Strategic Issues

  •  Work Group 4 - Maximizing Access to Service Reserve Elements

    Work Group 4 - Maximizing Access to Service Reserve Elements

    Work Group 4 - Maximizing Access to Service Reserve Elements Prof James O Kievit Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the Center for Strategic Leadership at the United States Army War College has conducted an annual Reserve Component Symposium dedicated to examining issues regarding the role of the Armed Services’ Reserve Components in homeland defense and civil support. That trend continued in this year’s forum, held 28 & 29 May 2008 at the War College’s Center for Strategic Leadership. Much of the symposium’s discussion centered on two recent research reports: the congressionally mandated Commission on the National Guard and Reserves and the Phase III Report of the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Beyond Goldwater-Nichols series, The Future of the National Guard and Reserves."
    • Published On: 7/15/2008
  •  Work Group 1 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the NGB with Other DOD Organizations in Responding to Crises

    Work Group 1 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the NGB with Other DOD Organizations in Responding to Crises

    Work Group 1 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the NGB with Other DOD Organizations in Responding to Crises Mr Scott T Forster, Prof Bert B Tussing Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "On 28 & 29 May 2008, the United States Army War College conducted the 7th annual Reserve Component Symposium at the Center for Strategic Leadership at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Among other issues, symposium workshop participants were charged with assessing the evolving relationship of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) to other Department of Defense (DoD) organizations which have domestic crisis response requirements. For the sake of this discussion, DoD organizations which share a crisis response with NGB were limited to the States’ National Guard, USNORTHCOM, the Joint Staff, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. While each organization will be addressed in turn, there were several recurring discussion themes associated with all four."
    • Published On: 7/15/2008
  •  Work Group 2 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the National Guard to Other Components of Domestic Crisis Response

    Work Group 2 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the National Guard to Other Components of Domestic Crisis Response

    Work Group 2 - Assessing the Evolving Relationship of the National Guard to Other Components of Domestic Crisis Response Dennis M Murphy Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The new National Strategy for Homeland Security, the Commission on the National Guard and Reserves, the National Defense Authorization Act of 2008, Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8, Annex 1, and a host of other initiatives have signaled what could result in significant changes in the roles played by the Reserve Component in domestic preparedness, response and recovery operations. The National Guard Bureau (NGB) in particular may be postured to take on expanded responsibilities in these areas as its Chief assumes a new status as an advisor to the Secretary of Defense."
    • Published On: 7/15/2008
  •  Work Group 3 - The New Criticality of the National Guard Bureau

    Work Group 3 - The New Criticality of the National Guard Bureau

    Work Group 3 - The New Criticality of the National Guard Bureau Prof Bert B Tussing Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "On 28 & 29 May 2008, the United States Army War College conducted the 7th annual Reserve Component Symposium at the Center for Strategic Leadership at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. The series began in 2000, and is dedicated to examining issues of critical importance to the Services’ Reserve Component and the United States National Guard. Following 9/11, the preponderance of these symposiums have been devoted to issues surrounding the vital role of the Reserve Component in homeland security, homeland defense and civil support. The trend continued in this year’s forum, which was devoted to examining the evolving role of the Guard and Service reserves in support of civilian authorities. In the wake of studies, new legislative directives, and executive initiatives devoted to those ends, that role is undergoing remarkable change."
    • Published On: 7/15/2008
  •  Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 3 (Apr-Jun 08)

    Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 3 (Apr-Jun 08)

    Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 3 (Apr-Jun 08) LTC Art Loureiro, Professor James Kievit, Mr. John Auger, Mr. William O. Waddell, COL (Ret.) B.F. Griffard, LTC Edward McLarney, Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 7/15/2008
  •  Wars of Ideas and the War of Ideas

    Wars of Ideas and the War of Ideas

    Wars of Ideas and the War of Ideas Dr Antulio J Echevarria II Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Despite widespread emphasis on the importance of winning the war of ideas in recent strategic literature, we find few analytical studies of wars of ideas as such. With that in mind, this monograph offers a brief examination of four common types of wars of ideas, and uses that as a basis for analyzing how the United States and its allies and strategic partners might proceed in the current war of ideas. "
    • Published On: 6/1/2008
  •  Strategic Vision Workshop; National Grand Strategy – A Constellation of Choices

    Strategic Vision Workshop; National Grand Strategy – A Constellation of Choices

    Strategic Vision Workshop; National Grand Strategy – A Constellation of Choices Prof Douglas B Campbell, Prof Philip M Evans, LTC Artur M Loureiro, MG Robert M Williams Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The United States Army War College (USAWC), in support of the Army Staff and in cooperation with national security faculty and researchers at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Security Studies Program, and Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, conducted a series of workshops from 7-10 April 2008 entitled Strategic Vision Workshop: National Grand Strategy. The Strategic Vision Workshop was organized to assist the Department of the Army in the understanding of Grand Strategy and future policy options that will prepare the Army to meet challenges in a world of persistent conflict."
    • Published On: 5/15/2008
  •  Adaptability of Land Forces to 21st Century Security Challenges

    Adaptability of Land Forces to 21st Century Security Challenges

    Adaptability of Land Forces to 21st Century Security Challenges Prof Bernard F Griffard Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Transforming a nation’s military to face 21st century challenges requires recognition of the need for change and then taking action to accomplish that change. Neither component of this two-step process is easy, but adapting the national military culture and equipping the force for full spectrum operations is the hardest part. With this in mind, the 2008 Land Forces Symposium brought together Army commanders or their representatives from 23 countries within the U.S. Central Command region to discuss the Adaptability of Land Forces to 21st Century Security Challenges. "
    • Published On: 5/15/2008
  •  U.S. Foreign Policy and Regime Instability

    U.S. Foreign Policy and Regime Instability

    U.S. Foreign Policy and Regime Instability Dr James Meernik Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This Letort Paper examines the relationship between U.S. military ties with foreign states and the extent to which the depth of these ties influences the level of political instability and violence in those states. Many pundits and scholars have criticized U.S. foreign policy for its reliance on military means of influence and have argued that other foreign policy tools, such as economic aid, cultural exchanges, and diplomacy can better promote American interests. Yet, few scholars have chosen to evaluate empirically whether the military relationship encourages or discourages political instability and violence in these nations. The author, Dr. James Meernik, analyzes these issues in a systematic and objective fashion and finds that the relationships between a U.S. military presence, U.S. military aid, the use of military force, and other factors are much more complex and subtle than many have believed."
    • Published On: 5/1/2008
  •  Albania - Observations on a Changing Nation

    Albania - Observations on a Changing Nation

    Albania - Observations on a Changing Nation COL William R Applegate, COL Patrick O Carpenter, Prof Bernard F Griffard Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Today’s nation of Albania is the result of a long tortuous journey through history, during which it was mostly not treated well. Thought to be descended from the Illyrian Albanoi tribe, Albanians have been subjugated by Philip of Macedonia, Tiberius of Rome, the Ottoman Turks, and Mussolini’s Italian Army. Geographically, Albania has encompassed much of the area we know as the Balkans; it has also been partitioned and disappeared as an entity from the maps of Europe. To German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck at the 1878 Congress of Berlin Albania was no more than a “geographical expression.” It was not until 1913, with the end of the Second Balkan War and the conclusion of the Treaty of Bucharest, that the boundaries of today’s Albania took form."
    • Published On: 4/15/2008
  •  Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 2 (Jan-Mar 08)

    Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 2 (Jan-Mar 08)

    Collins Center Quarterly Update, Vol 10, Iss. 2 (Jan-Mar 08) Colonel Brad Ward, Harry V. Phillips, Ritchie L. Dion, John Auger, Bill Waddell, Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 4/10/2008
  •  The Strategy Deficit

    The Strategy Deficit

    The Strategy Deficit Mr Nathan P Freier Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "An honest survey of post-Cold War national security policy exhibits a dangerous strategy deficit. The word “strategy” is overused. The concept, too, is poorly applied. It is many things to contemporary policymakers except, well—strategy. In the current environment, strategic communications and strategy have become synonymous. Strategic communications is the carefully crafted but overly general and widely consumable articulation of key political messages—“assure, deter, dissuade, defeat”; “as they stand up, we’ll stand down”; “clear, hold, build”; “phased strategic redeployment”; etc, etc, etc..."
    • Published On: 3/20/2008
  •  New Media and the Warfighter: Workshop Initial Impressions

    New Media and the Warfighter: Workshop Initial Impressions

    New Media and the Warfighter: Workshop Initial Impressions Dennis M Murphy Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Managing media and “information effects” is a hallmark of the current geo-strategic environment in which the U.S. military fights. The global information revolution and rapid spread of the Internet and other digital media have leveled the playing field between nation-states, non-state actors, multinational corporations and individuals. Anyone armed with mobile technologies such as a camera cell phone and access to the Internet is capable of affecting strategic outcomes at very low cost, using a minimal information infrastructure. The U.S. military has increasingly leveraged advances in information technology to gain advantages in the modern battlefield and to tell their story on a macro level, but has just recently begun to exploit the exploding technology realm at the micro level by co-opting the use of YouTube and blogs to help achieve objectives. Clearly, managing the “message” while controlling the necessary technological “means” represent critical challenges in today’s military operating environment."
    • Published On: 3/15/2008
  •  Collins Center Update Volume 10, Issue 1 Winter 2008

    Collins Center Update Volume 10, Issue 1 Winter 2008

    Collins Center Update Volume 10, Issue 1 Winter 2008 Colonel Phil Evans, Ritchie L. Dion, Colonel (Ret.) Eugene L. Thompson Collins Center Update by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership
    • Published On: 3/14/2008
  •  Intelligence Scotomas in Central and South America, The Proteus Monograph Series, Volume 1, Issue 4

    Intelligence Scotomas in Central and South America, The Proteus Monograph Series, Volume 1, Issue 4

    Intelligence Scotomas in Central and South America, The Proteus Monograph Series, Volume 1, Issue 4 John B Alexander Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership, Proteus Monograph Series Fellows Program " 'Why should I care?' This response from a U.S. Army staff officer may seem like a strange introduction to a monograph on national security issues, but it actually strikes at the crux of the problem. The comment was made by a lieutenant colonel assigned to the Department of the Army’s G-3 office when told that there were significant problems emerging in South America. He is far from alone in his reflexive analysis, or lack thereof. It is indicative of the understaffed, overworked, and terminally focused attitude that permeates everything in the Pentagon. Combat pilots call this target fixation, and for the Department of Defense, the current target is Iraq and the Middle East."
    • Published On: 3/1/2008
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