Issue Papers

 
  •  Maritime Threats Workshop

    Maritime Threats Workshop

    Maritime Threats Workshop Dr Kent H Butts, LTC Curtis W Turner, Cmdr Robert L Wohlschlegel Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The United States-Republic of the Philippines strengthened their strategic partnership when representatives of the two countries co-hosted the Maritime Threats Workshop held in Cebu, Republic of the Philippines on 26-30 July 2004, focused on promoting multilateral interoperability and cooperation on maritime and environmental issues that foster terrorism; identifying maritime and transnational threats; discussing solutions to these issues; developing maritime protection capabilities; encouraging military support to civil authority; facilitating international and interagency cooperation (to include NGO/IOs); and strengthening the bonds between the military and civilian organizations. The multilateral workshop is the fourth of a series of U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) Defense Environmental Cooperation Conference."
    • Published On: 10/15/2004
  •  A Radiological Detonation Device Explodes in the Homeland

    A Radiological Detonation Device Explodes in the Homeland

    A Radiological Detonation Device Explodes in the Homeland Prof Michael J Pasquarett, COL John A Tanzi Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The leadership of the United States has emphatically stated “it’s not a matter of if, but rather when another terrorist attack will occur.” Therefore, in the future, maybe distant or not so distant, the United States’ political and military leadership may have to face actually responding to “the unthinkable”: a successful radiological attack by terrorists within the borders of the Nation. A terror event of this magnitude makes the already challenging security environment even more daunting. This new style of attack is indeed different from past threats characterized by force-on-force conflict across borders with enemies and friends that were known and open warfare that now seems so straightforward and in comparison simple. The new security challenge is different and very complex and grows from the proliferation of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) capabilities throughout the world."
    • Published On: 10/15/2004
  •  A Nuclear Weapon Detonation in the Homeland

    A Nuclear Weapon Detonation in the Homeland

    A Nuclear Weapon Detonation in the Homeland Prof James O Kievit, LTC Jeffery A Mcnary Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Every day an already challenging security environment grows even more daunting with the continued proliferation of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) capabilities throughout the world. Each can create clandestine devices for delivery by state-sponsored or non state terrorists. Thus, in the future, perhaps the not so distant future, American political and military leadership actually may have to respond to “the unthinkable”: a successful weapon of mass destruction (WMD) attack by terrorists within the borders of the nation. With that possibility in mind, the United States Army War College (USAWC) recently conducted a focused workshop bringing together over 100 participants from local, regional, state and federal entities at the Center for Strategic Leadership on Carlisle Barracks to review contemporary plans, policies and procedures and discuss developing programs to incorporate military, and especially reserve component (RC) forces into the responses to a hypothetical CBRNE attack within the borders of the United States. Three different attack scenarios were presented – one biological, one radiological, and one nuclear. This paper addresses the workshop’s findings related to response to a nuclear weapon attack. "
    • Published On: 10/15/2004
  •  Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium

    Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium

    Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium Dr Kent H Butts, LTC Curtis W Turner Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Republic of the Philippines (RP) has undertaken a bold initiative to reform its national security architecture in order to more effectively address regional terrorist and other transnational threats. This strategic planning initiative has developed the Emerging Security Environment to 2022 document, a National Military Strategy, a National Internal Security Plan, and a Multi-Year Defense Capability Planning System (MYDCaPS). The initiative has its roots in a two-year long series of trilateral, Republic of the Philippines, Australia and United States (U.S.) Senior Leader Strategic Planning Symposia. The Australian Embassy-Manila hosted the latest event, the Trilateral Strategic Defense Capability Planning Symposium, on 13-15 July 2004."
    • Published On: 9/15/2004
  •  Environmental Security and Cooperation Workshop

    Environmental Security and Cooperation Workshop

    Environmental Security and Cooperation Workshop Dr Kent H Butts, LTC Curtis W Turner Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The United States Army in the Pacific (USARPAC), the Department of Defense (DUSD-I&E), and the United States Army War College conducted an Environmental Security Cooperation Workshop in Bangkok, Thailand on July 19-22, 2004, focused on multilateral cooperation in developing regional approaches to building governmental legitimacy and creating conditions inhospitable to terrorism. The workshop was a follow-on activity from the Addressing Transnational Threats in Southeast Asia: Environmental Security and Counter Terrorism Conference held in Manila, Republic of the Philippines (RP) in December of 2003. The objectives of the Manila conference were to promote multilateral defense and counter terrorism cooperation, to identify the best practices for prevention, mitigation, and consequence management in response to man-made and natural disasters that threaten governmental legitimacy."
    • Published On: 9/15/2004
  •  Southeast Asia Subject Matter Expert Exchange

    Southeast Asia Subject Matter Expert Exchange

    Southeast Asia Subject Matter Expert Exchange LTC Curtis W Turner, Prof Bert B Tussing, Dr Richard L Winslow Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "From 6-19 June 2004, a team composed of staff members from the United States Army War College’s Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) and the National Defense University traveled to Indonesia and Malaysia in support of the Pacific Command’s Subject Matter Exchange Program. This team consisted of Dr. Richard Winslow, Professor Bert Tussing and Lieutenant Colonel Curtis Turner of CSL; and Dr. Greg Foster of the National Defense University’s Industrial College of the Armed Forces."
    • Published On: 8/31/2004
  •  Iraq 2003-4 and Mesopotamia 1914-18: A Comparative Analysis in Ends and Means

    Iraq 2003-4 and Mesopotamia 1914-18: A Comparative Analysis in Ends and Means

    Iraq 2003-4 and Mesopotamia 1914-18: A Comparative Analysis in Ends and Means Dr James D. Scudieri Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "This paper is a comparative analysis of the linkage between strategic ends with operational ways and means of the current operation in Iraq in 2003-4 and the British campaign in Mesopotamia in 1914-18. The two campaigns took place literally over the same ground. The United States now and Great Britain then both faced significant challenges to project and maintain military power in this part of the world. Moreover, the two great powers inherited daunting civil-military requirements in country. This study has restricted research to unclassified sources on Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Open-source research for an ongoing campaign greatly complicated attainment of a comprehensive understanding of the linkage between ends, ways, and means, but such an option facilitated frank debate with wider dissemination."
    • Published On: 8/15/2004
  •  Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism

    Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism

    Observing al Qaeda Through the Lens of Complexity Theory: Recommendations for the National Strategy to Defeat Terrorism LTC Michael F Beech Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The defeat of al Qaeda and the global network of Islamic terrorist organizations often appear no more certain today than it did two years ago. Since 9/11 the world has witnessed terrorist attacks against US interests and its allies in seven different countries. Al Qaeda may have lost Afghanistan as a safe haven, but it has gained a new front by conducting operations against US and coalition forces in Iraq. Despite US military successes, al Qaeda retains a demonstrated ability to recruit and conduct operations globally as Osama bin Laden and many of his most experienced inner circle and associates are still at large. Although there has yet to be another devastating attack on the US homeland, it is important to remember that the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon took over three years of planning and preparation. The lack of a subsequent catastrophic attack in the US since 9/11 is not in itself proof of a successful strategy against terrorism. Despite the efforts of two years of military operations against al Qaeda, the CIA pronounced that al Qaeda still represents the single greatest risk to US national security. This paradox calls into question the very frameworks, models and tools that US strategic leaders use to develop counter terrorism policy and strategy."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Leveraging the Media: The Embedded Media Program in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Leveraging the Media: The Embedded Media Program in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Leveraging the Media: The Embedded Media Program in Operation Iraqi Freedom Col Glenn Starnes Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Margaret Belknap writing in Parameters in 2002 commented, “The fourth estate [the media] offers a superb mechanism for strategic leaders and warfighters to transmit operational objectives and goals, as well as to reinforce policy objectives.” Ms Belknap stated that strategic leaders must be proactive in leveraging the media in order to inform audiences concerning objectives and end-states. She warned that if the military failed to leverage the media, they risked having the graphic images of war shown to the world and the American people in a distorted manner. Inaccurate or deceitful reporting of military actions could drastically affect the will and support of the American people, which is the strategic center of gravity for the United States (US). Loss of public support for a war could also affect the decision-making process at the strategic level. Essentially, Ms Belknap echoed the sentiment of many others who recommend the military cease holding the press at arm’s length. Instead, the military should embrace the press and leverage the media’s technology and worldwide reach to further strategic goals."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Incorporation of Indigenous Forces in Major Theater War: Advantages, Risks and Considerations

    Incorporation of Indigenous Forces in Major Theater War: Advantages, Risks and Considerations

    Incorporation of Indigenous Forces in Major Theater War: Advantages, Risks and Considerations Ms Priscilla Sellers Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The planning of nearly all military campaigns has included, at least in part, the consideration of the participation of friendly indigenous forces or assets. From the North African Campaign (Operation Torch) to Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the number and specific tactical responsibilities of the indigenous assets in theater have varied but generally have continued to increase. Just as the responsibilities of the indigenous force have continued to change over time, so have the responsibilities incumbent upon the U.S. military establishment in determining the appropriate integration and handling of this local asset, based upon respective inherent factors. "
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Effectiveness of Stability Operations During the Initial Implementation of the Transition Phase for Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Effectiveness of Stability Operations During the Initial Implementation of the Transition Phase for Operation Iraqi Freedom

    Effectiveness of Stability Operations During the Initial Implementation of the Transition Phase for Operation Iraqi Freedom COL Paul F Dicker Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The United States’ strategic goal at the onset of the armed conflict in Iraq was to topple Saddam Hussein’s regime and to create a free, unified, and democratic Iraq. The necessity of having a unified Iraq derives from its strategic location in the Middle East and from U.S. commitments to other Middle East countries supporting the war effort, including Saudi Arabia and Jordan. In order to achieve this strategic goal, the coalition, led by the U.S. military, would need to first insure a secure and stable environment."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Transformational Leadership in Wartime

    Transformational Leadership in Wartime

    Transformational Leadership in Wartime LTC Steven J Eden Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Few men are vouchsafed the command of armies; fewer still face the task of rebuilding defeated armies in wartime, and of these only a handful have been successful. Three who assumed command in the midst of defeat were George McClellan, arriving in Washington, D.C., to take over the Army of the Potomac as it licked its wounds after Bull Run; William Slim, coming to Burma as the Japanese drove the British out of Rangoon; and Matthew Ridgway, appointed to lead an Eighth Army reeling back before the Chinese pouring over the Yalu River. "
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization

    Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization

    Swiftly Defeat The Efforts: Then What? The "New American Way Of War" And Transitioning Decisive Combat To Post Conflict Stabilization LTC John D Nelson Student Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Since the end of the first Gulf War in Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm the United States has fought in three decisive operations: Operation Allied Force in Kosovo, Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, and Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq. The principles of Rapid Decisive Operations influenced the pattern and conduct of operations in all three conflicts. The success in the major combat operations of Operation Iraqi Freedom, led Max Boot, to call this a New American Way of War."
    • Published On: 7/15/2004
  •  The 'Global ' Homeland: International Perspectives on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security

    The 'Global ' Homeland: International Perspectives on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security

    The 'Global ' Homeland: International Perspectives on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security Prof Bert B Tussing Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Given the immediacy in both time and space of the terrorist threat, it is easy to become overly focused on the issue as regards only the United States and the U.S. homeland. Yet, we are not in this alone. Other nations, international organizations such as NATO and the European Union, and transnational law enforcement agencies such as Europol and Interpol are deeply committed to the counterterror effort. Seeing the Global War on Terror from their perspective provides both greater insight and greater opportunities for crushing the enemies of civilized peoples throughout the world."
    • Published On: 5/15/2004
  •  Collins Center Senior Symposium: Examining Critical Infrastructure Protection Strategies

    Collins Center Senior Symposium: Examining Critical Infrastructure Protection Strategies

    Collins Center Senior Symposium: Examining Critical Infrastructure Protection Strategies Dr Kent H Butts, LTC John C Traylor, Prof Bert B Tussing Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Among the leading concerns surrounding Homeland Security in the United States is Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP). Identifying, prioritizing, and providing for the protection of infrastructure so vital to the United States that its incapacity or destruction “would have a debilitating impact on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination of those matters” is one of the most compelling issues facing the Department of Homeland Security, its interagency partners, state and local governments, and the private sector."
    • Published On: 5/15/2004
Page 7 of 16