Regional Issues

  •  Avoiding Vietnam: The U.S. Army's Response to Defeat in Southeast Asia

    Avoiding Vietnam: The U.S. Army's Response to Defeat in Southeast Asia

    Avoiding Vietnam: The U.S. Army's Response to Defeat in Southeast Asia Dr Conrad C Crane Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Dr. Crane asserts that the Army must change in order to operate effectively in the full spectrum of future requirements, and it is time to reexamine the war in Vietnam. His study also draws attention to the service’s “Lessons Learned” process, and provides insights as to how the experience gained in Operation ENDURING FREEDOM should be analyzed and applied."
    • Published On: 9/1/2002
  •  A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power

    A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power

    A 21st Century Security Architecture for the Americas: Multilateral Cooperation, Liberal Peace, and Soft Power COL Joseph R Nunez Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph by Colonel Joseph R. Núñez is a constructive response to the question of “How can the United States best develop security cooperation within the Americas?” In it, he develops the necessary background to make the persuasive argument that it is time for the United States to employ strategic restraint and reassurance of allies to develop a new security architecture that is effective and efficient, not to mention reflecting of our values and interests."
    • Published On: 8/1/2002
  •  Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response

    Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response

    Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Global political violence is clashing with global economic integration. More often than not, the causes and consequences of the resultant instabilities tend to be exploited by such destabilizers as rogue states, substate and transnational political actors, insurgents, illegal drug traffickers, organized criminals, warlords, ethnic cleansers, militant fundamentalists, and 1,000 other “snakes with a cause” and the will to conduct terrorist and other asymmetric warfare. The intent is to impose self-determined desires for “change” on a society, nation-state, and/or other perceived symbols of power in the global community—and, perhaps, revert to the questionable glories of the 12th century."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
  •  China and Strategic Culture

    China and Strategic Culture

    China and Strategic Culture Dr Andrew Scobell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The author of this monograph, Dr. Andrew Scobell, examines the impact of strategic culture on 21st century China. He contends that the People’s Republic of China’s security policies and its tendency to use military force are influenced not only by elite understandings of China’s own strategic tradition, but also by their understandings of the strategic cultures of other states."
    • Published On: 5/1/2002
  •  The Past as Prologue: A History of U.S. Counterinsurgency Policy in Colombia, 1958-66

    The Past as Prologue: A History of U.S. Counterinsurgency Policy in Colombia, 1958-66

    The Past as Prologue: A History of U.S. Counterinsurgency Policy in Colombia, 1958-66 Mr Dennis M Rempe Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, the author outlines the history of U.S. counterinsurgency policy and the recommendations made by U.S. Special Survey Teams in Colombia from 1958-66. The monograph comes at a time when the United States seriously is considering broadening its policy toward Colombia and addressing Colombia’s continuing internal war in a global and regional context. Thus, this report provides a point of departure from which policymakers in the United States and Colombia can review where we have been, where we are, and where we need to go."
    • Published On: 3/1/2002
  •  Colombian Army Adaptation to FARC Insurgency

    Colombian Army Adaptation to FARC Insurgency

    Colombian Army Adaptation to FARC Insurgency Dr Thomas A Marks Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph addresses the Colombian Army’s adaptation to the insurgency in that country. It outlines the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) threat to the control of the national territory and how the insurgents intend to achieve that objective. Then, the author analyzes the measures the Colombian Army has taken to counter the threat. He concludes that no one in the Colombian political establishment is directing the counterinsurgency war, and that the Army has been left to conduct the fight by itself. Recommendations range from the strategic to the operational levels. They argue the need for (1) a coordinated and integrated national campaign plan; (2) cogent and enforceable emergency laws and regulations; (3) enhanced information warfare; and, (4) an enhanced operational flexibility."
    • Published On: 1/1/2002
  •  Colombia's Paramilitaries: Criminals or Political Force?

    Colombia's Paramilitaries: Criminals or Political Force?

    Colombia's Paramilitaries: Criminals or Political Force? Mr David Spencer Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph provides a sobering discussion of some important facts regarding Colombia’s paramilitary organizations. It points out that the paramilitary “self-defense” organizations pose a complex problem for the Colombian state in its search for a solution to current 40-plus-year-old internal war. First, the paramilitaries represent some important sectors of society and enjoy more popular support from the Colombian people than the insurgents..."
    • Published On: 12/1/2001
  •  Chinese Information Warfare: A Phantom Menace or Emerging Threat?

    Chinese Information Warfare: A Phantom Menace or Emerging Threat?

    Chinese Information Warfare: A Phantom Menace or Emerging Threat? Mr Toshi Yoshihara Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Mao Tse-tung counseled, “To achieve victory we must as far as possible make the enemy blind and deaf by sealing his eyes and ears, and drive his commanders to distraction by creating confusion in their minds.” Few concepts mesh so contextually with Mao than the Chinese approach to Information Warfare (IW). As the People’s Republic of China struggles with its national military strategy, IW offers opportunities to win wars without the traditional clash of arms."
    • Published On: 11/1/2001
  •  The Costs of Conflict: The Impact on China of a Future War

    The Costs of Conflict: The Impact on China of a Future War

    The Costs of Conflict: The Impact on China of a Future War Dr Andrew Scobell Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "A widely held belief is that China will not use force against Taiwan. Frequently, one of two major assumptions is made to justify this assertion: first, Chinese leaders realize that the economic cost of such an operation would be unacceptable; second, China’s leaders recognize that, for at least the next decade or so, any attempt to seize Taiwan would be doomed to failure. Both these assumptions are questionable and indeed downright dangerous."
    • Published On: 10/1/2001
  •  Funding Defense: Challenges of Buying Military Capability in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Funding Defense: Challenges of Buying Military Capability in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Funding Defense: Challenges of Buying Military Capability in Sub-Saharan Africa COL Daniel W Henk, Dr Martin Revayi Rupiya Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Martin Rupiya, Director of the University of Zimbabwe’s Centre for Defence Studies, and Daniel Henk of the Air War College provide one of the first comprehensive studies of defense budgeting practices in Africa. They assess both the problems with these practices, and fruitful avenues of reform. By doing so, they provide a solid roadmap both for African leaders and for Americans concerned with the development of greater security in the region."
    • Published On: 9/1/2001
  •  The Regional Security Crisis in the Andes: Patterns of State Response

    The Regional Security Crisis in the Andes: Patterns of State Response

    The Regional Security Crisis in the Andes: Patterns of State Response Dr Judith A Gentleman Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For some time it has been apparent that the crisis of Colombia is no longer confined to that country. In fact, under no imaginable scenario can Colombia’s problems be contained within it. The activities of drug traffickers and guerrillas are on the rise in the entire region, coming from Colombia. Given such compelling evidence of spillover, why has a regional, cooperative response been so slow in taking shape? Dr. Gentleman goes right to the heart of the matter: a pattern of competing objectives and inherent tensions."
    • Published On: 6/1/2001
  •  European Perceptions of Plan Colombia: A Virtual Contribution to a Virtual War and Peace Plan?

    European Perceptions of Plan Colombia: A Virtual Contribution to a Virtual War and Peace Plan?

    European Perceptions of Plan Colombia: A Virtual Contribution to a Virtual War and Peace Plan? Dr Joaquin Roy Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Professor Roy, a Spaniard with valuable sources throughout Europe, notes that Europeans apparently do not approve of the seeming U.S. emphasis on providing military equipment and training to Colombia for a counternarcotics effort in what they see as a larger strategic political conflict. At the same time, he reports that Europeans are not only concerned with the counternarcotics violence in Colombia, but also with the economic, security, and political spillover effects for neighboring countries."
    • Published On: 5/1/2001
  •  The Search for Accountability and Transparency in PLAN COLOMBIA: Reforming Judicial Institutions--Again

    The Search for Accountability and Transparency in PLAN COLOMBIA: Reforming Judicial Institutions--Again

    The Search for Accountability and Transparency in PLAN COLOMBIA: Reforming Judicial Institutions--Again Dr Luz E Nagle Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph, written by Professor Luz Estella Nagle, is another in the special series to emerge from the February 2001 conference on Plan Colombia that was cosponsored by the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College and The Dante B. Fascell North-South Center of the University of Miami. In it, she stresses what has been defined by President Andrés Pastrana as one of the five strategic issues included in Plan Colombia. Nevertheless, the author argues that the issue of judicial reform deserves long-term attention and a higher priority within the larger context."
    • Published On: 5/1/2001
  •  Fighting the Hobbesian Trinity in Colombia: A New Strategy for Peace

    Fighting the Hobbesian Trinity in Colombia: A New Strategy for Peace

    Fighting the Hobbesian Trinity in Colombia: A New Strategy for Peace COL Joseph R Nunez Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, one of a special series on Colombia, Colonel Joseph R. Nuñez first analyzes the intervention conundrum of Colombia. He then summarizes the reasons for the violent and anarchic situation that frustrates those wishing to make peace and expand democracy. After introducing what he calls the “Hobbesian trinity,” he then discusses alternatives to intervention and notes the complexity of the human rights challenge."
    • Published On: 4/1/2001
  •  U.S. Army and the Asia-Pacific

    U.S. Army and the Asia-Pacific

    U.S. Army and the Asia-Pacific Dr Andrew Scobell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph highlights the significant and ongoing contribution of the U.S. Army in deterring war, executing smaller-scale contingencies, and shaping the security environment. The author advocates a robust, pro-active Army presence for the foreseeable future. Such a presence will ensure the promotion and protection of U.S. national interests in the region."
    • Published On: 4/1/2001
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