Western Hemisphere

 
  •  Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, Bolivarian Socialism, and Asymmetric Warfare

    Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, Bolivarian Socialism, and Asymmetric Warfare

    Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, Bolivarian Socialism, and Asymmetric Warfare Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph comes at a time when the U.S. and Venezuelan governments are intensifying an ongoing series of acrimonious charges and countercharges. Each country has argued repeatedly that the other is engaged in a political-economic-military struggle for Western Hemisphere hegemony. On a more personal level, the United States maintains that President Hugo Chávez of Venezuela is playing a destabilizing role in the region, and is compromising the quality of democracy and the exercise of power in Venezuela and other parts of the Americas. Chávez rebuts that the only destabilizing factor in the hemisphere is President George W. Bush, and that democracy and power long since have been perverted by American capitalists and local elites for their own purposes. And the U.S.-Venezuelan verbal sparing match continues unabated."
    • Published On: 10/1/2005
  •  Sustainability of Colombian Military/Strategic Support for "Democratic Security"

    Sustainability of Colombian Military/Strategic Support for "Democratic Security"

    Sustainability of Colombian Military/Strategic Support for "Democratic Security" Dr Thomas A Marks Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "A sea-change has occurred in troubled Colombia, as detailed in this monograph. For the first time in 40 years, cautious optimism pervades discussions of Bogota’s seemingly intractable situation. Drugs, terrorism, and insurgency continue in their explosive mix, but the current government of President Alvaro Uribe has fashioned a counterinsurgency approach that holds the strategic initiative and has a chance of negating a long-standing security threat to the state."
    • Published On: 7/1/2005
  •  The Strategic Implications of the Rise of Populism in Europe and South America

    The Strategic Implications of the Rise of Populism in Europe and South America

    The Strategic Implications of the Rise of Populism in Europe and South America Dr Steve C Ropp Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Populism has received very little attention from military planners. This is understandable. As a political phenomenon, it is viewed as somewhat removed from security concerns and hence as more legitimately within the purview of those members of the U.S. policy community who deal with political issues. Furthermore, as a dynamic, unstable, and ephemeral phenomenon within seemingly stable representative democracies, it is hard to “see” and hence to study. This makes trend extrapolation regarding the growth of populist movements much more difficult than for other future security challenges such as terrorism or unconventional war."
    • Published On: 6/1/2005
  •  U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America

    U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America

    U.S. National Security Implications of Chinese Involvement in Latin America Dr R Evan Ellis Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Dr. Evan Ellis seeks to do several things. He documents and examines the character of the new and increasing Chinese engagement in the Western Hemisphere. He then takes the analysis a step further by examining some of the potential dynamics of the Chinese engagement and its consequences for the long-term security interests of the United States. Dr. Ellis argues that China is both a significant competitor, and a potential partner of the United States in the region. Although he argues that China increasingly will vie with the United States for the hemisphere’s resources and political allegiances, he also notes that China’s growing dependence on its trade and investment in Latin America will give it security and stability interests that coincide with those of the United States."
    • Published On: 6/1/2005
  •  The International Community and Haiti: A Proposal for Cooperative Sovereignty

    The International Community and Haiti: A Proposal for Cooperative Sovereignty

    The International Community and Haiti: A Proposal for Cooperative Sovereignty Dr Gabriel Marcella Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "An earlier version of this commentary appeared in the Miami Herald (January 2, 2005). The reaction to that piece has been divided between approval and downright rejection. The rejection was perhaps due to the novelty of the proposal, but more probably it was the implication that Haitians, heirs to a proud legacy of liberation from the shackles of slavery, could not take care of their own affairs. Pragmatic realism, however, informs us that the value at stake here is national survival, and the issues central to the Haiti dilemma have consequences far beyond the borders of that long-suffering society."
    • Published On: 5/1/2005
  •  U.S. Southern Command Environmental Security Training Workshop

    U.S. Southern Command Environmental Security Training Workshop

    U.S. Southern Command Environmental Security Training Workshop Dr Kent H Butts, COL Jeffrey C Reynolds, Mr Alex Sonski Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) Theater Security Cooperation Program for Central America reached a new level of success with the completion of the Environmental Security Training Workshop in Alajuela, Costa Rica. The seven-day conference graduated 30 military, police, and civilian agency professionals from seven Central American countries in a ceremony attended by regional defense and environmental ministers. This “train the trainer” workshop is the culmination of a nearly decade-long SOUTHCOM, Department of Defense (DOD), and U.S. Army War College Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) Environmental Security Program."
    • Published On: 3/15/2005
  •  The Return of the Latin American Left

    The Return of the Latin American Left

    The Return of the Latin American Left Dr Alex Crowther Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Latin America watchers decry the rise of the political left in the region, citing its animosity towards both the United States and globalization. According to this point of view, the left is rising and its influence will be detrimental to hemispheric economic and political development."
    • Published On: 3/1/2005
  •  Shadows of Things Past and Images of the Future: Lessons for the Insurgencies in Our Midst

    Shadows of Things Past and Images of the Future: Lessons for the Insurgencies in Our Midst

    Shadows of Things Past and Images of the Future: Lessons for the Insurgencies in Our Midst Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph begins with a short discussion of contemporary insurgency. It argues that in studying terror war, guerrilla war, or any other common term for insurgency war, we find these expressions mischaracterize the activities of armed groups that are attempting to gain political control of a state. These organizations are engaged in a highly complex political act--political war. Given that this type of conflict is likely to challenge U.S. and other global leadership over the next several years, it is important to understand that the final results of insurgency or counterinsurgency are never determined by arms alone. Rather, the results depend on winning the political support of the people."
    • Published On: 11/1/2004
  •  Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba

    Uncomfortable Questions Regarding the inevitable Succession of Power in Cuba Dr Max G Manwaring Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Four uncomfortable questions arise, even in circumspect circles, regarding the possible succession of power in Cuba. First, assuming the nearly 80-year old Fidel Castro is mortal, 'Who will succeed him when he dies?' Second, 'What role will the Cuban armed forces play in the transition process?' Third, 'What could happen to disrupt that process?' And, finally, 'Will the United States respond to the event in an ad hoc manner, or will a plan be in place to help ensure U.S. interests?' "
    • Published On: 9/1/2004
  •  Civil-Security Forces Environmental Cooperation in Central America and the Caribbean

    Civil-Security Forces Environmental Cooperation in Central America and the Caribbean

    Civil-Security Forces Environmental Cooperation in Central America and the Caribbean Arthur L Bradshaw, Doctor Kent H Butts, Earl Green, John B Wheatley Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "This conference is the fourth in a series of conferences sponsored by the U.S. Southern Command in Central America. As such, it built upon the relationships and programs initiated in earlier conferences. The purpose of these conferences is to support three growing realizations: that the protection of the environment is critical to the sustainable development of the entire region, which is, in turn, critical to regional stability; that environmental issues are best dealt with on a regional basis; and that military and security forces have a vital role in the process of resolving environmental issues."
    • Published On: 7/28/2004
  •  U.S. Security Strategies: Trade Policy Implications for Latin America

    U.S. Security Strategies: Trade Policy Implications for Latin America

    U.S. Security Strategies: Trade Policy Implications for Latin America Dr Max G Manwaring Colloquium Briefs by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, Latin American and Caribbean Center, Florida International University "The Summit of the Americas Center and Latin American and Caribbean Center of Florida International University, and the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College held the first of a series of mini-conferences dealing with security issues in the Western Hemisphere in Miami, Florida, on February 26, 2004."
    • Published On: 4/14/2004
  •  Security in the Americas: Neither Evolution nor Devolution--Impasse

    Security in the Americas: Neither Evolution nor Devolution--Impasse

    Security in the Americas: Neither Evolution nor Devolution--Impasse Dr Max G Manwaring Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This monograph comes at a time of promise for greater economic integration between the United States and Latin America, but also one of profound concern about the deteriorating security situation in several countries in the region. Importantly, the benefits of stability, economic growth, and democracy depend on effective national sovereignty and security. These realities are gaining credence as we grow to understand that Colombia is a paradigm of the failing state, and that has enormous implications for the well-being of the Western Hemisphere. Yet, no consensus on the threat and how to deal with it has emerged. As a consequence, hemispheric security cooperation is at an impasse."
    • Published On: 3/1/2004
  •  Assisting Professional Militaries in Latin America, National Security Strategy Development Workshop, La Paz, Bolivia

    Assisting Professional Militaries in Latin America, National Security Strategy Development Workshop, La Paz, Bolivia

    Assisting Professional Militaries in Latin America, National Security Strategy Development Workshop, La Paz, Bolivia Prof Bernard F Griffard, Mr Todd M Wheeler Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "Professionalization of their nation’s military establishment is a challenge for some Latin American democracies because of the historical baggage carried by their armed forces. The populations of the countries concerned are often suspicious of providing these former repressive organizations with modern “equipment and techniques”. However, the reality is, that the region’s military organizations existing with less than adequate training and professional standards as well as operating in an under resourced environment are susceptible to corruption and politicization, and in that way pose a threat to further democratic development. "
    • Published On: 10/15/2003
  •  Building Regional Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Issues and Recommendations

    Building Regional Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Issues and Recommendations

    Building Regional Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Issues and Recommendations COL Wendy Fontela, Dr Mary Grizzard, Dr Max G Manwaring, Mr Dennis M Rempe Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Today’s Western Hemisphere strategic environment is unique. In stark contrast to many other parts of the world, countries in the Western Hemisphere are not threatened militarily by their neighbors. Twenty-five years ago, the vast majority of the governments in Latin America and the Caribbean were under either communist or autocratic rule. Today, every country in the hemisphere except one is a democracy. Democracy is the goal and the accepted model for government in the Western Hemisphere. This is significant because democracies tend to look out for the welfare of their people, seek positive relations with their neighbors, and, most importantly, do not make war against each other."
    • Published On: 10/1/2003
  •  Perspectives from Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia: Hemispheric Security

    Perspectives from Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia: Hemispheric Security

    Perspectives from Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia: Hemispheric Security Dr Luiz Bitencourt, AMB Pedro Villagra Delgado, Maj Gen Henry Medina Uribe Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Return to democratic rule in the Southern Hemisphere since the early 1980s had many positive effects. Among them, that the principles espoused domestically by all of our societies started to be reflected in our foreign policies, particularly towards the other countries of the region. That produced a positive synergy to promote the values we shared."
    • Published On: 7/1/2003
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