Op-Eds

 
  •  Russia Challenges the Obama Administration

    Russia Challenges the Obama Administration

    Russia Challenges the Obama Administration Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Moscow threw down the gauntlet to Barack Obama the day after he became president-elect. Russia threatens that unless the United States withdraws its 10 missile defense networks from Poland and the Czech Republic, it will install Iskander cruise missiles (which can be conventional or nuclear) in Kaliningrad on Poland’s borders and jam the radars in the Czech Republic. Moscow makes several assertions to justify its threat..."
    • Published On: 12/1/2008
  •  Living Perilously in a Bubble

    Living Perilously in a Bubble

    Living Perilously in a Bubble Dr Leonard Wong Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For the past decade, we have become accustomed to hearing the sound of bursting bubbles. During the late 1990s, it was the giddy days of the dotcom bubble. Internet-based companies gained rock star popularity as stock prices soared, venture capital flowed freely, and traditional blue-chip companies scurried to mimic the dotcoms who gained success by bypassing standard business models."
    • Published On: 11/1/2008
  •  Dueling Natures

    Dueling Natures

    Dueling Natures Dr Antulio J Echevarria II Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Election cycles make for interesting times. For one thing, they prompt debates among defense analysts and other experts over current programs, the balance (or lack thereof) among ends, ways, and means, as well as examinations of some of the basic assumptions underpinning our theories and concepts of war. One debate in particular—that regarding the nature of war—is worth reviewing because its implications are far-reaching."
    • Published On: 10/1/2008
  •  The View from There

    The View from There

    The View from There Dr Sherifa D Zuhur Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "A new U.S. President faces huge challenges in the Middle East. Unfortunately, he will not begin with a clean slate. Instead, some uncomfortable fabric has already been cut to fit various policy situations, and a deft tailor is needed to reconsider, redesign, and refit this ghastly, bulky, and multilayered garment we call a Middle East “policy” with an ear to objections from within the region. Granted, U.S. policy goals differ from those of Middle Eastern nation-states and national entities, like the Palestinians, who have not yet achieved their own states."
    • Published On: 9/1/2008
  •  Real Change or Retrenchment?

    Real Change or Retrenchment?

    Real Change or Retrenchment? Dr Douglas V Johnson II Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "It is frequently asserted in our 0930 daily kaffe klatsch that as soon as the insurgency phenomenon in Iraq and Afghanistan is suppressed, the Army reflexively will return to its fixation on the kinetic approach to major combat. It is also popular to hold up the post-Vietnam era as a demonstration of that phenomenon with occasional references to similar reactions following the suppression of the Philippine Insurrection. These facile analyses are adduced to support the American Army’s distaste for counterinsurgency work."
    • Published On: 8/1/2008
  •  Expand the U.S. Military? Not So Fast

    Expand the U.S. Military? Not So Fast

    Expand the U.S. Military? Not So Fast Dr Steven Metz Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Today there is bipartisan support for increasing the size of the U.S. military, particularly the land forces. While conservatives like Frederick Kagan and Thomas Donnelly have provided the most detailed rationale, even liberals like Barack Obama agree. At first glance, this seems like a common sense step to alleviate the stress on the military and prepare for future security challenges. But is it? When the rationale for expansion is carefully dissected, its desirability is not so clear."
    • Published On: 7/1/2008
  •  Chavez - The Beginning of the End

    Chavez - The Beginning of the End

    Chavez - The Beginning of the End Dr Alex Crowther Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, is on the way into the history books. Although he is still positioned to create problems for the Venezuelan people, the Colombians, and others throughout the Western Hemisphere that he chooses to victimize, he is no longer on the ascent."
    • Published On: 6/1/2008
  •  The Second Berlin Wall

    The Second Berlin Wall

    The Second Berlin Wall LTC Raymond A Millen Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The latest contretemps in NATO regarding burden sharing in Afghanistan has the distinguishing feature of being altogether pedestrian. European reluctance to contribute more troops and funding to Afghanistan has less to do with disagreements over strategy than it does with a pattern of behavior stemming back to the birth of the Alliance."
    • Published On: 5/1/2008
  •  The Strategy Deficit

    The Strategy Deficit

    The Strategy Deficit Mr Nathan P Freier Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "An honest survey of post-Cold War national security policy exhibits a dangerous strategy deficit. The word “strategy” is overused. The concept, too, is poorly applied. It is many things to contemporary policymakers except, well—strategy. In the current environment, strategic communications and strategy have become synonymous. Strategic communications is the carefully crafted but overly general and widely consumable articulation of key political messages—“assure, deter, dissuade, defeat”; “as they stand up, we’ll stand down”; “clear, hold, build”; “phased strategic redeployment”; etc, etc, etc..."
    • Published On: 3/20/2008
  •  After Fidel, The Deluge?

    After Fidel, The Deluge?

    After Fidel, The Deluge? Dr Alex Crowther Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "As Louis XV allegedly said, “Apres moi, le deluge.” Certainly people have thought that Cuba after Fidel would be the same. How would a Cuban state that revolves around him survive his departure? How would a government where no decision is too small for his attention function? How would the generations who have known no one other than the “Maximo Lider” handle the change? Luckily for the Cuban government, the answer is—there will be almost no change in the near future. No deluge, just a drizzle."
    • Published On: 3/1/2008
  •  Deterrence, Missile Defense, and Collateral Damage in the Iranian-Israeli Strategic Relationship

    Deterrence, Missile Defense, and Collateral Damage in the Iranian-Israeli Strategic Relationship

    Deterrence, Missile Defense, and Collateral Damage in the Iranian-Israeli Strategic Relationship Dr W Andrew Terrill Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "One of the central concerns of U.S. strategic analysts examining the Middle East is the danger that Iran may develop a nuclear weapons capability which it could use to threaten the security of other regional states. These fears exist despite the recent declassification of a 2007 National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) “key judgments” summary suggesting that the Iranian nuclear weapons development program was frozen in 2003."
    • Published On: 2/1/2008
  •  Intrepidity . . . And Character Development within the Army Profession

    Intrepidity . . . And Character Development within the Army Profession

    Intrepidity . . . And Character Development within the Army Profession Dr Don M Snider Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "How many Army soldiers, particularly Leaders, who just read the title of this opinion piece, knew the meaning of the first word; how many brought to their reading an accurate understanding of the term? More importantly, how many Army Leaders could place a true meaning of the word into the context of the Army as a unique profession producing, for the security of the American people, fighting forces for effective land combat? Where does intrepidity fit in what the Army produces and how does the profession develop such a thing?"
    • Published On: 1/1/2008
  •  Is it Time to Mandate Volunteerism?

    Is it Time to Mandate Volunteerism?

    Is it Time to Mandate Volunteerism? Dr Leonard Wong Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This October, the U.S. Army successfully met its annual recruiting goal by bringing in 80,000 new soldiers for fiscal year 2007. This accomplishment, however, necessitated the offering of a $20,000 bonus to ship out immediately, depleted the delayed-entry pool of next year’s recruits to make this year’s mission, and required the relaxing of standards in the areas of high school graduation, criminal background, and mental aptitude. The next few years will be even more of a challenge as the Army increases its strength by 28,000 soldiers by 2010."
    • Published On: 12/1/2007
  •  Working and Playing Well with Others: A Strategy-Policy Mismatch in Export Controls

    Working and Playing Well with Others: A Strategy-Policy Mismatch in Export Controls

    Working and Playing Well with Others: A Strategy-Policy Mismatch in Export Controls LTC Charles H Wilson Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Reading through the strategic guidance that our Nation has been operating under for a number of years, you can find a basic, common concept that I like to refer to as “work and play well with others.” It is derived from statements like “partnerships continue to be the principle source of our strength”1 and “the reform of NATO structures, capabilities and procedures must be accelerated.”2 Those are just two examples of the many similar references that are imbedded throughout documents from the National Security Strategy to CJCS-approved military strategies. The concept is also routinely reflected in guidance at lower levels of government, such as that developed by our Combatant Commanders."
    • Published On: 11/1/2007
  •  The Summit: Mirage or Milestone?

    The Summit: Mirage or Milestone?

    The Summit: Mirage or Milestone? Dr Sherifa D Zuhur Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Considering Senator George Mitchell’s remarks on the negotiations that ended the conflict in Northern Ireland, I can only wonder if they would have succeeded if matters were left to fester as in the Israeli-Palestinian issue. Or in the national dispute in Lebanon. Or Iraq. Without the energy devoted by a U.S. President, the 2 years devoted to negotiations on Northern Ireland, and the leaders’ refusal to be dissuaded by violence, could Mitchell have succeeded? Had he and others not been deeply committed to the notion that the people of Northern Ireland should choose their own future, would they have prevailed?"
    • Published On: 10/1/2007
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