How Nation-States Craft National Security Strategy Documents Authored by: Dr Alan G Stolberg. October 01, 2012

The need for security and the institutionalization of that security in national strategy and its associated documents is becoming a significant concern for nations in the 21st century international system. This need requires the development of national-level strategies that are designed with objectives; the attainment of which can ensure that the conditions necessary for security for a given actor in the international system can be met. The intent of this monograph is to explore the actual processes that nation-states employ to craft their national security strategy-related documents. The study aligned individual case studies of nation-states conducting their national strategy document formulation processes. These case studies were selected based upon a determination of two primary factors: 1) The nation-states in question had developed national security strategy documents that involved participation in the drafting process from more than one department or agency from the executive branch of government; and, 2) Individual participants that were involved in the actual drafting process would be willing to respond to the questions delineated above, either in person or by written response. In addition, subject to travel resource availability, an effort was made to have as many different regions of the world as possible represented in the review. Ultimately, five countries and their national strategy documents were selected for assessment: Australia, Brazil, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Once the data was gathered, the monograph written so as to compare and contrast the various processes employed by each nation in their strategy document development. The last portion of the analysis evaluates the lessons learned from all five cases and identifies specific lessons that could be applicable to strategy document formulation for any future actor engaged in the process.

2016-17 Key Strategic Issues List Edited by: Prof John F Troxell. July 01, 2016

The United States faces security challenges within a global context of rapid technological change, significant demographic shifts, an uncertain economy, and geostrategic power dynamics of historic proportions. These conditions intensify the level of uncertainty and the pace of change, and raise the potential for significant interstate conflict to levels higher than at any time since the end of the Cold War. We must continue to focus the efforts of the Army's educational institutions on addressing these seemingly insurmountable challenges. The Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL), developed by the U.S. Army War College, in coordination with Headquarters, Department of the Army and major commands throughout the Army, includes issues we must address to ensure the Army of 2025 and beyond will continue to meet the needs of the Nation. As we build a new future to deal with this growing complexity, the Army will require evolutionary change, and this change begins by changing mindsets. This necessary change must be based on rigorous research and the development of ideas that are invaluable to the Army and to the Nation. With your work and research, our Army will be better prepared for the future and the threats posed against our Nation's interests.

How the Army Runs Authored by: Prof Charles D Allen, Mr Armor Brown II, COL (Ret) Jerry Chastain, Mr Craig Dyer, Prof Edward J Filiberti, Mr Steven Grimes, Dr Jeffrey L Groh, LTC (Ret) Colin Halvorson, MAJ (Ret), Dr Greg Hamlett, Prof Robert S Hume, LTC (Ret) Jerry Kelly, Mr Jim Kennedy, MAJ Jon Lacy, Ms Julie T Manta, Ms Doriot Mascarich, Dr Richard M Meinhart, COL (Ret) Terry Melton, COL Benjamin M Nutt, COL (Ret) Ben Rivera, Mr Charles Scott, LTC Jerome T Sibayan, LTC Cheryl L Smart, Mr Kurt Speed, LTC (Ret) Martha Stewart, Mr Brian Sullivan, MSG Joey Thompson, Prof Douglas E Waters, Prof Louis G Yuengert. August 28, 2015

Since the events of 9/11, the Army has transformed to a modular force, transitioned to regional engagement augmented with a stand-by global response force, and continued as a force trusted to defend America’s citizens and interests at home and abroad. The Army, as the backbone of the Joint Force, requires dynamic change, adaptation to the variables of the Operating Environment, agility to overmatch adversaries, and the staying power to withstand the blows of a convulsive strategic environment. Army Force Management, as a continuum across Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership and Education, Personnel, Facilities, and Policy, is the capstone process that enables the Army to manage change, build opportunities, and reduce risk to the Nation, all while meeting statutory requirements. How The Army Runs (HTAR) is the United States Army War College’s Reference Book which serves as a primer and ready reference to officers preparing to assume command, leadership and management positions at the strategic level.

Campaign Planning Handbook Authored by: COL Douglas W Bennett, COL Tarn D Warren. November 21, 2016

The purpose of this document is to assist United States Army War College students during the Theater Strategy and Campaigning (TSC) course. It also serves to assist commanders, planners, and other staff officers in combatant commands (CCMD), joint task forces (JTF), and service component commands. It supplements joint doctrine and contains elements of emerging doctrine as practiced globally by joint force commanders (JFCs). It portrays a way to apply doctrine and emerging doctrine at the higher levels of joint command, with a primary emphasis at the combatant command level.

U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues, Vol. 1: Theory of War and Strategy, 5th Ed. Authored by: Dr J Boone Bartholomees Jr. Edited by: Dr J Boone Bartholomees Jr. June 01, 2012

This edition of the U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues continues to reflect the structure and approach of the core national security strategy and policy curriculum at the U.S. Army War College. The 5th Edition is published in two volumes that correspond roughly to the Department of National Security and Strategy’s core courses: “Theory of War and Strategy” and “National Security Policy and Strategy.” Like previous editions, this one is based on its predecessor, but contains both updates and new scholarship. Over a third of the chapters are new or have undergone significant rewrites. Many chapters, some of which appeared for years in this work, have been removed. Nevertheless, the book remains unchanged in intent and purpose. Although this is not primarily a textbook, it does reflect both the method and manner that the U.S. Army War College uses to teach strategy formulation to America’s future senior leaders. The book is not a comprehensive or exhaustive treatment of either strategic theory or the policymaking process. Both volumes are organized to proceed from the general to the specific. Thus, the first volume opens with general thoughts on the nature and theory of war and strategy, proceeds to look at the complex aspect of power, and concludes with specific theoretical issues. Similarly, the second volume begins by examining the policy/strategy process, moves to a look at the strategic environment, and concludes with some specific issues. This edition continues the effort begun in the 4th Edition to include several short case studies to illustrate the primary material in the volume.

U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues, Vol 2: National Security Policy and Strategy, 5th Ed. Authored by: Dr J Boone Bartholomees Jr. Edited by: Dr J Boone Bartholomees Jr. July 01, 2012

This edition of the U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues continues to reflect the structure and approach of the core national security strategy and policy curriculum at the U.S. Army War College. The 5th Edition is published in two volumes that correspond roughly to the Department of National Security and Strategy’s core courses: “Theory of War and Strategy” and “National Security Policy and Strategy.” Like previous editions, this one is based on its predecessor, but contains both updates and new scholarship. Over a third of the chapters are new or have undergone significant rewrites. Many chapters, some of which appeared for years in this work, have been removed. Nevertheless, the book remains unchanged in intent and purpose. Although this is not primarily a textbook, it does reflect both the method and manner that the U.S. Army War College uses to teach strategy formulation to America’s future senior leaders. The book is not a comprehensive or exhaustive treatment of either strategic theory or the policymaking process. Both volumes are organized to proceed from the general to the specific. Thus, the first volume opens with general thoughts on the nature and theory of war and strategy, proceeds to look at the complex aspect of power, and concludes with specific theoretical issues. Similarly, the second volume begins by examining the policy/strategy process, moves to a look at the strategic environment, and concludes with some specific issues. This edition continues the effort begun in the 4th Edition to include several short case studies to illustrate the primary material in the volume.