Letort Papers

 

  •  Deciding to Buy: Civil-Military Relations and Major Weapons Programs

    Deciding to Buy: Civil-Military Relations and Major Weapons Programs

    Deciding to Buy: Civil-Military Relations and Major Weapons Programs Mr Quentin E Hodgson Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this timely monograph, Mr. Quentin Hodgson explores how the civilian and military leadership of the Pentagon have debated and argued decisions on major weapons programs. Drawing on interviews with participants and archival research, he has demonstrated the enduring nature of these debates, despite efforts to improve, transform, and overhaul the defense planning and programming system..."
    • Published On: 11/1/2010
  •  Some of the Best Weapons for Counterinsurgents Do Not Shoot

    Some of the Best Weapons for Counterinsurgents Do Not Shoot

    Some of the Best Weapons for Counterinsurgents Do Not Shoot Retrieving data. Wait a few seconds and try to cut or copy again. Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "If the U.S. Army’s current experience in ongoing overseas operations like those in Iraq and Afghanistan are any indication, reconstruction has become an integral part of the American way of war. And judging from the disappointing results of reconstruction efforts in these operations, measured mostly in terms of the effect that such efforts have had on the course of these wars, there is much lacking in the Army’s understanding of reconstruction itself and the role that it will likely play in all future operations, especially in counterinsurgencies (COIN)."
    • Published On: 10/1/2010
  •  An Army Transformed: The U.S. Army's Post-Vietnam Recovery and the Dynamics of Change in Military Organizations

    An Army Transformed: The U.S. Army's Post-Vietnam Recovery and the Dynamics of Change in Military Organizations

    An Army Transformed: The U.S. Army's Post-Vietnam Recovery and the Dynamics of Change in Military Organizations LTC Suzanne C Nielsen Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "It is common to hear the argument that military organizations are incapable of reforming themselves. In this paper, Lieutenant Colonel Suzanne Nielsen takes the opposite position. It is not only possible for senior military leaders to change their organizations, it is also necessary since only these leaders are likely to be able to do it."
    • Published On: 9/1/2010
  •  Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of Its Senior Level Officer Corps?

    Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of Its Senior Level Officer Corps?

    Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of Its Senior Level Officer Corps? Dr James G Pierce Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Organization theory hypothesizes that an organization’s culture enables its members to work through the basic problems of survival in, and adaptation to, the external environment. Organizational culture also guides the organization’s development and maintenance of internal processes and procedures that perpetuate adaptability and promote continued existence. Consequently, organizational culture has considerable impact on an organization’s behavior at any given time, particularly on organizational effectiveness. However, little literature and even less data discuss the impact of organizational culture within military organizations and, more importantly, the impact that organizational culture may have on the development of an organization’s leaders."
    • Published On: 9/1/2010
  •  Somalia: Line in the Sand--Identification of MYM Vulnerabilities

    Somalia: Line in the Sand--Identification of MYM Vulnerabilities

    Somalia: Line in the Sand--Identification of MYM Vulnerabilities LTC Eloy E Cuevas, Ms Madeleine Wells Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Continuing instability in Somalia has increased concern that terrorists who seek to establish a foothold in Africa may use such insecure places as a safe haven and launching pad. Several attempts have been made to establish lawful governments in Somalia; however, warlord and clan interests have managed to take center stage among the population. The Somali-based al-Shabaab (also known as the Mujahidin Youth Movement [MYM]) is a militant organization born out of both successive regional turmoil and international salafi-jihadi ideology, which continues to actively undermine the United Nations (UN)-supported African Union (AU) peacekeeping force, the fledging Somali Transitional Federal Government (TFG), and all UN efforts to support Somalis in creating a stable state. "
    • Published On: 9/1/2010
  •  Chinese Energy Security: The Myth of the PLAN's Frontline Status

    Chinese Energy Security: The Myth of the PLAN's Frontline Status

    Chinese Energy Security: The Myth of the PLAN's Frontline Status Dr Ryan Clarke Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The continued impressive growth and development of China, while always of critical strategic importance, has surged in recent years to the forefront of the consciousness of American policymakers, scholars, and the news media, as well as the general public. This trend has been accelerated by the staying power that China demonstrated following its relatively graceful weathering of the global financial crisis, in the process defying a wide range of doomsday prophecies of massive organized riots by newly unemployed rural factory workers and various other classes of people angry with Beijing over economic slowdown or stagnation. "
    • Published On: 8/1/2010
  •  Defense Energy Resilience: Lessons from Ecology

    Defense Energy Resilience: Lessons from Ecology

    Defense Energy Resilience: Lessons from Ecology Mr David Kerner, Dr Scott Thomas Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Energy security is a fundamental requirement for national security, and global energy competition threatens to make Department of Defense (DoD) missions increasingly vulnerable to the vagaries of energy supply. Dr. Scott Thomas and Mr. David Kerner argue that DoD’s approach to energy security must accommodate a highly uncertain outlook for energy resource availability. The authors argue that while U.S. energy security needs are currently met, the shrinking gap between global supply and demand draws the world closer to a tipping point at which competition disrupts social and geopolitical normalizing forces, and conflict becomes likely. This analysis offers key insights into what a shifting energy security environment is and provides a novel theoretical framework for how the United States can best respond to it."
    • Published On: 8/1/2010
  •  Endgame for the West in Afghanistan? Explaining the Decline in Support for the War in Afghanistan in the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, France and Germany

    Endgame for the West in Afghanistan? Explaining the Decline in Support for the War in Afghanistan in the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, France and Germany

    Endgame for the West in Afghanistan? Explaining the Decline in Support for the War in Afghanistan in the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, France and Germany Mr Charles A Miller Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Domestic support for the war is often mentioned as one of the key battlegrounds of the Afghan conflict. A variety of explanations have been put forward in the media and in the political realm to explain why this war, which once commanded overwhelming popular support in almost all participating countries, is now opposed by a majority, even in the United States itself. Casualties, lack of equitable multilateral burden sharing, confused and shifting rationales on the part of the political leadership for the war and a “contagion” effect from the unpopularity of the Iraq war have all been cited at one time or another."
    • Published On: 6/1/2010
  •  Shades of CORDS in the Kush: The False Hope of "Unity of Effort" in American Counterinsurgency

    Shades of CORDS in the Kush: The False Hope of "Unity of Effort" in American Counterinsurgency

    Shades of CORDS in the Kush: The False Hope of "Unity of Effort" in American Counterinsurgency Mr Henry Nuzum Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The past 2 years have been the most violent of the Afghan insurgency thus far. Taliban and affiliates seek to undermine the state and sap the will of the occupying force. In response, the United States and the coalition pursue a counterinsurgency (COIN) campaign that coordinates military, political, and economic assistance to the Afghan government so that it may provide security and services to its people. If the effort succeeds, the government will win the confidence of the citizens, who will increasingly reject the insurgents."
    • Published On: 4/1/2010
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