Central Asia & Caucasus

 
  •  2007 Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL)

    2007 Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL)

    2007 Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) Antulio J. Echevarria II Document by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Today our nation faces several major challenges, ranging in type from the conflict in Iraq to changes in force size and structure. These challenges may be more significant than any the United States has faced in more than a decade. With the publication of the 2007 KSIL, the Strategic Studies Institute and the U.S. Army War College invite all researchers to contribute their efforts to resolving these challenges. Researchers are encouraged to contact any of the SSI points of contact, or those found in the Expanded KSIL, for further information regarding their desired topics. These points of contact are not necessarily subject experts, but can recommend such experts or additional sponsors."
    • Published On: 7/1/2007
  •  U.S. Interests in Central Asia and the Challenges to Them

    U.S. Interests in Central Asia and the Challenges to Them

    U.S. Interests in Central Asia and the Challenges to Them Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "For the United States, Central Asia is a region of both growing importance and of growing challenge. Its proximity to Russia, China, Iran, India, and Pakistan;, location as the center of the Global War on Terrorism; and its large energy holdings make it a strategic region where the United States has important, some might even say vital, interests. Those interests pertain, first of all, to geostrategic realities of security, particularly in the war on terrorism. But they also pertain to energy and to the effort to support liberalizing and democratizing reforms."
    • Published On: 3/1/2007
  •  Georgia After the Rose Revolution: Geopolitical Predicament and Implications for U.S. Policy

    Georgia After the Rose Revolution: Geopolitical Predicament and Implications for U.S. Policy

    Georgia After the Rose Revolution: Geopolitical Predicament and Implications for U.S. Policy Dr Svante E Cornell Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Since its independence, Georgia has been the most vocally independent-minded country in the former Soviet Union. Russia countered Georgia’s independence by strong support for secessionist minorities such as those in Abkhazia and south Ossetia. Since President Vladimir Putin’s coming to power, Russian pressure on Georgia to reverse its pro-Western course has grown measurably. Following the 2003 Rose Revolution in Georgia, relations with Russia turned sour as the new government proved both democratic and single-mindedly focused on rebuilding the Georgian state, resolving the secessionist conflicts, and seeking NATO membership—all anathema to Moscow."
    • Published On: 2/1/2007
  •  Russia, the United States, and the Caucasus

    Russia, the United States, and the Caucasus

    Russia, the United States, and the Caucasus Dr R Craig Nation Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The Caucasus region consists of the new independent states of the Southern Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia) and the Russian federal region of the Northern Caucasus, including war-torn Chechnya. In the post-Soviet period, it has become one of the most volatile and potentially unstable regions in world politics. Fragile state structures, a series of unresolved or “frozen” secessionist conflicts, and widespread poverty generate popular dissatisfaction and political instability. The region covers a major “fault line” between Christian and Islamic civilizations, and confessional rivalry, together with the rise of Islamic radicalism, have become sources of friction. Despite these inherent challenges, the hydrocarbon reserves of the Caspian basin also have attracted significant great power competitive engagement."
    • Published On: 2/1/2007
  •  Is Eurasia's Security Order at Risk?

    Is Eurasia's Security Order at Risk?

    Is Eurasia's Security Order at Risk? Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "The foundation stones of European and Eurasian security are the series of treaties beginning with the Helsinki treaty of 1975 and its extension at Moscow in 1991; the 1987 Washington Treaty on Intermediate Nuclear forces in Europe (INF); the 1990 Paris Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE), extended in 1999; and the Paris and Rome treaties between NATO and Russia in 1997 and 2002. However, some, if not all, of these treaties are apparently at risk. In 2005 Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivano, told U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld that Russia was thinking of withdrawing from the INF Treaty. Although nothing came of this gambit, a lower-ranking Russian general restated this interest in early, 2006, obviously at his superiors’ instigation."
    • Published On: 5/8/2006
  •  Iron Troikas: The New Threat from the East

    Iron Troikas: The New Threat from the East

    Iron Troikas: The New Threat from the East Dr Richard J Krickus Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "There has been widespread discussion of Russia’s efforts to exploit its energy assets to influence developments in Ukraine; specifically, to put pressure on the leaders of the Orange Revolution who have adopted a Western orientation, rather than one toward the East—Russia. Less attention has been devoted to similar efforts undertaken by Russia to advance Moscow’s security objectives in the East Baltic Sea Region (EBSR). Through what the author of this monograph, Dr. Richard Krickus, calls Iron Troikas, he demonstrates how the Russian leadership has exploited its energy assets to advance its security interests in the vital EBSR—with emphasis on Poland and the Baltic countries."
    • Published On: 3/28/2006
  •  Natural Allies? Regional Security in Asia and Prospects for Indo-American Strategic Cooperation

    Natural Allies? Regional Security in Asia and Prospects for Indo-American Strategic Cooperation

    Natural Allies? Regional Security in Asia and Prospects for Indo-American Strategic Cooperation Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "This book-length monograph seeks to illuminate India’s rising power and capabilities with regard to the key regions on its periphery: the Persian Gulf, Central Asia, and South East Asia. The author also considers the major issues pertaining to India’s bilateral defense agenda with the United States. By revealing the dimensions of India’s growing capabilities and interests, he provides a strategic rationale developing the U.S.-India partnership further."
    • Published On: 10/1/2005
  •  After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia

    After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia

    After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia Dr Stephen J Blank Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In the course of its wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. military has deployed forces to hitherto undreamt of destinations in Central Asia and the Caucasus. These deployments reflect more than the exigencies of specific contingencies, but rather are the latest stage in a revolution in strategic affairs that has intersected with the coinciding revolution in military affairs. Thanks to the linked developments in these two processes, the Transcaspian area has now become an area of strategic importance to the United States for many reasons, and not just energy."
    • Published On: 7/1/2005
  •  Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea

    Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea

    Seizing the Day: Resolution in and around the Black Sea Dr Stephen J Blank Op-Ed by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "President Bush’s February 2005 meeting with European and Russian leaders represented an attempt to repair relations with each of these governments, with NATO, and with the European Union (EU). While Iraq, Iran, and Israel probably were the main issues in these meetings, recent events in the Black Sea basin provide an enormous opportunity to advance a common Western agenda and even possibly to associate Russia with an extension of the realm of security in Europe."
    • Published On: 3/1/2005
  •  Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed

    Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed

    Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed Dr Elizabeth Wishnick Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Elizabeth Wishnick builds on the analysis in her important 2002 SSI study, Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia. She contends that by highlighting antiterrorism, the United States addresses a symptom rather than the causes of instability in Central Asia; thus it is contributing to the radicalization of political opposition movements and discrediting both democratization and the U.S. commitment to it. Instead, she argues, the United States should do more to address the underlying human security problems in Central Asia, which increase its vulnerability to terrorist movements."
    • Published On: 5/1/2004
  •  Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries

    Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries

    Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries Mr Roger N McDermott Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "In this monograph, Roger N. McDermott offers a framework for improving the antiterrorist capabilities of the Central Asian militaries. This includes increased and focused military training with a special emphasis on Special Forces units. The training should take place within a regional train and equip program to increase effectiveness and efficiency. But, McDermott argues, all assistance to the Central Asian states must complement broader diplomatic efforts to promote social, economic, and political reform."
    • Published On: 2/1/2004
  •  Strengthening Regional Cooperation in Central Asia / Central Asian States Disaster Response Conference 2003

    Strengthening Regional Cooperation in Central Asia / Central Asian States Disaster Response Conference 2003

    Strengthening Regional Cooperation in Central Asia / Central Asian States Disaster Response Conference 2003 Prof Bernard F Griffard, LTC Curtis W Turner, Prof Bert B Tussing Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The world continues to get smaller, and the neighborhoods that it is composed of are becoming more dependent upon one another. Today’s threats to stability are trans-national in nature and rarely contained within the borders of one country. In most cases the consequences of a major terrorist action or environmental disaster will quickly overwhelm the management capability and response assets of the affected nation. When that occurs the maintenance of stability relies on effective regional, and if required, international assistance. A government that attempts to “go it alone” in today’s environment runs the risk of losing the confidence of its citizens and, as a result, its viability. As part of the United States’ active efforts to forge new, productive international relationships to meet the challenges of the 21st century, encouraging stronger regional ties where few currently exist is a key policy initiative."
    • Published On: 11/15/2003
  •  Partnering for Environmental Security in Central Asia and the Caspian Region

    Partnering for Environmental Security in Central Asia and the Caspian Region

    Partnering for Environmental Security in Central Asia and the Caspian Region Arthur L Bradshaw, Dr Kent H Butts, Prof Bernard F Griffard, COL Jeffrey C Reynolds Study by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Central Command the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Environmental Security " 'Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin' was a U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) conference cosponsored by the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Environmental Security (DUSD-ES), the Center for Strategic Leadership (CSL) of the U.S. Army War College, and the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, and hosted by the Marshall Center at the Armed Forces Recreation Center, Chiemsee, Germany. "
    • Published On: 5/1/2003
  •  Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia

    Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia

    Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Dr Elizabeth Wishnick Monograph by the US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute "Among the many changes brought to American security policy by the attacks of September 11, 2001, is a shift in the strategic geography. Regions and nations that had been at the periphery of concern have taken on new importance because of their relationship to terrorists and the states that sponsor them. Nowhere is this more true than in Central Asia. Until recently, the United States paid very little attention to Central Asia. Now the combination of energy reserves and the region’s location has increased its strategic significance a great deal."
    • Published On: 10/1/2002
  •  Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin

    Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin

    Partnering for Environmental Security Cooperation in Central Asia and the Caspian Basin Dr Kent H Butts, COL Jeffrey C Reynolds Issue Paper by the US Army War College, Center for Strategic Leadership "The Central Asian region encompasses Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. These newly independent republics, as well as the Transcaucasus states of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, have become increasingly important to the United States’ national security interests. Decades of mineral exploitation, inefficient water use, and environmental neglect have left the region scarred—this environmental damage continues to threaten the stability of these new nations. Environmental Security has the potential to become a catalyst for multilateral cooperation and a powerful enabler for U.S. regional policy and security interests."
    • Published On: 5/15/2002
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