Africa since the era of independence: ongoing violence of all sorts—and the absence of a collective security structure, which could tackle this violence. Since the end of World War II, the region has seen multiple attempts to organize collective and cooperative security, all of which failed."
    • Published On: 9/1/2016
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