Military Change & Transformation

 
  •  Strategic Insights: Revolutionary Change Is Coming to Strategic Leadership

    Strategic Insights: Revolutionary Change Is Coming to Strategic Leadership

    Strategic Insights: Revolutionary Change Is Coming to Strategic Leadership Dr Steven Metz Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 12/19/2017
  •  Futures Seminar 2017 - The United States Army in 2035 and Beyond

    Futures Seminar 2017 - The United States Army in 2035 and Beyond

    Futures Seminar 2017 - The United States Army in 2035 and Beyond Samuel R. White, Jr. Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "In 2035-2050 the battlespace will be elongated and deepened - and hyper-connected. Engagements will occur at home station military bases through ports of debarkation to tactical assembly areas all the way to the adversary's motor pool. From space to the ocean floor; from military to non-military; from governmental to non-governmental; from state to non-state; from physical to virtual. The operational area will be wherever effects are generated - and the array of stimuli that will generate effects is staggering. The interconnected and global nature of everything will produce physical and virtual effects that have tremendous range, saturation and immediacy - along with daunting complexity and stealth."
    • Published On: 12/1/2017
  •  2017-18 Key Strategic Issues List

    2017-18 Key Strategic Issues List

    2017-18 Key Strategic Issues List COL Todd E. Key Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Today's global security environment remains volatile, uncertain, and complex. Resurgent, revanchist, and unstable states, and radical terrorist organizations continue to challenge the international order, undermine peace and stability, and threaten U.S. interests. In the face of this, the United States Army remains America's combat force of decision. If the political leaders of the United States decide to deploy its Army, the Nation's opponents know they will be defeated. This certainty is the foundation of America's deterrent capability."
    • Published On: 11/15/2017
  •  Closer Than You Think: The Implications of the Third Offset Strategy for the U.S. Army

    Closer Than You Think: The Implications of the Third Offset Strategy for the U.S. Army

    Closer Than You Think: The Implications of the Third Offset Strategy for the U.S. Army Mr Samuel R White Jr Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is moving forward with a broad set of innovation initiatives designed to effectively posture the U.S. military for the coming decades. One sub-set of initiatives, the Third Offset, is focused on leap-ahead technologies and capabilities that may offset competitor parity in critical domains."
    • Published On: 10/26/2017
  •  Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace

    Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace

    Rethinking Sovereignty in the Context of Cyberspace: The Cyber Sovereignty Workshop Series Cynthia E. Ayers "Recent successful "hacks," allegedly carried out by professionals acting on behalf of, or in concert with nation-states have heightened concerns about cyber warfare and sovereignty in the context of cyberspace. To maintain the integrity of U.S. and allied sovereign borders, it is imperative that security measures and defenses are coordinated and choreographed at the policy, strategy, and operational levels in the cyber domain, as well as in the physical world..."
    • Published On: 7/10/2017
  •  2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List

    2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List

    2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List Professor John F. Troxell Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Russia, China, North Korea, Iran, and radical violent extremist organizations that currently challenge the U.S will likely continue to do so for some time. These security challenges exist within a wider global context of rapid technological change, significant demographic shifts, an uncertain economy, and geostrategic power dynamics of historic proportions. These conditions intensify the level of uncertainty and the pace of change, and raise the potential for significant interstate conflict to higher levels than at any time since the end of the Cold War."
    • Published On: 7/1/2016
  •  Impunity: Countering Illicit Power in War and Transition

    Impunity: Countering Illicit Power in War and Transition

    Impunity: Countering Illicit Power in War and Transition Michelle Hughes, Michael Miklaucic Guides and Handbooks by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "Strategies that weaken illicit power structures and strengthen legitimate state authority are vital to national and international security. As Dr. Henry Kissinger observed, we may be “facing a period in which forces beyond the restraints of any order determine the future.” Because threats to security emanate from disorder in areas where governance and rule of law are weak, defeating terrorist, insurgent, and criminal organizations requires integrated efforts not only to attack enemy organizations, but also to strengthen institutions essential to sustainable security."
    • Published On: 5/19/2016
  •  The Changing Character of War 1775-2016

    The Changing Character of War 1775-2016

    The Changing Character of War 1775-2016 Dr Conrad C Crane, Dr Michael E Lynch, Dr James D. Scudieri Historical Research Review by US Army War College, Army Heritage and Education Center "The potential changes in the operating environment (OE) and the character of war in the next 15-20 years are unknowable and history cannot provide a predictive model or “cookbook” to anticipate future events. The last 250 years, however, have provided many examples of shifts in the character of war caused by emerging technology, political shifts, economic changes and diplomatic crises. This context may prove very useful for senior leaders. There will doubtless be technological advances in the future, and some may be “game changers.” Intellectual development is just as important as technological development..."
    • Published On: 4/1/2016
  •  2015-16 Key Strategic Issues List

    2015-16 Key Strategic Issues List

    2015-16 Key Strategic Issues List Professor John F. Troxell Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The global security environment remains volatile, uncertain and complex and the velocity of instability around the world has increased dramatically. The recently published National Military Strategy highlights the growing global disorder and increasing unpredictability. The complexity of this dynamic security environment is captured in the Army’s new operating concept, “Win in a Complex World.” The challenge that we face is clearly articulated in the Army Vision..."
    • Published On: 8/1/2015
  •  Confidence Building in Cyberspace: A Comparison of Territorial and Weapons-Based Regimes

    Confidence Building in Cyberspace: A Comparison of Territorial and Weapons-Based Regimes

    Confidence Building in Cyberspace: A Comparison of Territorial and Weapons-Based Regimes Dr Mary Manjikian Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This monograph examines two historic examples of the development of confidence-building measures (CBMs) so as to make recommendations regarding the development of CBMs for cyberspace. The first study looks at CBMs aimed at preventing the escalation of conflict in contested territories such as the Indo-Pakistan border. The second study looks at the development of a chemical weapons ban following World War I and the establishment of reporting and monitoring procedures to stem the proliferation of chemical weapons. Both cases offer lessons for cyber-based CBMs: One can borrow from territorial CBMs to establish a secure environment, or one can borrow from weapons-based CBMs to shape the development of new cyber technologies and prevent their proliferation."
    • Published On: 4/1/2015
  •  Strategic Insights: The Landpower Robot Revolution Is Coming

    Strategic Insights: The Landpower Robot Revolution Is Coming

    Strategic Insights: The Landpower Robot Revolution Is Coming Steven Metz Article by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Military technical revolutions have a distinct pattern. When new technology becomes available, it initially is used to augment existing operational methods and tactics. In Europe, for instance, the first firearms were used to give formations of pikemen more punch. On the battlefields of World War I, tanks were moveable pill boxes supporting slogging infantry attacks. Airplanes were used like old-fashioned cavalry, scouting for the infantry and artillery. Later, they supplemented infantry and artillery by strafing and bombing. Even the first atomic weapons were simply a very effective way to do the work of traditional 500 pound bombs and incendiaries..."
    • Published On: 12/10/2014
  •  Futures Seminar: The United States Army in 2025 and Beyond

    Futures Seminar: The United States Army in 2025 and Beyond

    Futures Seminar: The United States Army in 2025 and Beyond Mr Samuel R White Jr Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Academic Year 2014 (AY14) marks the inaugural year for the Futures Seminar – an elective course offered to resident students during the Term II elective period (Feb-Mar 2014) at the U.S. Army War College (USAWC). Created through a shared vision between the USAWC and the Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC), the Futures Seminar is loosely modeled on the Army After Next Project (AANP), conducted at the USAWC in the late 1990s. Through the AANP, the USAWC hoped to leverage research and writing on strategic trends, the security environment, technology and other factors which would impact the Army in 10 to 25 years."
    • Published On: 6/6/2014
  •  Op-Ed: Changing the Army's Culture of Cultural Change

    Op-Ed: Changing the Army's Culture of Cultural Change

    Op-Ed: Changing the Army's Culture of Cultural Change Leonard Wong Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In a profession as large as the U.S. Army, trying to influence the way organizational members think about specific issues can be a vexing proposition. Certainly new systems, policies, and procedures can force changes in behavior, but often what senior decisionmakers truly desire is a shift in attitudes—a culture change across the entire Army. Recent calls for Army culture change have emerged in areas as diverse as cyber security, resilience, sexual assault, leader development, language proficiency, and even energy conservation. Interestingly, the varied attempts at changing the Army’s culture over the past years seem to follow an amazingly similar template."
    • Published On: 5/16/2014
  •  Changing Minds In The Army: Why It Is So Difficult and What To Do About It

    Changing Minds In The Army: Why It Is So Difficult and What To Do About It

    Changing Minds In The Army: Why It Is So Difficult and What To Do About It Dr Stephen J Gerras, Dr Leonard Wong Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "While changing one’s mind is not something we normally associate with strategic leadership, Stephen Gerras and Leonard Wong point out that it is not only a valuable skill at the strategic level, but also a necessary capability in the current security environment of complexity and change. Unfortunately, as the authors describe, changing one’s mind does not come easy for Army senior leaders. Individual and organizational factors emerge that make the ability to change one’s mind difficult and elusive. Nevertheless, this monograph introduces a concept that all Army senior leaders should evaluate both in themselves and the Army profession."
    • Published On: 10/1/2013
  •  SOLLIMS Sampler - Lessons on Stability Operations from U.S. Army War College Students

    SOLLIMS Sampler - Lessons on Stability Operations from U.S. Army War College Students

    SOLLIMS Sampler - Lessons on Stability Operations from U.S. Army War College Students Mister David A Mosinski PKSOI SOLLIMS Sampler by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "In Academic Year 2013, U.S. Army War College students in PKSOI elective courses were given the opportunity to enter a Lesson Learned (gained from operational experience) into the SOLLIMS database. Over 80 Lessons Learned were captured, covering topics such as Governance, Security Sector Reform, Economic Stabilization, and Comprehensive Approach. The vast majority have Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Multinational (JIIM) applications."
    • Published On: 8/26/2013
Page 2 of 13