Collections

  •  Strategic Insights: The Russian Intervention and the Internal Dynamics of Syria

    Strategic Insights: The Russian Intervention and the Internal Dynamics of Syria

    Strategic Insights: The Russian Intervention and the Internal Dynamics of Syria W. Andrew Terrill Article by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The Syrian civil war began in March 2011 and has claimed nearly 250,000 lives so far. After over 4 years of internal fighting, the Kremlin has decided to expand its role in this conflict by moving combat aircraft and some ground troops to Syria to support the Bashar al-Assad government. These actions seem like a clear prelude to a direct Russian combat role, although the scope of such an effort is not yet clear. It has started with a limited number of air strikes against the opposition forces fighting Assad..."
    • Published On: 10/1/2015
  •  Strategic Insights: Economic Power: Time to Double Down

    Strategic Insights: Economic Power: Time to Double Down

    Strategic Insights: Economic Power: Time to Double Down John F. Troxell Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "A recent editorial in The New York Times asked the question, “Who threatens America most?” It proceeded to compare recent pronouncements by incoming senior military leaders, the President, the FBI director, and finally the Director of National Intelligence. The major candidates included the usual nation states (Russia, North Korea, and China), a few nonstate terrorist organizations (ISIS and al-Qaeda), and a couple of unattributed capabilities (weapons of mass destruction and cyberattacks). The editorial concluded with the lament: 'If officials cannot agree on what the most pressing threats are, how can they develop the right strategies and properly allocate resources?' "
    • Published On: 9/29/2015
  •  SOLLIMS Sampler – Foreign Humanitarian Assistance

    SOLLIMS Sampler – Foreign Humanitarian Assistance

    SOLLIMS Sampler – Foreign Humanitarian Assistance Mister David A Mosinski PKSOI SOLLIMS Sampler by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "Foreign Humanitarian Assistance operations typically involve a wide array of participants – US Government civilian and military organizations, multinational partners, nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental actors, and host nation government authorities. Their various contributions can be vital for saving lives and relieving/reducing human suffering within an affected host nation."
    • Published On: 9/24/2015
  •  Strategic Insights: The Will To Fight

    Strategic Insights: The Will To Fight

    Strategic Insights: The Will To Fight M. Chris Mason Article by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Events on world battlefields over the past two years should give the U.S. Army pause to reconsider the entire Foreign Internal Defense (FID) mission. The seemingly unarguable axiom that "good training makes good soldiers" has been proven to be not always true. Good training does not always make good soldiers. If the definition of a good soldier is "a member of the armed forces who stands and fights for his or her country," then a good deal of money has been spent in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere without measurable and sustainable success. More than a third of all Afghan defense forces trained with U.S. taxpayer money desert in Afghanistan each year, and in Iraq they simply disappear."
    • Published On: 9/11/2015
  •  United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Maritime Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Maritime Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Maritime Manual United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Manual by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, United Nations This Manual describes the United Nations (UN) Maritime Task Force, focusing on maritime support to a UN Mission and Force Headquarters. Always scalable in size, modular in function and Mission-tailored, the UN Maritime Task Force’s size and composition depend on the size, composition and requirements of the UN Mission it supports and the physical characteristics of the Mission area. In UN Maritime Task Force operations, a common understanding of terms, standards and procedures is crucial to Mission success. Many maritime nations are already generally familiar with internationally accepted standards and procedures, but may not be familiar with the more specific requirements to operate with one another as part of a UN Maritime Task Force. This manual is designed to meet that need."
    • Published On: 9/1/2015
  •  United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Engineers Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Engineers Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Engineers Manual United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Manual by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, United Nations "This Manual describes the United Nations (UN) Military Engineer Unit, focusing on Military Engineer support to a UN Mission and Force Headquarters. Always scalable in size, modular in function and Mission-tailored, the UN Military Engineer Unit’s size and composition depend on the size, composition and requirements of the UN Mission it supports and the physical characteristics of the Mission area."
    • Published On: 9/1/2015
  •  Cyber Defense: An International View

    Cyber Defense: An International View

    Cyber Defense: An International View Mr Keir Giles, Ms Kim Hartmann Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Despite the history of offensive cyber activity being much longer than is commonly thought, cyber defense is still considered a new discipline. It is only relatively recently that states have established formal structures to provide for cyber defense, and cyber security more broadly. In this context, each nation has developed its own mix of public, private, and military organizations active in the field."
    • Published On: 9/1/2015
  •  Climate Change: Considerations for Geographic Combatant Commands

    Climate Change: Considerations for Geographic Combatant Commands

    Climate Change: Considerations for Geographic Combatant Commands Colonel Jason A Kirk PKSOI Paper by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, US Army War College Press "Global changes to the environment are having a dire impact on the stability and security of nations and regions within Geographic Combatant Commands. GCCs must focus more attention on emerging threats which impinge on U.S. interests and develop innovative approaches to assist partner nations in planning preventing, and mitigating potential catastrophes."
    • Published On: 9/1/2015
  •  Using Target Audience Analysis to Aid Strategic Level Decisionmaking

    Using Target Audience Analysis to Aid Strategic Level Decisionmaking

    Using Target Audience Analysis to Aid Strategic Level Decisionmaking Dr Steve Tatham Letort Paper by US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Albert Einstein famously stated that: “Any fool can know; the point is to understand.” Over the past 20 years, the United States has known that there exist people with a profound hatred of all that it and the West are, and all that it stands for. During that time the American people and our allies abroad have known war in Iraq, in Afghanistan, and we know that today in Syria, Iraq, in Nigeria and North Africa those enemies plan and plot more violence and more hatred against us. Yet, do we really understand? If there is one observation that has been repeated by military commanders and policymakers alike from almost every nation in our various coalitions, it is the idea that we have not understood our adversary properly."
    • Published On: 8/1/2015
  •  The Army War College Review Vol. 1 No. 3

    The Army War College Review Vol. 1 No. 3

    The Army War College Review Vol. 1 No. 3 Dr Larry D Miller Tim L. Rieger, Edward R. Sullivan, Brandon Newton, Andrew M. Zacherl, Derrick Lee Army War College Review by the US Army War College Press
    • Published On: 8/1/2015
  •  Strategic Insights: Fragile States Cannot Be Fixed With State-Building

    Strategic Insights: Fragile States Cannot Be Fixed With State-Building

    Strategic Insights: Fragile States Cannot Be Fixed With State-Building Robert D. Lamb Article by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "The problem with the way the international community thinks about and responds to fragile states is not that we do not understand “fragility,” its causes, and its cures, but that we think of them as “states,” as coherent units of analysis. As a result of this strategic level mistake, efforts to build state capacity to contain violence and reduce poverty are at least as likely to destabilize the country as they are to help. The U.S. military should consider the destabilizing potential of its efforts to build capacity, train and equip security forces, and provide support to diplomacy and development when its partners and beneficiaries are officials of fragile states."
    • Published On: 7/27/2015
  •  Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 5, Issue 4

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 5, Issue 4

    Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 5, Issue 4 Mister Robert C Browne Peace and Stability Journal by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute During the 2015 PSOTEW, the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) facilitated a discussion aimed at developing a new course on civilian and military relations. The new course will focus on developing the knowledge and skills necessary for mid-level practitioners in the U.S. Government (USG), the Non-Governmental Organization/International Organization (NGO/IO), and multi-national communities to work more effectively with each other and with host country actors."
    • Published On: 7/24/2015
  •  SOLLIMS Sampler – Cross-Cutting Guidelines for Stability Operations (July 2015)

    SOLLIMS Sampler – Cross-Cutting Guidelines for Stability Operations (July 2015)

    SOLLIMS Sampler – Cross-Cutting Guidelines for Stability Operations (July 2015) Mister David A Mosinski PKSOI SOLLIMS Sampler by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute "The seven cross-cutting principles for stability operations are applicable at the individual, organizational, and systemic levels and are pertinent throughout planning, conduct, assessment, and transitions. These principles have proven their worth across the range of peace and stability operations and across diverse operational environments, whether in Afghanistan, Iraq, the Horn of Africa, the Sahel, Southeast Asia, or Central America – as evidenced in countless lessons learned in the SOLLIMS database. What follows is a representative sample of lessons learned – highlighting key elements of each of the seven cross-cutting principles: Host Nation Ownership and Capacity, Political Primacy, Legitimacy, Unity of Effort, Security, Conflict Transformation, and Regional Engagement."
    • Published On: 7/7/2015
  •  United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Police Unit Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Police Unit Manual

    United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Military Police Unit Manual United Nations Peacekeeping Missions Manual by the US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, United Nations "This Manual describes the United Nations (UN) Military Police Unit, focusing on Military Police support to a UN Mission and Force Headquarters. Always scalable in size, modular in function and Mission-tailored, the UN Military Police unit’s size and composition depend on the size, composition and requirements of the UN Mission it supports and the physical characteristics of the Mission area."
    • Published On: 7/1/2015
  •  A Hard Look at Hard Power: Assessing the Defense Capabilities of Key U.S. Allies and Security Partners

    A Hard Look at Hard Power: Assessing the Defense Capabilities of Key U.S. Allies and Security Partners

    A Hard Look at Hard Power: Assessing the Defense Capabilities of Key U.S. Allies and Security Partners Mr Gary J Schmitt Book by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College Press "Since the end of World War II, the United States has made maintaining a favorable balance of power in Eurasia a core element of its national security strategy. It did so in good measure by maintaining a large conventional military force that was based not only at home, but also in bases spread across Europe and Asia. That strategy was buttressed by developing security ties and alliances with key powers and frontline states. The implicit bargain was that the United States would help keep the peace on their door front if they would provide access from which American forces could operate and, in turn, maintain credible forces themselves to reinforce and support U.S. efforts at keeping the great power peace. The question raised by this collection of essays is: Is that bargain unraveling?"
    • Published On: 7/1/2015
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