Collections

  •  Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 2

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 2

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 2 Mister Robert C Browne Peace and Stability Journal by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "The Association of the United States Army (AUSA) hosted a roundtable discussion at the AUSA Conference and Event Center on September 12th 2016 on ‘Peace and Stability: Operating in a Complex World’. The event opening with a key note address on the current status of Peace and Stability Operations, which was then followed by two panels addressing pertinent issues and challenges for the Peace and Stability Operations (PSO) community in achieving U.S National objectives."
    • Published On: 10/12/2017
  •  A Typology of Arguments about Drone Ethics

    A Typology of Arguments about Drone Ethics

    A Typology of Arguments about Drone Ethics Dr Mary Manjikian Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In recent years, international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have described U.S.-led drone strikes in Pakistan, Syria, Afghanistan, and elsewhere as atrocities and even war crimes. Both the International Committee of the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch have asked whether the United States is violating the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC), with Human Rights Watch suggesting that the United States should be prosecuted for its actions. At the same time, the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRAC) has called for greater regulation of what they term 'killer robots.' "
    • Published On: 10/10/2017
  •  Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success

    Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success

    Building Partner Capacity in Africa: Keys to Success Prof Frank L Jones Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "U.S. interests in Africa have expanded in the past decade beyond such traditional areas as economic development through trade and investment, democratic governance and the rule of law, and conflict prevention with an emphasis on peacekeeping and rapid response capacities. The continent is now at the center of a number of critical security issues."
    • Published On: 8/29/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation

    Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation

    Strategic Insights: Lost in Translation Dr M Chris Mason Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press The type of wars being fought since the end of World War II has changed dramatically from those fought in the first half of the 20th century and before. Wars fought between countries have dropped in number to nearly zero, while the number of wars fought inside individual countries has risen dramatically.
    • Published On: 8/17/2017
  •  The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 2 Larry D Miller Colonel James M. Efaw, Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin R. Jonsson, Lieutenant Colonel Asariel Loria, Commander Mark O’Connell, Colonel Stephen E. Schemenauer Army War College Review by the US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/24/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps

    Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps

    Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps Prof John F Troxell Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/19/2017
  •  The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1

    The Army War College Review Vol. 3 No. 1 Larry D Miller Colonel Darren Huxley, COL David C. Menser, Lieutenant Colonel Carter L. Price, Lieutenant Colonel Jaren K. Price, LTC Geoffrey W. Wright Army War College Review by the US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 7/18/2017
  •  Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat

    Ends, Means, Ideology, and Pride: Why the Axis Lost and What We Can Learn from Its Defeat Dr Jeffrey Record Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Why did the Axis Powers lose World War II, and what can we learn from its defeat? The Axis seemed on top of the world until 1941, when it added to its list of enemies the United States and the Soviet Union. The entry of Russia and America into the war decisively tipped the balance against Germany, Italy, and Japan. Resource-rich Russia and the United States were prepared for protracted conflict, whereas the Axis was not. From Pearl Harbor onward, it is difficult to imagine how the Axis could have avoided the fate that befell it, short of Stalin’s defection from the Allied side."
    • Published On: 7/13/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity

    Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity

    Strategic Insights: Speed Kills—Enter an Age of Unbridled Hyperconnectivity Mr. Nathan P Freier Articles by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 6/9/2017
  •  Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army

    Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army

    Corruption, Legitimacy, and Stability: Implications for the U.S. Army Dr Shima D Keene Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Corruption increases the level of instability and the risk of conflict by undermining the legitimacy and credibility of state institutions as well as of peacekeeping and state-building interventions by the international community, to include the U.S. Army. Post-conflict states, or states emerging from conflict, are particularly vulnerable to corruption, due to the lack of good governance infrastructures, which makes it difficult to detect, disrupt, or bring about successful prosecutions against those who are involved in activities such as bribery, extortion, false accounting, and embezzlement."
    • Published On: 6/6/2017
  •  21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field

    21st-Century Challenges of Command: A View from the Field Dr Anna Simons Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Among lessons said to have been learned over the past decade and a half is that the United States should never again use force absent a coherent strategy. Yet, no matter how necessary a coherent strategy is, it will prove insufficient unless the problem of too many competing hierarchies is likewise addressed. A second complicating challenge for those in 21st-century command is churn: churn of personnel, of units, and of responsibility. Without there being a commanding general, a supreme commander, or some “one” individual placed in charge for the duration, decisive results will remain elusive."
    • Published On: 5/31/2017
  •  The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy

    The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy

    The Turning Point for Russian Foreign Policy Mr Keir Giles Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "This Letort Paper examines the background to Russia’s use of military force in Ukraine in 2014 and Syria in 2015, and investigates the roots of Russia’s new assertiveness and willingness to resort to direct military action to resolve foreign policy challenges. This Letort Paper identifies two long-standing trends that led to this increased willingness: first, a greater and more urgent perception of threat, whether real or imagined, to Russia’s own security; and second, a recognition that Russia itself had regained sufficient strength, military and otherwise, to assert itself and counter this threat."
    • Published On: 5/25/2017
  •  Strategic Insights: Caribbean Security Issues

    Strategic Insights: Caribbean Security Issues

    Strategic Insights: Caribbean Security Issues R. Evan Ellis Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Outside of military, law enforcement, and some academic circles, security issues are rarely part of the discourse about the Caribbean. Yet, during the Cold War, the region’s contiguity with the United States made its largest island, Cuba, the focal point of the world’s closest publicly known approximation to nuclear war. Today, the Caribbean is at peace and continues to be a strategically important region to the United States and its geopolitical rivals, transnational criminal organizations, and those who live there. Currently, the security environment of the Caribbean is subject to multiple interacting stresses, influences, and potentially transformative events posing significant consequences for the United States and the region."
    • Published On: 5/16/2017
  •  Social Media—The Vital Ground: Can We Hold It?

    Social Media—The Vital Ground: Can We Hold It?

    Social Media—The Vital Ground: Can We Hold It? Dr Steve Tatham, Mr. Ian Tunnicliffe Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "In this timely and realistic examination of social media, two world-class British experts examine exactly, in the defense context, what social media is and what it should and should not be used for in the future..."
    • Published On: 4/21/2017
  •  Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 1

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 1

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 1 Mister Robert C Browne Peace and Stability Journal by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "North Korea’s hereditary rulers have been on “death watch” for decades, with many pundits regularly predicting the demise of the “Kim Family Regime.” Recent collapse scenarios are based on two potentially inter-related events: first, the sudden death of Kim Jong-un, the 32-year-old Supreme Leader (so far in reasonably good health but without a male heir) and second, the emergence of alternative power centers either within the secretive Kim family clan itself or among key security organizations. In turn, these power elites ultimately clash and break up the brittle, centralized regime."
    • Published On: 4/21/2017
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