Monographs

 

  •  Strategic Horizons: The Military Implications of Alternative Futures

    Strategic Horizons: The Military Implications of Alternative Futures

    Strategic Horizons: The Military Implications of Alternative Futures Dr Steven Metz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "It is important to analyze long-term changes in the global security environment in order to begin preparation for the post-Force XXI U.S. Army. Existing currents of change suggest a number of feasible yet very different future security environments as defined by the primary source and form of violence conflict. Each would require a different type of U.S. Army."
    • Published On: 3/7/1997
  •  The Dynamics of Russian Weapon Sales to China

    The Dynamics of Russian Weapon Sales to China

    The Dynamics of Russian Weapon Sales to China Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Russia has recently sold or transferred many military weapons or technologies to China. Russian state policy has also officially joined with China in a relationship described as a strategic cooperative partnership. Some Russian diplomats also say that there is virtually complete identity with China on all issues of Asian and global security. Dr. Stephen Blank examines this relationship carefully for what it reveals about both states' international security policies."
    • Published On: 3/4/1997
  •  Haiti Update

    Haiti Update

    Haiti Update Dr Donald E Schulz Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This study reviews recent political and economic developments in Haiti and assesses the prospects for democratization, political stability and economic development. The report is pessimistic, but far from hopeless. While political violence and human rights violations persist and the economy is stagnant, the Preval administration and the Haitian Congress have finally made the hard decisions to press on with economic modernization, including partial privatization and civil service reforms."
    • Published On: 1/29/1997
  •  Tacit Acceptance and Watchful Eyes: Beijing's Views about the U.S.-ROK Alliance

    Tacit Acceptance and Watchful Eyes: Beijing's Views about the U.S.-ROK Alliance

    Tacit Acceptance and Watchful Eyes: Beijing's Views about the U.S.-ROK Alliance Dr Fei-Ling Wang Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "To understand China's foreign policy in the 1990s and the true attitude of Beijing towards the military presence of the United States in Northeast Asia, one must examine China's perception of the alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK). Public statements aside, the People's Republic of China (PRC) has shifted its traditional position and has tacitly accepted, even welcomed, the continuation of the U.S.-ROK alliance. Beijing views the institutionalized presence of the Americans in Northeast Asia as a stabilizing force, serving China's interest of maintaining the favorable status quo in the region. However, continued acceptance is not guaranteed; developments in the Sino-American relationship and the course of reunification of the Korean Peninsula will affect attitudes in the future."
    • Published On: 1/24/1997
  •  The Chemical Weapons Convention: Strategic Implications for the United States

    The Chemical Weapons Convention: Strategic Implications for the United States

    The Chemical Weapons Convention: Strategic Implications for the United States Mr Frederick J Vogel Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the following monograph, Frederick Vogel explores the historical, moral, and legal aspects of chemical warfare, and the strategic implications of the convention, including operational, policy, constitutional, and industrial impact for the United States. He concludes that, although "imperfect," the convention will contribute to U.S. national security."
    • Published On: 1/8/1997
  •  The Peace process, Phase One: Past Accomplishments, Future Concerns

    The Peace process, Phase One: Past Accomplishments, Future Concerns

    The Peace process, Phase One: Past Accomplishments, Future Concerns Dr Stephen C Pelletiere Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948, Jordan has been the linchpin in long-standing efforts to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict. Among Arab states, Jordan has the longest border with Israel and hosts the largest number of displaced Palestinians. Until 1967, Jordan governed the principal portion of pre-1948 Palestine that remained in Arab hands after the 1948 war, namely the West Bank territory including eastern Jerusalem. Jordan lost the West Bank to Israel in 1967, and King Hussein formally severed Jordan's administrative ties to the West Bank in 1988; however, in practice, the future of Jordan and the fate of the Palestinian community have remained closely linked."
    • Published On: 1/3/1997
  •  The ASEAN Regional Forum: Asian Security without an American Umbrella

    The ASEAN Regional Forum: Asian Security without an American Umbrella

    The ASEAN Regional Forum: Asian Security without an American Umbrella Dr Larry M Wortzel Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The Association of Southeast Asian Nations Regional Forum (ARF), first held in July 1994 in Bangkok, Thailand, is a unique, Asian-led experiment in multilateral security in Asia. It took shape at a time when the United States seemed to have withdrawn from its leading role in regional and world security, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. In fact, according to quotes attributed to a senior Chinese leader by former Assistant Secretary of Defense Charles Freeman, despite assurances from Washington, the perception in Asia is that the United States would never trade one of its cities (Los Angeles was the city in question) for the goal of securing peace for one of its friends in Asia."
    • Published On: 12/13/1996
  •  Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices

    Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices

    Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices Dr Thomas-Durell Young Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since the unification of Germany on October 3, 1990, the question of how Bonn will conduct its foreign and defense policies continues to be posited. Gone are the days when Paris "led" Western Europe and the Federal Republic of Germany tacitly accepted its supporting role. The Federal Republic now has all the composite elements to be a Great Power, with the exception of its own nuclear arsenal. Nonetheless, Bonn possesses the largest economy and population in Western and Central Europe, and plans to maintain the largest peacetime military establishment east of the Bug River. Even if Germany were to eschew any Great Power ambitions, it no longer has the luxury of denying either to itself or its allies that it does have important international responsibilities to which it must be prepared to contribute."
    • Published On: 12/1/1996
  •  Managing Strains in the Coalition: What to Do About Saddam?

    Managing Strains in the Coalition: What to Do About Saddam?

    Managing Strains in the Coalition: What to Do About Saddam? Dr Stephen C Pelletiere Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This study by Dr. Stephen Pelletiere examines how the Kurdish crisis developed, why--most disturbingly--the key coalition members divided in response to U.S. actions, and what factors might guide future U.S. policy. He concludes that U.S. policy needs reanchoring if we are to achieve our paramount interests in this vital region.
    • Published On: 11/15/1996
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