Regional Issues

  •  After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia

    After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia

    After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the course of its wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. military has deployed forces to hitherto undreamt of destinations in Central Asia and the Caucasus. These deployments reflect more than the exigencies of specific contingencies, but rather are the latest stage in a revolution in strategic affairs that has intersected with the coinciding revolution in military affairs. Thanks to the linked developments in these two processes, the Transcaspian area has now become an area of strategic importance to the United States for many reasons, and not just energy."
    • Published On: 7/1/2005
  •  North Korea's Strategic Intentions

    North Korea's Strategic Intentions

    North Korea's Strategic Intentions Dr Andrew Scobell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "North Korea poses a key challenge to the global community of states. Sometimes viewed as primarily a nuclear or proliferation challenge, Pyongyang actually presents the United States and other countries with multiple problems. As the 2005 National Defense Strategy of the United States notes, these challenges include “traditional, irregular, and catastrophic.” While each dimension of these threat capabilities are fairly clear and, with the exception of the third, readily documented, North Korea’s intentions are a much more controversial subject upon which specialists reach widely disparate conclusions."
    • Published On: 7/1/2005
  •  U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America

    U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America

    U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America Dr R Evan Ellis Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Evan Ellis seeks to do several things. He documents and examines the character of the new and increasing Chinese engagement in the Western Hemisphere. He then takes the analysis a step further by examining some of the potential dynamics of the Chinese engagement and its consequences for the long-term security interests of the United States. Dr. Ellis argues that China is both a significant competitor, and a potential partner of the United States in the region. Although he argues that China increasingly will vie with the United States for the hemisphere’s resources and political allegiances, he also notes that China’s growing dependence on its trade and investment in Latin America will give it security and stability interests that coincide with those of the United States."
    • Published On: 6/1/2005
  •  Saudi Arabia: Islamic Threat, Political Reform, and the Global War on Terror

    Saudi Arabia: Islamic Threat, Political Reform, and the Global War on Terror

    Saudi Arabia: Islamic Threat, Political Reform, and the Global War on Terror Dr Sherifa D Zuhur Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "U.S. foreign policy and the domestic concerns of Middle Eastern states are influencing the pursuit of the global war on terror in the Middle East. A close view of Saudi Arabia reveals the complex interaction of these forces. The U.S. relationship with Saudi Arabia and the global war on terror are important challenges to the U.S. administration that have region-wide ramifications. Saudi Arabia has been facing down Islamist insurgency along with other challenges since September 11, 2001, and with even more urgency since May 2003. "
    • Published On: 3/1/2005
  •  Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea

    Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea

    Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "President Bush’s February 2005 meeting with European and Russian leaders represented an attempt to repair relations with each of these governments, with NATO, and with the European Union (EU). While Iraq, Iran, and Israel probably were the main issues in these meetings, recent events in the Black Sea basin provide an enormous opportunity to advance a common Western agenda and even possibly to associate Russia with an extension of the realm of security in Europe."
    • Published On: 3/1/2005
  •  Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera?

    Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera?

    Is there a Positive Side to Al Jazeera? Dr W Andrew Terrill Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the rogues’ gallery of contemporary American politics, one of our chief villains is the Qatari satellite television station, al Jazeera. This station at various times has been charged with being a bin Laden mouthpiece, pro-Saddam Hussein, insensitive to U.S. casualties, and willing to find bad motives in just about everything that the United States does in the region. "
    • Published On: 2/1/2005
  •  Strategic Implications of Intercommunal Warfare in Iraq

    Strategic Implications of Intercommunal Warfare in Iraq

    Strategic Implications of Intercommunal Warfare in Iraq Dr W Andrew Terrill Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The future of Iraq is uncertain. The country is in a dangerous phase. The removal of a brutal dictatorship by coalition forces in April 2003 has given the Iraqi people hope for a new and better political system, where individuals do not have to live in continuing fear and uncertainty. Nevertheless, the Iraqi people must also address the difficult challenges of self-government for a diverse population, with major ethnic and sectarian groups that often maintain widely divergent agendas. If they fail to do this and an ethnic/sectarian war ensues, the consequences will be dire, not only for Iraq, but for the entire Middle Eastern region."
    • Published On: 2/1/2005
  •  It's Asia (Again)

    It's Asia (Again)

    It's Asia (Again) Dr Andrew Scobell Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "One of the persistent claims made as the 20th century came to a close was that Asia and the Pacific were increasingly significant to the United States and the world. Analysts and commentators proclaimed that we were entering a “Pacific Century” and pointed to the rising power of large states such as China and India. Japan has been a major economic power for decades but the growth rates experienced by China and more recently by India, and expanding trade flows suggest the world’s economic center of gravity is indeed shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific."
    • Published On: 1/1/2005
  •  U.S.-Ukraine Military Relations and the Value of Interoperability

    U.S.-Ukraine Military Relations and the Value of Interoperability

    U.S.-Ukraine Military Relations and the Value of Interoperability Mr Leonid I Polyakov Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Ukraine has been a pivotal actor in Eurasia since its independence in 1991. Ukraine’s destiny is critical to the security of the entire post-Soviet zone, and both it and the United States always have acted on that assumption. The stated goal of Ukrainian defense policy long has been to integrate with Euro-Atlantic structures like the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and this goal has been one of the chief objectives of the United States, as well. However, to move from rhetoric to implementation is particularly difficult where the defense reform of a post-Soviet state has been concerned, and Ukraine is no exception. Nevertheless, in the past few years Ukraine has begun to make remarkable progress towards its self-professed goal of defense integration with Western structures."
    • Published On: 12/1/2004
  •  Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba Dr Max G Manwaring Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Four uncomfortable questions arise, even in circumspect circles, regarding the possible succession of power in Cuba. First, assuming the nearly 80-year old Fidel Castro is mortal, 'Who will succeed him when he dies?' Second, 'What role will the Cuban armed forces play in the transition process?' Third, 'What could happen to disrupt that process?' And, finally, 'Will the United States respond to the event in an ad hoc manner, or will a plan be in place to help ensure U.S. interests?' "
    • Published On: 9/1/2004
  •  Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East

    Strategic Ends in the Middle East LTC Raymond A Millen Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "At times, it is difficult to maintain focus on strategic ends while embroiled in a conflict. This is especially true as soldiers and marines battle Iraqi insurgents under close media scrutiny, while pundits question the Iraq war as a means to the Global War on Terror (GWOT) ends. As a topical issue of rectitude, the decision to invade Iraq needs to pass to the historians—continued debate on that issue is a distraction."
    • Published On: 7/1/2004
  •  China and North Korea: From Comrades-In-Arms to Allies at Arm's Length

    China and North Korea: From Comrades-In-Arms to Allies at Arm's Length

    China and North Korea: From Comrades-In-Arms to Allies at Arm's Length Dr Andrew Scobell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The China-North Korea relationship remains the most enduring, uninterrupted bilateral friendship for both the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). This brother-in-arms relationship was solidified early during the Korean War. Sharing a common border and ideology, both China and North Korea confront the frustration of divided nations. And while, on the one hand, each views the United States as hostile, Beijing and Pyongyang, on the other hand, appear to crave better relations with Washington."
    • Published On: 3/1/2004
  •  Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries

    Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries

    Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries Mr Roger N McDermott Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Roger N. McDermott offers a framework for improving the antiterrorist capabilities of the Central Asian militaries. This includes increased and focused military training with a special emphasis on Special Forces units. The training should take place within a regional train and equip program to increase effectiveness and efficiency. But, McDermott argues, all assistance to the Central Asian states must complement broader diplomatic efforts to promote social, economic, and political reform."
    • Published On: 2/1/2004
  •  The Future of the Australian-U.S. Security Relationship

    The Future of the Australian-U.S. Security Relationship

    The Future of the Australian-U.S. Security Relationship Dr Rod Lyon, Prof William T Tow Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Australia is an increasingly important ally for the United States. It is willing to be part of challenging global missions, and its strong economy and growing self-confidence suggest a more prominent role in both global and regional affairs. Moreover, its government has worked hard to strengthen the link between Canberra and Washington. Political and strategic affinities between the two countries have been reflected in--and complemented by--practiced military interoperability, as the two allies have sustained a pattern of security cooperation in relation to East Timor, Afghanistan and Iraq in the last 4 years."
    • Published On: 12/1/2003
  •  Insurgency in Nepal

    Insurgency in Nepal

    Insurgency in Nepal Dr Thomas A Marks Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "A decade has passed since the end of the Cold War, and insurgency remains a major factor on the world scene. Whether driven by separatism, religious alienation, or ideological desire to restructure the state, insurgents are as active now as in the earlier Cold War era of state support. Indeed, forced to rely more upon their own devices, insurgencies have posed increasingly complex problems for the globe’s numerous weak states which fi nd themselves challenged by a growing array of development and population issues."
    • Published On: 12/1/2003
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