Parameters Autumn 2017, Vol. 47 No. 3 Edited by: Dr Antulio J Echevarria II. November 30, 2017

FEATURES: Special Commentary. Limits of Negative Peace, Faces of Positive Peace — Patricia M. Shields. A Wake for Counterinsurgency? Abandoning Counterinsurgency: Reviving Antiterrorism Strategy—Steven Metz. Insurgent Defectors in Counterinsurgencies—Jacqueline L. Hazelton. War among (& for) the People. Rethinking NATO Policy on the Protection of Civilians—Sten Rynning. Military Force and Mass Migration in Europe—Matthew N. Metzel and John M. Lorenzen. War and Social Perception. Casualties of Their Own Success: The 2011 Urination Incident in Afghanistan—Paolo G. Tripodi and David M. Todd. Third-Force Influences: Hollywood’s War Films—John Chapin, Marissa Mendoza- Burcham, and Mari Pierce. Army Expansibility. Expanding Brigade Combat Teams: Is the Training Base Adequate?—Esli T. Pitts. Rapid Expansion and the Army’s Matériel: Is There Enough?—Robb C. Mitchell.

India's Strategic Defense Transformation: Expanding Global Relationships Authored by: LTC Brian K Hedrick. November 01, 2009

India’s transformation to modernize its military, obtain “strategic partnerships” with the United States and other nations, and expand its influence in the Indian Ocean and beyond includes a shift from an emphasis on the former Soviet Union as the primary supplier of defense articles to a western base of supply and an increasing emphasis on bilateral exercises and training with many of the global powers. The author explores the nature of this transformation, offers insights into the history of Indian defense relations, and suggests implications to U.S. foreign and defense policy. Much has been written regarding India’s relations with its neighbors, especially Pakistan and China. The author adds a new perspective by taking a global view of India’s rise as a regional and future global military power through its bilateral defense relations and the potential conflict this creates with India’s legacy as a leader of the Non-Aligned Movement.

Strategic Leadership Primer: 3rd Edition Edited by: Dr Stephen J Gerras. June 25, 2010

The original edition of the Strategic Leadership Primer, published in 1998, served the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) well as a basic overview of Strategic Leadership. Written by Dr. Rod Magee with the assistance of several other faculty members, it was intended as an orientation reading for students arriving at the USAWC whose backgrounds were primarily in the tactical and operational field environment. The Primer was useful because there was no other adequate work that described and defined strategic leadership in terms that could be understood and applied by USAWC students.

A 2nd edition was published in 2004 and edited by Colonel (Ret) Steve Shambach. This 3rd edition updates significant portions of the Primer, especially Chapters 1, 2, and 3 and also adds a chapter on decision making (Chapter 5). It is not that the nature of strategic leadership has changed drastically, rather this edition preserves the salient features of the original editions. It is updated with contemporary literature and examples to sustain the Primer’s relevance.

The editor acknowledges the tremendous contributions of Colonel Murf Clark and Professor Charles Allen, along with editing assistance from Commander Traci Keegan and Dr. Richard Meinhart, while also acknowledging previous edition contributions from Dr. Lenny Wong, Dr. Craig Bullis, and Colonel (Ret) George Reed.

Still Soldiers and Scholars? An Analysis of Army Officer Testing Authored by: Dr Steven J. Condly, Dr Arthur T Coumbe, LTC William L Skimmyhorn. December 15, 2017

Still Soldiers and Scholars? sheds light on a neglected aspect of talent management, namely, officer accessions testing and evaluation. It does so by tracing the history of officer testing since 1900, identifying and analyzing key developments in the assessment process, and then offering recommendations about how the Army should revise its approach to officer testing. This book supplements a series of monographs written by the Army’s Office of Economic and Manpower Analysis (OEMA) and published by the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) in 2009 and 2010. In those monographs, the authors proposed an officer corps strategy based on the theory of talent management. This book is a necessary first step in reforming the Army’s officer accessions effort in order to better align it with the Army’s talent-based approach to officer management.

2017-18 Key Strategic Issues List Edited by: COL Todd E. Key. November 15, 2017

For over a decade, the USAWC has published the annual Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) to inform students, faculty, and external research associates of strategic topics requiring research and analysis. Part I of the Academic Year (AY) 2018 KSIL, referred to as the Chief of Staff of the Army Special Interest Topics, consists of critical topics demanding special attention. A subset of these topics will be addressed by the USAWC as Integrated Research Projects. Part II: Army Priorities for Strategic Analysis, has been developed by the U.S. Army War College in coordination with Headquarters Department of the Army (HQDA) and Major Commands throughout the Army. The KSIL will help prioritize strategic research and analysis conducted by USAWC students and faculty, USAWC Fellows, and external researchers, to link their research efforts and results more effectively to the Army’s highest priority topics.

Armed Robotic Systems Emergence: Weapons Systems Life Cycles Analysis and New Strategic Realities Authored by: Dr Robert J Bunker. November 14, 2017

Armed robotic systems—drones and droids—now emerging on the battlefield portend new strategic realities not only for U.S. forces but also for our allies and future potential belligerents. Numerous questions of immediate warfighting importance come to mind with the fielding of these drones and droids that are viewed as still being in their experimental and entrepreneurial stage of development. By drawing upon historical weapons systems life cycles case studies, focusing on the early 9th through the mid-16th-century knight, the mid-19th through the later 20th-century battleship, and the early 20th through the early 21st-century tank, the monograph provides military historical context related to their emergence, and better allows both for questions related to warfighting to be addressed, and policy recommendations related to them to be initially provided.

Evaluation of the 2015 DoD Cyber Strategy: Mild Progress in a Complex and Dynamic Military Domain Authored by: Mr Jeffrey L Caton. November 02, 2017

In 2011, the Department of Defense (DoD) released its Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace, which officially recognized cyberspace as an operational domain akin to the traditional military domains of land, sea, air, and space. This monograph examines the 2015 DoD Cyber Strategy to evaluate how well its five strategic goals and associated implementation objectives define an actionable strategy to achieve three primary missions in cyberspace: defend the DoD network, defend the United States and its interests, and develop cyber capabilities to support military operations. This monograph focuses on events and documents from the period of about 1 year before and 1 year after the 2015 strategy was released. This allows sufficient time to examine the key policies and guidance that influenced the development of the strategy as well as follow-on activities for the impacts from the strategy. This inquiry has five major sections that utilize different frameworks of analysis to assess the strategy:
1. Prima Facie Analysis: What is its stated purpose and key messages?
2.  Historical Context Analysis: What unique contributions does it introduce into the evolution of national security cyberspace activities?
3.  Traditional Strategy Analysis: Does it properly address specific DoD needs as well as broader U.S. ends in a way that is appropriate and actionable?
4.  Analysis of Subsequent DoD Action: How are major military cyberspace components—joint and Service—planning to implement these goals and objectives?
5.  Whole of U.S. Government Analysis: Does it integrate with the cyberspace-related activities of other U.S. Government departments and agencies?
The monograph concludes with a section that integrates the individual section findings and offers recommendations to improve future cyberspace strategic planning documents.

Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 7, Issue 2 Edited by: Mister Robert C Browne. October 12, 2017

Welcome to the most recent issue of the PKSOI Peace & Stability Journal. In this edition the PKSOI Director Colonel Gregory Dewitt will introduce the articles of the Journal, go over the past three months of PKSOI's activities and also brief you on the upcoming major activities and events. This journal features articles from PKSOI Subject Matter Experts in their respective fields and also include articles from PKSOI interns. The feature is from PSKOI intern Abdullah Rumman.

A Typology of Arguments about Drone Ethics Authored by: Dr Mary Manjikian. October 10, 2017

Many different actors oppose the use of unmanned autonomous weapons (UAV’s) from adversary states, to international governmental organizations to policymakers and academics. However, the basis for their opposition varies, as do the assumptions behind their arguments. This Letort Paper lays out distinctions between arguments about technology, arguments about policy, and arguments about strategy.

Toward a NATO of the Gulf? The Challenges of Collective Defense Within the GCC Authored by: Dr Jean-Loup Samaan. September 28, 2017

Although collective security in the Gulf is the topic of numerous policy publications, most of the available literature focuses on the political environment without considering the operational requirements of this scenario. This monograph offers an evaluation of Gulf defense cooperation programs in order to stir the discussion on the future of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) as the “NATO of the Gulf.”