Collections

  •  Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success

    Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success

    Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success Prof Frank L Jones Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "U.S. interests in Africa have expanded in the past decade beyond such traditional areas as economic development through trade and investment, democratic governance and the rule of law, and conflict prevention with an emphasis on peacekeeping and rapid response capacities. The continent is now at the center of a number of critical security issues."
    • Published On: 8/29/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation

    Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation

    Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation Dr M Chris Mason Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press The type of wars being fought since the end of World War II has changed dramatically from those fought in the first half of the 20th century and before. Wars fought between countries have dropped in number to nearly zero, while the number of wars fought inside individual countries has risen dramatically.
    • Published On: 8/17/2017
  •  The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2 Larry D Miller Colonel James M. Efaw, Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin R. Jonsson, Lieutenant Colonel Asariel Loria, Commander Mark O’Connell, Colonel Stephen E. Schemenauer Army War College Review by the US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/24/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps

    Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps

    Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps Prof John F Troxell Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/19/2017
  •  The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1 Larry D Miller Colonel Darren Huxley, COL David C. Menser, Lieutenant Colonel Carter L. Price, Lieutenant Colonel Jaren K. Price, LTC Geoffrey W. Wright Army War College Review by the US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/18/2017
  •  Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat Dr Jeffrey Record Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Why did the Axis Powers lose World War II, and what can we learn from its defeat? The Axis seemed on top of the world until 1941, when it added to its list of enemies the United States and the Soviet Union. The entry of Russia and America into the war decisively tipped the balance against Germany, Italy, and Japan. Resource-rich Russia and the United States were prepared for protracted conflict, whereas the Axis was not. From Pearl Harbor onward, it is difficult to imagine how the Axis could have avoided the fate that befell it, short of Stalin’s defection from the Allied side."
    • Published On: 7/13/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity

    Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity

    Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity Mr. Nathan P Freier Articles by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 6/9/2017
  •  Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army

    Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army

    Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army Dr Shima D Keene Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Corruption increases the level of instability and the risk of conflict by undermining the legitimacy and credibility of state institutions as well as of peacekeeping and state-building interventions by the international community, to include the U.S. Army. Post-conflict states, or states emerging from conflict, are particularly vulnerable to corruption, due to the lack of good governance infrastructures, which makes it difficult to detect, disrupt, or bring about successful prosecutions against those who are involved in activities such as bribery, extortion, false accounting, and embezzlement."
    • Published On: 6/6/2017
  •  21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field Dr Anna Simons Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Among lessons said to have been learned over the past decade and a half is that the United States should never again use force absent a coherent strategy. Yet, no matter how necessary a coherent strategy is, it will prove insufficient unless the problem of too many competing hierarchies is likewise addressed. A second complicating challenge for those in 21st-century command is churn: churn of personnel, of units, and of responsibility. Without there being a commanding general, a supreme commander, or some “one” individual placed in charge for the duration, decisive results will remain elusive."
    • Published On: 5/31/2017
Page 5 of 60