Monographs

 

  •  The New Russia in the New Asia

    The New Russia in the New Asia

    The New Russia in the New Asia Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the past, Imperial and Soviet Russia played an active role in Asia. This is no less true for the current Russian republic. While Western analyses and policies may downplay Russia's presence in Asia, Russian leaders do not. In Asia, Russia exercises an important influence on regional developments. No less important is the way which policymakers in Moscow perceive their tasks and goals in Asia. These views will profoundly affect the further development of Russia's internal political, military, and economic structures."
    • Published On: 7/22/1994
  •  Two Historians in Technology and War

    Two Historians in Technology and War

    Two Historians in Technology and War Dr John F Guilmartin Jr, Sir Michael Howard Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "There is a tendency among military professionals, particularly in the United States, to look to history for "lessons." This is not wise. It has been well said the words, "All History Teaches..." are usually followed by bad history and worse logic. History is simply what historians write, and what they write is often determined by their prejudices. The best that even the best historians can do, on the basis of their knowledge about the past, is to pose questions and issue warnings about the future."
    • Published On: 7/20/1994
  •  Responding to Terrorism across the Technological Spectrum

    Responding to Terrorism across the Technological Spectrum

    Responding to Terrorism across the Technological Spectrum Dr Bruce Hoffman Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The 'revolution in military affairs,' it is argued, heralds a new era of warfare dominated by the American military's mastery of the conventional battlefield. 'Just as gunpowder, the mechanization of battle, and atomic weapons previously changed the fundamental conduct and nature of warfare, so will a combination of technological progress, doctrinal sophistication, and innovative force employment in turn render. . . existing methods of conducting warfare obsolete.' The assumption that U.S. armed forces alone will have the capability to harness all the elements of this revolution is in large measure derived from the demonstrated superiority of American combined arms over the much larger Iraqi forces during the 1991 Persian Gulf War."
    • Published On: 7/15/1994
  •  Another View of the Revolution in Military Affairs

    Another View of the Revolution in Military Affairs

    Another View of the Revolution in Military Affairs Mr Jeffrey R Cooper Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Mr. Cooper urges defense planners to determine what strategic--as opposed to operational--benefits might be derived from the RMA. He contends that making the internal reforms that will be required will be as challenging as coming to terms with the operational and strategic implications of the new technologies."
    • Published On: 7/15/1994
  •  Proliferation and Nonproliferation in Ukraine: Implications for European and U.S. Security

    Proliferation and Nonproliferation in Ukraine: Implications for European and U.S. Security

    Proliferation and Nonproliferation in Ukraine: Implications for European and U.S. Security Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "When the Soviet Union collapsed the new Ukrainian state inherited the nuclear weapons that had been deployed on it's territory. Through 1993 there was growing support in Ukraine for the establishment of a quid pro quo. Many Ukrainians felt that, in return for denuclearization, Ukraine should receive security and economic guarantees from both Washington and Moscow. Until then it would hold back on dismantling and transferring the weapons to Russia, signing the START treaties, and ratifying the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty. But in January 1994, after considerable coaxing and pressure, Ukraine agreed with Russia and the United States to proceed along those lines. This monograph examines the reasoning behind that decision and the implications of it for Ukraine's security and for its relationship with the United States."
    • Published On: 7/1/1994
  •  The Revolution in Military Affairs: A Framework for Defense Planning

    The Revolution in Military Affairs: A Framework for Defense Planning

    The Revolution in Military Affairs: A Framework for Defense Planning Dr Michael J Mazarr Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author of this monograph, Dr. Michael J. Mazarr, argues that the current revolution in military affairs is part of a larger sociopolitical transformation. The new technologies both propelling and resulting from this transformation are having a profound impact on warfare. Dr. Mazarr urges military and civilian strategists, planners, and decisionmakers to think about armed conflict in ways so novel that those used to dealing with "the unchanging truths about war" may feel threatened. To help deal with the ambiguities and complexities presented by the RMA, Dr. Mazarr offers a framework of four principles for defense planning."
    • Published On: 6/10/1994
  •  War in the Information Age

    War in the Information Age

    War in the Information Age COL James M Dubik, Gen Gordon R Sullivan Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "We are beginning to realize the emergence of a new age--the information age. On the one hand, the full dimensions of this new age, if indeed it is such, are unknown. On the other hand, the authors argue that enough is known to conclude that the conduct of war in the future will be profoundly different. Paradoxically, however, they claim that the nature of war will remain basically the same. In this monograph, General Sullivan and Colonel Dubik examine that paradox and draw some inferences from it."
    • Published On: 6/6/1994
  •  Nuclear Threats from Small States

    Nuclear Threats from Small States

    Nuclear Threats from Small States Mr Jerome H Kahan Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For decades, the United States has pursued nuclear nonproliferation as an important national security goal. At times, this objective was masked or even compromised by the overarching needs of managing the U.S.-Soviet nuclear balance and maintaining the Western Alliance. As the cold war faded, the problem of proliferation assumed an ever more prominent place in U.S. national security strategy."
    • Published On: 6/1/1994
  •  National Interest: From Abstraction to Strategy

    National Interest: From Abstraction to Strategy

    National Interest: From Abstraction to Strategy Dr Michael G Roskin Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The "national interest" is a composite declaration derived from those values that a nation prizes most–liberty, freedom, security. Interests are usually expressed in terms of physical survival, economic prosperity, and political sovereignty. The list invariably expands, and is ultimately shaped by subjective preferences and political debate. As an object of political debate, the concept of national interest serves to propose, justify, or denounce policies."
    • Published On: 5/1/1994
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